Drug bust in West Union

Local authorities arrested two people with a mobile meth lab in their vehicle at the UDF in West Union last week.
Local authorities arrested two people with a mobile meth lab in their vehicle at the UDF in West Union last week.

Mobile meth lab discovered in vehicle –

Story by Patricia Beech –
Photo by Mark Carpenter –

Two individuals arrested Thursday, Dec. 1 in the parking lot of the United Dairy Farmers were charged with cooking mobile meth in their red Ford Explorer. William Eugene Rein II, 38, of West Union and Gina Niccole Chamblin, 34, of Toledo were taken into custody by Officer Ryan Myers of the West Union Police Department.
“I stopped them because they had a cracked windshield, but as I approached their car I could smell a chemical odor that is common with the manufacture of methamphetamine,” said Myers.
After discovering the methamphetamine under the vehicle’s passenger seat, Myers cleared the area and called a unit specializing in the breakdown of meth labs to the scene, along with the West Union Fire Department and Life Squad.
In a statement to authorities, Chamblin claimed she “didn’t know there was meth in the vehicle until Reins threw it at her and asked her to hide it in her pants, advising her to run when the car stopped or he’d face 10 years in prison for possession”. She admitted providing Reins the lithium batteries he needed to produce the meth in exchange for some of the finished product.
Both Reins and Chamblin were suspected of being under the influence of drugs at the time of their arrest. The couple was charged with the Illegal Assembly or Possession of Chemicals for the Manufacture of Drugs.
ccording to Adams County Sheriff Kimmy Rogers, authorities are beginning to see a rise in the use of methamphetamine.
“We’ve got people switching from heroin to meth because it’s so much cheaper, and that’s a double edged sword,” said Rogers. “The number of deaths caused by heroin drops, but with meth there is a greater chance for violent crimes being committed.”
Rogers said the drug which is called “Ice” on the street, is coming into America through our southern border with Mexico. “There are large quantities of this drug entering the country across that border and it’s costing the people of Adams County hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, not to mention the billions it’s costing our country.”
Like most law enforcement officers Rogers would like to see steps taken to end the flow of drugs into the U.S. “What the government is doing isn’t working,” he says. “If you compare the number of people killed in terrorist attacks to the number of people who’ve died from drug overdoses, it isn’t even close.”