Richard Francis Frank B Young William Scaff Gregory A Silvia Jr Davis now the winningest coach in Lady Devils basketball history Clutch plays give Green Devils OT win Eighth grade Greyhounds go on the road, grab 55-41 conference win at Whiteoak Lady Indians can’t hang on, fall to Eastern Brown Indians open up with big Homecoming win Greyhounds drilled by Fairfield in season opener How to sell 94 losses NAES leads local schools represented at PBIS Showcase PHS Beta Club recognized as National School of Distinction MES wins Momentum Award for second year running Fire destroys Winchester business Martha Becraft Cynthia A Sopher Clarys Holliday Basketball Special: 2017-18 Justice girls lead Peebles to win over Felicity Senior Profile: Adison Wright Lady Dragons slain by buzzer-beater Freshmen double-doubles lead Lady Hounds to win in opener County mourns passing of OVSD Board member Tom Reed Peebles man arrested in connection with woman’s disappearance Leaving a written legacy Not really ready to go back to pioneer days Peebles Jr./Sr. High School awarded PBIS Bronze Award North Adams High School named National Beta School of Distinction Operation Christmas Child collects 1,867 boxes Samantha Jameson honored as Young Professional of the Year Youth Deer Season again plagued by bad weather Humane Society hosting Ugly Christmas Sweater contest Dec. 9 Local centenarian celebrates birthday number 100 with family and friends Jerry R Pratt Edward Lykins Jr NAES students focus on spreading kindness Leland P Sautter Kelly B Anderson Dorothy Grooms Sharon D Brumley Anna J Grooms Local student/athletes awarded Wendy’s Heisman Awards Lady Devils JV triumph in opener Senior Profile: Colten Ball Peebles hosts SHAC Boys Preview Lady Devils fall in tough opener Janet A Pedicord Nettie R Fleshman Senior Profile: Sianna Mills North Adams boys ride the ‘3’ train to victory Lady Devils trounce Georgetown Senior Profile: Austin Stamper North Adams’ Williams named OIAAA Administrator of the Year County hoops squads on display in SHAC Girls Preview Going off the grid Michael L Chamblin A newer, kinder county pound takes a more humane approach TAG students are winners at Invention Convention Adams County Florist decks the halls Thomas J Reed Shirley A Stiffler Sharon G Wright Lottie J Meade June R Williams Lions and Cowboys and no Bengals, thankfully Senior Profile: Tyler Horsley North Adams sweeps Manchester Cheer Championships Indians face tough test in first pre-season scrimmage Senior Profile: Abby Faulkner Seas reflects on second state tournament experience NA’s Harper signs to continue hoops career at Rio Grande Hendrickson named Assistant Coach of the Year in Division III girls soccer Take the hint, it’s Thanksgiving time again Small Business Saturday in Adams County Art Council’s newest production will have you ‘laughing through your tears’ North Adams students working to help the homeless Grateful Richard A Graham #SawyerStrong Billy L Smalley With some help from Adams County, Ohio Statehouse now has wheelchair charging station Wenstrup announces re-election campaign Delta Dental provides two local schools with new drinking fountains Ernie McFarland honored by Ohio Bankers League Veterans Day parade, ceremony held in West Union Adams County schools celebrate Veterans Day Being the change November: As Mr. Seas it Protecting Ohio seniors from rising healthcare costs It’s November-have some soup and pie SHAC Boys Preview is Nov. 24 at Peebles June Hall Alice B Himes Claudia U Mitchell TRAFFIC ALERT: SR 41 restrictions set for Saturday Jewell Foster Senior Profile: Nicholas Fish SHAC Girls Preview set for Nov. 17 Senior Profile: Lakyn Hupp

Opening the door for high-tech jobs

Temporarily working out of a classroom at the old Bentonville School, the newly hired trainees of Artectis learn the ins and outs of high-tech jobs that have made their way to Adams County.


Tech company believes rural communities can compete for outsourced jobs –

Story and photos by Patricia Beech –

Could high-tech jobs currently outsourced to India be successfully transplanted to rural areas like Adams County?
Two men think it’s not only possible, but probable – and the bottom line – highly profitable.
C.L. “Skip” Wagner and Zane Mingee, both Manchester natives, have entered an agreement with a Cincinnati-based computer-server company to train local residents to do high-tech jobs currently being done by workers in other countries.
“Jobs coming to Adams County is amazing news,” says Wagner in an exclusive interview with The Defender. “And, the fact that they’re pretty advanced, high-tech jobs takes it to a whole other level.”
Wagner, a computer whiz kid and high school drop out who by the age of 17 was traveling the world working as an Integration Engineer for a computer service company, now holds the position of Business Development Manager in Mingee’s company, Artectis.
Over 80% of Artectis clients are big data analytics companies who collect data and use it for market research that allows them to target online advertisements that will generate more traffic to their business websites. The data gathered by these companies is stored on servers which are maintained and supported by Artectis.
“One of our long-time clients was paying a company in another country for server maintenance, and the support they were getting was really horrible even though they were paying them quite a lot of money,” said Wagner. “So I pitched a radical idea to them – let Artectis find and train local people who can take over as your support team.”
Wagner admits the company was skeptical about their ability to produce a competitive workforce.
“I explained we were both from a place where the average annual income per household in the 2010 census was $16,750,” he said. “After a lot of prodding from myself and Zane, they finally agreed that if we trained the people and matched the price they were currently paying, they’d let us have the work.”
Wagner says that many Americans buy into the myth that people in other countries work for pennies on the hour. “That isn’t the reality,” he says. “I can hire a programmer in India for $15 an hour, but I’d rather hire someone here in Adams County, especially with the closing of the power plants and the loss of millions in tax-based revenue – we need to explore every avenue and ask ourselves what we have to offer that no one else does – a work force that’s eager to work.”

These workers are the beginning of a new tech company in Adams County, Artectis. From left, C.L. “Skip” Wagner, Ray Littleton, Kamen Monroe, Mark Monroe, Kyle Monroe, Shawna Ballingee, Damien Morgan, and Zane Mingee.

After conducting over 150 interviews, Mingee and Wagner chose nine local people for the training program.
“We’ve got a class full of folks who, honestly at the start of training knew very little about what this industry is about, or how to do any of the work they are now doing on a daily basis,” says Wagner.  “They’re figuring out problems on their own in very complex systems that two weeks ago they had no concept of.”
According to Wagner, the trainees are learning how networks function, how to repair servers, how to modify and migrate data between servers, how to monitor servers and spot problems, and how to configure new servers for new clients.
“I wasn’t at all familiar with Linux systems, and they took a chance on me,” says trainee Shawna Ballingee. “Doing this training from the base up has demonstrated that these are learnable skills that don’t require a strong base knowledge,”
“I see a great future for these technology-based jobs in this area,” said Ray Littleton who was chosen to participate in the training program. A former FedEx employee, Littleton say he spent three hours a day commuting to and from work. “Normally, to get this type of job you’d have to drive for a couple of hours, I think it’s great they’re bringing this work here.”
“People do not put much faith in folks from Appalachia, but people here are some of the most hard-working and honest people in the world,” says Wagner. “They’ve just never been able to get a fair shake at things and many opportunities have simply never been here.  We want to change that and we believe with the scale of the economies in areas like Adams County, many, many more corporations will move to models like this.
“We’re leading the charge and we’ve managed to figure out a way to make this work on all levels – the talent, the training, the pure business of it all, and the dollars and cents.”

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