Adams County residents attend Trump Inauguration

Adams County Commissioner Ty Pell and his wife Jene are shown in front of the US Capitol, part of the crowd at the inauguration of President Donald Trump.

Enthusiastic crowds cheer Trump, boo Democrats –

By Patricia Beech –

Nearly 40 people from Adams, Brown and Pike Counties journeyed by bus to Washington, DC to witness Donald John Trump being sworn in as the 45th President of the United States.
Joining the exuberant crowds gathered along the National Mall, they listened as the new president promised, “I will fight for you with every breath in my body, and I will never, ever let you down. From this day forward, it’s going to be only America first, America first.”
Adams County Commissioner Ty Pell, who traveled with the group to the nation’s capitol, said he thought the new president’s speech was “right on topic for how he campaigned”. “I’d never been to an inauguration before,” Pell said. “It was very exciting, the crowd was energized and cheering, except when Democrats came on stage, you could hear the crowd booing them.”
“It was like being a part of history,” Pell’s wife Jene said.  “The energy of the crowd was great, and it was a very positive experience except for the protestors, but of course they have the right to do that.
Freedom of speech and freedom to assemble are their rights. That’s what makes America great.”
Retired Adams County teachers Mary Fulton and Linda McFarland were also among the hundreds of thousands gathered on the National Mall. It was the second inauguration the life-long friends had attended together. Fulton, who is Republican, said, “We went to Bill Clinton’s second inauguration, and Linda told me if I ever wanted her to go again with me she’d do it.” McFarland, the only Democrat in the group said, “I wanted to go, not because it was a Democratic or Republican event, I believe any time a president is inaugurated it is an important historical event, and this one, with all the controversy was even more historic and interesting than most.”
Fulton said she thought most of the people in the crowd were Trump supporters. “He got a lot of applause, and people kept calling out ‘We love Trump, We love Trump’.”
McFarland, who says she doesn’t allow politics to interfere with her personal relationships (her husband is a Republican) agreed that the crowd was primarily Republican. “But I enjoyed it just as I would any other inauguration. The only thing that bothered me about that day was how disrespectful the crowds were whenever any Democrat was introduced,” she said. “When Michelle Obama entered they booed her, when President Obama entered they booed him and started chanting “you’re fired”, they booed through Chuck Schumer’s whole speech and called ‘get off the stage, get off the stage’, then they started chanting ‘We want Trump”, “We want Trump’. I just found that atmosphere disrespectful. It’s not a political party thing with me – I was just brought up to respect people.”
Peebles First State Bank branch manager Brenda Brown, who attended with her sisters, Beverly Beasley and Emma Phillips, called the event an awesome experience. “I’ve always wanted to go to an inauguration, and I really enjoyed being a part of it. There were people of different backgrounds from all over the country and the energy in the crowd was just fantastic,” she said. “I didn’t hear any boos when Trump came out, but we did hear people booing the Democrats, which I didn’t think was necessary, people didn’t need to do that.”
Following the inauguration ceremony Commissioner Pell and several other members of the group traveled to the offices of Congressman Brad Wenstrup. “We spent about 20 minutes discussing issues that matter to the people of Adams County,” said Pell. “And I briefed the Congressman on the current DP&L situation at the power plants.”