What we are made of When summer really arrived Horse project 4-H members head to Ohio State Fair Defender hosts annual Cornhole Tournament George’s Brave Shave’ benefits other Year of planning, work pays off for 2017 fair Local teen opens new business Why can’t you stop? Camp first step in preparation for 2018 Greyhounds on the gridiron Young awarded SEDAB Scholarship Fair hosts Hall of Fame broadcaster Peebles goes back-to-back at the Barnyard The sport of goats Massive storms rumble through Ohio Valley James W Morgan Tiffany R Edwards Marshall W Groves Fairgoers wanna iguana! SSCC moving forward with plans for Adams County campus Mary Wallingford Leslie V Lawrence Jr Fair hosts Cheerleading Competition Peebles FFA installs 2017-18 Officers Adams County Fair Baby Contest Seniors Citizens and Armed Forces Day at the fair Cheers! It’s mocktail time! North Adams Beta Club attends National Convention at Disney ‘You won’t believe the chaos it rains around you’ McCarty’s receive 4-H Alumni award McKayla Raines crowned 2017 Junior Fair Queen Eastern knocks off Peebles 10-5 to capture 14 U baseball tourney Just listen for the answer Time to teach a little History Fair hosts Little Miss and Mister, Toddler shows Jason E Palmer Dorothy Stephenson Shane G Varney The weekend I joined the Army David Stutz Patty Davis Battle results in new chief at the Division of Wildlife Join in with ‘Adams County Rocks’ After 500-mile journey, pigeon ‘drops’ in for a visit Nine-run third inning leads Peebles to upset win in SHYL 12U baseball tournament finals Willie L White David A Presley Connie Greene Carolyn Belczyk retiring from OSU Extension Young’s reign as Fair Queen ends, new journey begins Robert L Boone Esther C Malone Independence Day parade puts patriotism on display Being an addict’s mom: a sad and scary place to be White House newest addition to People’s Defender mailing list Young leaving Manchester to become Ripley Principal Leadoff homer holds up, Manchester takes 10U softball tourney 1-0 over North Adams North Adams tops Manchester in 12U semis Monday Night League concludes with SHAC showdown How we see ourselves In the good ole’ summertime Ronnie L Roush Elizabeth A Gifford Tom White Ivan H Copas Kathleen Lewis Paul Minton Jessica A Edmisten Workhouse helps free up jail space Penguin ‘chills’ with kids in library visit ‘Heroin has taken me to my darkest places’ The beauty of the giant combine West Union gets past North Adams 5-2 in 10U baseball tourney play Eastern Brown hosts annual Girls Soccer Shootout “It’s been a real community effort” Summer ball winds down for local squads Submit your Knothole team photos! Gokey, Morgan, Young to perform at 2017 Festival of the Bells Just looking around the room When in the course of human events When your dreams seem out of reach Ricky A Smith Ricky A Smith Dean McClellan Ruby O Shell Peggy R Atkinson Caroline E Fulton Marcia R Baldwin Juanita N Lewis Mary K Hilterbran Jack D Reed ‘I had no gumption except to get high’ Long-lost siblings meet for the first time after nearly six decades apart Freedom Festival to honor the American Flag ‘Music and Memory’ at Adams County Manor renews lives lost to dementia Adams County Sheriff’s Deputy takes gold at 2017 Ohio Police and Fire Games Toole awarded Winchester Alumni Scholarship Lady Devils host Summer Varsity Shootout In 14U, Peebles finishes regular season with blowout win Der professionelle Basketball-Traum Local pair attend Wabash College Wrestling Camp

When spring becomes a promise

By Rick Houser –

All my life I have wondered to myself just why the earth becomes colorless, cold, and stark in winter. Just why after all the trees had just turned so brilliant in the splendor of their colors did the world have to become a black and white habitat? Maybe I have finally stumbled upon an answer I can accept.
That answer is so when as winter ends and spring nears our planet begins warming up and color begins its’ return, albeit ever so gradually. When we get temperatures in a warming trend and our days slowly become longer we can see the first signs that the time of year I dislike the most is headed to its end. From my earliest recollections and even to this day the signs are visible and there for all to see. One just has to look very close.
When the crocus pops through the ground, time is brief until a colorful bloom is seen. If one is lucky a hyacinth probably is near and all you have to do to find it is sniff the air as the hyacinth gives off a perfumed fragrance almost impossible to ignore and its bloom is so pretty to see also along with the crocus.
Along with these plants is also the pussy willow tree that might well be the first part of Mother Nature to bud out and fill with  white buds from head to toe. Although not the prettiest bloom on display, there has always been something about them that draws us into appreciating their efforts in pleasing our eyes. I know as a little boy we would cut several branches from the pussy willow and put them on display in a quart mason jar and if left in the sun long enough the cuttings would begin sprouting new roots allowing me to have new sets to plant. This worked as a nice present for my Mom and a science project for me and more future plumage in our yard. A win win for the entire family you might say.
In the early blooming foliage there was one more that I still have in my yard and if I think of it I still will cut some of the blooms and take them to my wife as a surprise. That is the blooms from the Forsythia bush, a shrub that prolifically produces bright yellow blooms for two to almost three weeks. These also will, if conditions are good, sprout new roots giving you new sets for your yard. Now the good thing about the Forsythia is no matter how bad a gardener you might be or how hard you try to kill this shrub, I feel very safe in saying it can’t be done. I have tried both ways and have failed.
I’m sure there might be some more early bloomers that arrive before the Red Bud and the dogwood but since I can’t recall them I will continue to attempt making my point. In late February or early March our world begins its slow movement toward spring which I personally feel is the prettiest time of the year. As the colors return into our daily lives we all begin to awaken and mentally we become more alive and begin looking and waiting for  more of spring to appear. The world stuns us as it moves from colorless to Mother Nature’s gradual painting all around us.
Looking back I remember when plants such as the Forsythia bloomed and I would be at my grandmother’s house and she would see to it that she picked a big handful of them for me to take back home to give to my Mom. Whenever I was at Grandma’s house she always helped me pick a bouquet of flowers that were in bloom at the time for me to take to Mom. (I think a bunch of flowers would help me get out of any trouble I might be in and that was usually the case.)
The first of every spring I looked forward to taking flowers to my Mom who always seemed to be very glad I had thought to do this for her. Something as simple as a handful of blooms can and did become a habit I seemed to form and to a smaller degree I still have. When blooms appear I will often pick a couple and take into the kitchen for my wife. Now that I am thinking about it I probably should pick them for my wife more since hot water might still be where my feet end up quite often.
Along the way I have taught my daughter and son to pick flowers for their Mom. Anything from roses to wild flowers is always appreciated. Even my two oldest grandsons have helped me pick some blooms to take to their Mimi and their Mom. One is never too young to learn that the colorful beauty that Mother Nature has blessed us with can and is appreciated by all.
Just how much extra time does it take to gather the splendors that awaken us when the world becomes alive again? With the blooming comes the promise that spring will not be far behind and it is time prepare yourself to enjoy all that is ahead for each and every one of us. I know I am more than over the Christmas holidays and the Super Bowl and even President’s Day. Maybe I will find some pansies and plant them in our old wheelbarrow to speed up the transition from the dead of winter to the pleasant days of spring and then enjoy them as I wait for Easter.

Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and loves to share stories about his youth and other topics. He may be reached at houser734@yahoo.com.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© The People's Defender - All rights reserved