Junior Fair BBQ again a big success Beulah B James Senior Profile: Josie Myers Lady Indians place second at Ohio Classic in Hillsboro MVCA dominates Greyhounds in 45-0 triumph For Lady Devils, SHAC streak goes to 55 matches 9/11: Sixteen years later Gertrude Gibson Defender Bowl coming Sept. 16 Joyce A Walker Virginia R Young Senior Profile: Abby Campton West Union hosts 2017 Dragon Run New gridiron history begins for Peebles Trout, fire, and blueberry fields forever Senior Profile: Baylee Justice Lady Devils win SHAC thriller at Eastern Brown From Blue Creek to the Beaneaters Tough loss for Greyhounds in season opener Turning tragedy into hope What we learn from failure Absolutely had to get the wrinkles out Frances S Kidder Leo Trotter 41st Bentonville Festival set to begin Sept. 8 Winchester celebrates its history during three-day street fair Cruisefest returning to streets of Peebles Blue Creek- a community in transition honors its history and heritage Cuteness Galore – Winchester Homecoming Festival Baby Show Ronnie L Day Cast your vote for the Adams County Fairgrounds Nelson E Atkinson Ryan L Colvin Richard Tackett William L Tadlock Penny Pollard Wendell Beasley West Union soccer drops pair at Mason County Lady Indians go down in straight sets Senior Profile: Michael Gill Senior Profile: Katie Sandlin Royals dominate in big win over North Adams Dragons continue County Cup domination Archaeology Day returns to Serpent Mound Hourglass Quilt Square is back up again Manchester family hosts International Guests History, farming, and family- the bedrock of Cherry Fork’s community Bus drivers, emergency responders prepare for coming school year Working up a real good sweat What’s behind the motive? Rondal R Bailey Jr Thelma J Yates She’s all grown up now Scott A Yeager Soccer talent on display at 2017 SHAC preview Baseball community mourns the loss of Gene Bennett Winchester Homecoming Festival is Aug 25-27 Eleanor P Tumbleson Felicity man killed in Ohio River boating accident WUHS golfers take Portsmouth Invitational It was pretty cold that day Volleyball kicks off with SHAC Preview Night Young awarded Women’s Western Golf Foundation Scholarship One Mistake Senator Portman visits GE Test Facility in Peebles Adams County school districts facing some major challenges for the coming year Family, friends, and roots: the ties that bind residents of one Adams County village What is your strength? Just the chance to take a look back Ronnie L Wolford Dale J Marshall Herbert Purvis Great American Solar Eclipse coming Aug. 21 BREAKING NEWS: West Union wins fifth consecutive County Cup Wallace B Boden John L Fletcher Lady Indians golfers learning the links North Adams, West Union golfers open 2017 seasons This Labor Day, ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Blanton announces candicacy for Court of Appeals Local student attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders MHS welcomes new principal Made in America When it feels like you’re spinning plates Bonfires and “building” a farm Lady Devils looking to take that next step 50 years of Bengal memories Ag Society delivers donation to Dragonfly Foundation Young Memorial Scholarship awarded to a pair of local seniors ‘Musical passion is in his blood’ Naylor named NAHS Principal Boldman retiring after 17 years as Homeless Shelter director Manchester concludes another River Days celebration Drug Treatment vs. Prison James R Brown Bobby Lawler Jr Adams County man charged with killing estranged girlfriend Lexie N Hopkins Volleyball, soccer previews coming this weekend Michael A Cheek

As Mr. Seas It, for ACOVSD High School graduates

By Richard Seas, ACOVSD Superintendent – 

On May 19, 20, and 21, West Union High School, North Adams High School, and Peebles High School, respectively, will participate in commencement exercises. Congratulations to our graduates, their parents, family members, and the Adams County Ohio Valley School District for demonstrating and providing the care, compassion, and the support necessary to graduate from high school. Our students as the Class of 2017 have represented themselves and our school/community admirably.
As Superintendent for the ACOVSD, I’m grateful for the milestone that our students have met. However, I can’t help but wonder, perhaps worry a bit, about whether or not we as a school/community have prepared our graduates for life outside the walls of our schools. Do our graduates have the academic preparation to attend a post-secondary institution and continue their education? Do our graduates have the skill necessary to enter into the workforce, maintain a job, and support themselves? Just exactly where will our graduates find meaningful employment?
In order for me to make better sense out of my surroundings, the culture of Adams County, and answer some of the questions that I just asked, I have deliberately taken the time to speak with many people throughout Adams County, attend workshops, and read several articles and books to better understand the beauty as well as the challenges of the Appalachian culture.
Recently, I just completed a book called “Hillbilly Elegy” written by J.D. Vance. J.D. Vance authors his memoir of a family and culture in crisis. J.D. writes that “Hillbilly Elegy” is a passionate and personal crisis—that of poor, white Americans. The Vance family story began with hope in post-war America. J.D.’s grandparents were dirt poor and in love and moved from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually one of their grandchildren would serve in the Marine Corps, graduate from Ohio State, and graduate from Yale Law School. As J.D. discusses his trial and tribulations living in Appalachia and eventually graduating from Yale Law School, so will be the case for some, but not enough of our Adams County students who will successfully enter the workforce or attend and graduate from college.
As a school superintendent and member of the Adams County School/Community, my hope is that while we embrace the rich tradition and history of our Appalachian culture, we recognize the need to increase the importance of education and provide our students with unlimited opportunities for success. Congratulations to the Class of 2017!

One comment:

  1. I think what needs to be understood is that education and success are relative terms and have very different meanings to different people. And levels of education many times increase through generations of a family. My father was first generation HS Grad and through his encouragement I became a first generation college grad. Although J.D. Vance relates a compelling saga of Appalachian life I don’t beleve success should only be measured by ones level of education or thr college they attended. Over and above that it needs to be understood that not all Appalachian people fit the sensationalized mold that Mr. Vance portrays in his book. I was raised on a small farm in Appalachia. We had an outdoor toilet, heated with wood, amd for a time carried in water in a bucket. My parents rarely argued, niether was an addict of alcohol or drugs, and they were both adults when they married. Much like about all of my friends whom lived alot the same way we did. I never saw my father display helplesness or chaos, even in the modst of hard times. My grandfather had an 8th grade education. He built a successful construction company from the ground up through hard work and dedication. He built many fine homes and commercial buildings, employed many people and had his work featured on television and other media. He was very financially successful and owned vacation homes and took vacations just like many highly educated professionals did. I believe the greatest preparation we can give to our children is to teach them master basic skills, instill in them a strong work ethic, and to educate themselves on what path they want to follow I life. And hopefully make them unferstand that success is not measured soley by the level of ones education or where they attained it. Buy by setting goals working and preparing themselves to achive them. Although literature is a valuable learning tool, we have to understand that a book is basically the authors opinion, or viewpoint through his a or her experiences. And they do not always give a totally accurate picture of how things are everywhere, especially outside the spectrum of the authors experience.

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