CTC Automotive Program receives national accreditation

Students in the Automotive Training Program at the OVCTC are changing a tire as instructor Joe Palmer supervises.  Photo by Patricia Beech.
Students in the Automotive Training Program at the OVCTC are changing a tire as instructor Joe Palmer supervises. Photo by Patricia Beech.

Students will enter workforce as certified auto technicians

By Patricia Beech

These days consumers are hanging onto their vehicles longer than usual, and that means keeping up with maintenance and repairs to make them last. How can drivers be sure that they’re getting quality work done on their vehicles? Finding an auto mechanic you trust need not be a matter of chance. Much of the guesswork can be eliminated by looking for an Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) sign in your chosen repair shop. The sign indicates that the shop’s auto technicians have met national testing standards and qualifications.

Now, students in the Automotive Training program at the Ohio Valley Career and Technical Center in West Union will have the opportunity to join the ranks of more than 300,000 certified ASE technicians.

The program recently received accreditation from the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) for G1 Maintenance and Light Repair.

“During the past few months, we have worked closely with NATEF to make certain that our program would meet strict industry standards, and now we are delighted to join the ranks of the NATEF accredited training programs,” said automotive instructor, Joe Palmer. “Students will be assured of a quality education, and shop owners will be assured of getting quality job applicants.”

The National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence works to improve the quality of vehicle repair and service by training automotive professionals.

To achieve accredidation, the school’s automotive program underwent rigorous evaluation by the NATEF, and met the nationally accepted standards of excellence in areas such as instruction, facilities, and equipment.

Ohio Valley School District board member, Charlie Bess said, “This is great thing for our students, it took hard work and dedication to the students and the program.”

“This is great news for automotive-minded young people and their parents,” said Donald Seyfer, former NATEF Chair. “Because this program increases cooperation between local education and industry leaders, it gives added assurance that OVCTC’s graduates will be employable entry-level technicians. As a result of the quality education provided by OVCTC the motoring public will benefit since better repair technicians will join the work force.”

The NATEF is a non-profit, independent organization that evaluates and accredits entry-level technician training programs against standards developed by the automotive industry.

NATEF automotive professionals are tested and certified “so that shop owners and service customers can better gauge a technicians level of expertise before contracting the technician’s services. The certifications allow automotive technicians to offer tangible proof of their skills, which means peace of mind for their auto service customers’.

According to NATEF the certification measures a technician’s skills over a wide range of automotive systems maintenance and light repair. To earn certification in this new specialty, candidates must achieve a passing score on the exam and have at least one year of full-time work experience.

ASE Certification tests are written by seasoned automotive industry professionals and executives, including working technicians, automobile manufacturers, and educators.