Alice B Himes Claudia U Mitchell TRAFFIC ALERT: SR 41 restrictions set for Saturday Jewell Foster Senior Profile: Nicholas Fish SHAC Girls Preview set for Nov. 17 Senior Profile: Lakyn Hupp Again, Lady Devils ousted in district finals ‘Lighting the Serpent’ event is being discontinued Voters favor incumbents at the ballot Arts Council dedicates Buzzardroost Rock mural Heroes in disguise Fighting for future generations in OH2 A few puffs of smoke, and a happy ending Lois Wilson Helen M Hesler Jerry L Dickson Ohio’s Traditional Deer-Gun Hunting Season begins Nov. 27 WWII veteran honored in banner raising ceremony Veteran of three wars honored for volunteer work Charlotte Evans Jason A Barr Why we celebrate Manchester man killed in single-car accident Adams County Election Results – 2017 Hubert Knauff To keep or not to keep Time again for the changing of the seasons November proclaimed as Adoption Recognition and Recruitment Month Local business is seven decades old and counting Local student gets Nashville call Senior Profile: Gabe Grooms Lady Indians fall in districts Quest For The Cup complete for Dragons Meeting a true sports hero WU’s McCarty named District Player of the Year With regional run, Pennywitt completes memorable career West Union eighth grade volleyball finishes as SHAC runner-up Senior Profile: Tray Brand Greyhounds drop home finale, finish at 4-6 Lady Devils fall in district semis Devils go down in district finals Matt Seas headed back to State XC Meet Senior Profile: Charlee Louden Lady Indians ousted in sectional final Lady Devils down Minford 4-1 in district semis North Adams volleyball claims fourth consecutive sectional crown Senior Profile: Brooklyn Howlett Afterschool fun begins at NAES Wearing it pink in October Kenneth L Austin Jay E Minnich Reuben E Hershberger Bobby L Williams 18 years just isn’t long enough Emotional, historic, and victorious Taking action against addiction Utilities commission approves DP&L electric security plan What matters and what doesn’t Oh dear, is that a deer? Junior Gaffin Charlotte J Thatcher Matthew D Miller Megan R Phillips Ralph M Swearingen Linda C Ackley Robert Ralston Shelly Seaman Increased access to treatment, Improving economic opportunity keys to combating Ohio’s Opioid Crisis Seas siblings are again SHAC Cross-Country Champions Lady Hounds cruise to sectional victory Senior Profile: Alyssa Hoskins 101 and another sectional championship Lady Indians claim sectional title North Adams tops Peebles for sectional soccer crown Senior Profile: Shay Boldman 13.5 seconds, heartbreak for West Union PHS JV Volleyball completes unbeaten season On the course that Nicklaus helped design On the ballot: Meigs Township Trustees West Union Christian Church will again be collection center for Operation Christmas Child Peebles voters will choose council members in upcoming election Seven candidates seek seats on ACOVSD school board A time for transformation What will future generations say? Finding all those treasures Janet K Campbell Robert D Hill Lady Devils blank West Union 7-0 in SHAC soccer finale Vikings invade and conquer the Greyhounds Outpouring of community support for local business woman with cancer Manchester mourns teen killed in single-car crash Kylie S Lucas Sharon R Grooms Steven L Wootten Forest J McDaniel Ralph O Grooms Adams County teenager dies in auto accident Charles N Vance Wesley M Baldwin

Commissioners meet in Columbus with DP&L CEO Tom Raga

Adams County Commissioners Brian Baldridge, Diane Ward, and Ty Pell met on Feb. 22 with the CEO of Dayton Power and Light to discuss all of the ramifications of the company closing two local power plants.

Looking for answers, Commissioners put county’s concerns front and center at statehouse meeting –

By Patricia Beech –

Adams County Commissioners Brian Baldridge, Diane Ward, and Ty Pell met on Wednesday, Feb. 22 with DP&L Chief Executive Officer Tom Raga and state leaders to discuss the closing of the Killen and J.M. Stuart Plants. The commissioners were joined by Adams County Economic Development Director Holly Johnson and Prosecuting Attorney David Kelley.
“We asked for this meeting so we could express our deep concerns about the plant closings in our county,” the Commissioners said in a joint statement released to The Defender. “We made an impassioned plea to those in attendance to make changes to the current planned closings to protect the thousands of Adams County families who will be hurt by this action.”
The plants, which employ approximately 700 local people, are slated for closure in June 2018 if the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO) approves DP&L’s Electric Security Plan.
The Commissioners said they will continue to push for every available solution to change the timetable of the closings and find alternate job sources for those who are affected.
In addition to the loss of 700 jobs, the county stands to lose over $8 million dollars in tax revenue and the Manchester School District will see their yearly budget cut by nearly 55% when the two coal-fired plants are shuttered.
“We understand the worries and fears of our friends, families, and neighbors who will be affected by the plant closings,” the Commissioners said.  “We won’t rest until we can address and hopefully resolve these concerns.”
The Commissioners said they discussed not only the economic impact of the closures, but also the plants’ progress through decommissioning, remediation, and redevelopment.
A lack of information concerning DP&L’s plans for clean-up at the site has led to worries that the county could be left with a “brownfield”, a term used to describe land which was previously used for industrial or commercial purposes that is now contaminated with toxins and poisons.
According to the EPA, there are more than 450,000 “brownfields across the U.S. because there are no legal requirements for demolishing old power plants. Companies typically choose not to spend significant money to decommission them. Across America, retired generating plants have been left abandoned for years or decades, and their capped ash ponds frequently create environmental disasters for local communities. The cost of clean up for those communities runs in the tens of millions of dollars.
The Sierra Club, a principal player in the move away from coal, contends that people living within one mile of unlined coal ash ponds can have a 1 in 50 risk of cancer—more than 2,000 times higher than what the EPA considers acceptable.
Coal ash contains arsenic, lead, mercury, and selenium, as well as aluminum, barium, boron, and chlorine. All can be toxic, and all can be found in the ash ponds of retired coal-fired power plants.
Ash ponds fall into a dangerous regulatory gap since Ohio has no laws designating companies to be financially responsible for covering all the costs of closing and maintaining their toxic ponds.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© The People's Defender - All rights reserved