Marvin Setty Richard G Waldron Grand Marshals selected for West Union Fourth of July Parade Adams County, Maysville Vet team up to save injured dog Michael S Knauff Victor P Price Success builds from the bottom up Finalists named for 2017 Fair Queen Contest William Glenn DeWine, Reader Call For Tips in Rhoden Murder Investigation MHS principal to take superintendent post Peebles Skate Park now a reality 2017-18 Fur and Feather Ambassadors named Caley Grooms is Cattlemen’s Beef Ambassador Dr. Mueller leaving Health Department’s free clinic Hourglass Quilt Barn returning to Adams County Lung, Thornburg are First Team All-District selections North Adams hosts annual Boys Basketball Camps Walk-off winner Wanda Hill George D Johnson Life can be a juggling act My favorite thing to do on the farm Wolves in Adams County! Ronald L Wedmore Three lessons from Dad Donald D Morgan Wenstrup uninjured in Virginia shooting Portman staff to hold grant funding workshop Raymond E Applegate Keeping the Peebles tradition alive Back on the hardwood, local hoops squads compete in Monday Night League Seven county athletes recognized as All-SHAC Baseball honorees Stepping to the podium Lady Hounds host Youth Volleyball Camp Senior Profile: Bryan Young Junior Deputy Boot Camps kick off in Manchester Hayes pleads “not guilty” to 109 counts Six-year-old girl finds long-lost class ring Jefferson Alumni awards annual scholarships Paul Tate Jr Marcus I Cox Jewell Gill James M Hill Jr Jeffrey S Jones Samuel A Disher Jack Sterling BREAKING NEWS: Parents face charges after son overdoses on opiate License Hikes and Tall Turkey Tales Danger under every rock Reigning Miss Ohio USA will judge 2017 Adams County Fair Queen Pageant Gordley’s hoops career will continue at Mount St. Joseph Russell C Newman Kenneth C Thurman George Uebel Summer Reading Program underway Honor Flight carries local veteran to DC When rescuers become victims Passing the torch, West Union hosts week-long basketball camp for future Dragons SENIOR PROFILE: Sara Knechtly Terry L Powell Willie Shreffler James C Fitzpatrick Senior Profile: Austin Parks Six countians named to All-SHAC Softball squad Lady Indians get summer camp season underway Memorial Day services pay tribute to local veterans WUHS Steel Band will perform at Bogart’s SSCC announces Honors Lists for spring semester Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for final nine weeks West Union Elementary announces Honor Roll for fourth nine weeks Back to State! Mom calls daughter “living proof” seat belts save lives Rent-2-Own donation means new soccer scoreboard at WUHS NAHS student selected for Engineering Summer Camp Southern Hills Athletic Conferences honors Spring Sports athletes Senior Profile: Kailyn Boyd Madison Welch receives Riffle Scholarship Junior Achievement Volunteers visit county’s seventh graders Marcella J Abbott James Ratliff Gladys Davitz Harry G Shupert Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley

When spring becomes a promise

By Rick Houser –

All my life I have wondered to myself just why the earth becomes colorless, cold, and stark in winter. Just why after all the trees had just turned so brilliant in the splendor of their colors did the world have to become a black and white habitat? Maybe I have finally stumbled upon an answer I can accept.
That answer is so when as winter ends and spring nears our planet begins warming up and color begins its’ return, albeit ever so gradually. When we get temperatures in a warming trend and our days slowly become longer we can see the first signs that the time of year I dislike the most is headed to its end. From my earliest recollections and even to this day the signs are visible and there for all to see. One just has to look very close.
When the crocus pops through the ground, time is brief until a colorful bloom is seen. If one is lucky a hyacinth probably is near and all you have to do to find it is sniff the air as the hyacinth gives off a perfumed fragrance almost impossible to ignore and its bloom is so pretty to see also along with the crocus.
Along with these plants is also the pussy willow tree that might well be the first part of Mother Nature to bud out and fill with  white buds from head to toe. Although not the prettiest bloom on display, there has always been something about them that draws us into appreciating their efforts in pleasing our eyes. I know as a little boy we would cut several branches from the pussy willow and put them on display in a quart mason jar and if left in the sun long enough the cuttings would begin sprouting new roots allowing me to have new sets to plant. This worked as a nice present for my Mom and a science project for me and more future plumage in our yard. A win win for the entire family you might say.
In the early blooming foliage there was one more that I still have in my yard and if I think of it I still will cut some of the blooms and take them to my wife as a surprise. That is the blooms from the Forsythia bush, a shrub that prolifically produces bright yellow blooms for two to almost three weeks. These also will, if conditions are good, sprout new roots giving you new sets for your yard. Now the good thing about the Forsythia is no matter how bad a gardener you might be or how hard you try to kill this shrub, I feel very safe in saying it can’t be done. I have tried both ways and have failed.
I’m sure there might be some more early bloomers that arrive before the Red Bud and the dogwood but since I can’t recall them I will continue to attempt making my point. In late February or early March our world begins its slow movement toward spring which I personally feel is the prettiest time of the year. As the colors return into our daily lives we all begin to awaken and mentally we become more alive and begin looking and waiting for  more of spring to appear. The world stuns us as it moves from colorless to Mother Nature’s gradual painting all around us.
Looking back I remember when plants such as the Forsythia bloomed and I would be at my grandmother’s house and she would see to it that she picked a big handful of them for me to take back home to give to my Mom. Whenever I was at Grandma’s house she always helped me pick a bouquet of flowers that were in bloom at the time for me to take to Mom. (I think a bunch of flowers would help me get out of any trouble I might be in and that was usually the case.)
The first of every spring I looked forward to taking flowers to my Mom who always seemed to be very glad I had thought to do this for her. Something as simple as a handful of blooms can and did become a habit I seemed to form and to a smaller degree I still have. When blooms appear I will often pick a couple and take into the kitchen for my wife. Now that I am thinking about it I probably should pick them for my wife more since hot water might still be where my feet end up quite often.
Along the way I have taught my daughter and son to pick flowers for their Mom. Anything from roses to wild flowers is always appreciated. Even my two oldest grandsons have helped me pick some blooms to take to their Mimi and their Mom. One is never too young to learn that the colorful beauty that Mother Nature has blessed us with can and is appreciated by all.
Just how much extra time does it take to gather the splendors that awaken us when the world becomes alive again? With the blooming comes the promise that spring will not be far behind and it is time prepare yourself to enjoy all that is ahead for each and every one of us. I know I am more than over the Christmas holidays and the Super Bowl and even President’s Day. Maybe I will find some pansies and plant them in our old wheelbarrow to speed up the transition from the dead of winter to the pleasant days of spring and then enjoy them as I wait for Easter.

Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and loves to share stories about his youth and other topics. He may be reached at houser734@yahoo.com.

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