WINCHESTER HAPPENINGS

The Winchester Bicentennial (200 years) will be Aug. 28, 29 and 30. There have been remarkable changes during this time which will be documented and reflected in the Bicentennial Book. We want to invite local businesses, churches and homeowners to participate in our celebration by decorating your facility or home as well as consider being part of the Sunday afternoon parade.

We have a Bicentennial Committee meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, June 18, in the Town Hall.

Our local police department will again be participating in the National Night Out this year and we will be providing more information. (I saw the backpacks and they are really cute). David and Rich will be posting information on their Facebook Page (Winchester Police Department).

The United Methodist Women held their June meeting on Monday June 8 in the church annex. Twenty-two members and one guest enjoyed the meal and the program presented by the committee of Carol Foster, Linda Downs, Liz Doss and Lynda Williams. The business meeting was conducted by the President Kathy Willman. Reports were given and pens and pencils were collected to give to the North Adams Library. Two proposals were made to help an organization in Africa and to help any of the youth who wish to go to camp this summer. It was approved to do this. Next month members are to prepare shoe boxes filled with items for the Homeless Shelter.

The excitement this weekend was the opening of the Family Dollar Store. We hope you are able to show your appreciation by supporting local business.

We need healing prayers this week for Rita Harper who is a patient in Mercy Clermont. Also keep Linda Barnes and Billie Burton in your prayers.

We now have more Bicentennial T-shirts and if you would like to purchase one let us know. They are $15 each.

Winchester’s Past (Florence): One of the most highly respected and prominent people who lived in Winchester in the 1850s was Hyman Israel DeBruin. He was born in Holland of Jewish parents in 1796. In 1820 he set sail for America after borrowing money for his fare. He and a friend walked and took an emigrant wagon to Pittsburgh where they got a flat boat to Maysville. He got a job as a bookkeeper and in 1822 he married Rebecca Easton. A terrible epidemic of cholera hit Maysville in 1833 and Hyman moved the family to Winchester and opened a mercantile business. He and Rebecca had 12 children, four of whom died as infants. The oldest son, Israel Hyman worked for his father and when his father retired in 1854 he took over the store. Hyman Israel had gathered quite a sum of money, $60,000 or $70,000 from his years in the store. He became a Christian and joined the Methodist Church in 1844. On his tombstone in the Winchester cemetery it says, “Born a Jew, lived a life of faith, died a Christian.”