Junior Fair BBQ again a big success Beulah B James Senior Profile: Josie Myers Lady Indians place second at Ohio Classic in Hillsboro MVCA dominates Greyhounds in 45-0 triumph For Lady Devils, SHAC streak goes to 55 matches 9/11: Sixteen years later Gertrude Gibson Defender Bowl coming Sept. 16 Joyce A Walker Virginia R Young Senior Profile: Abby Campton West Union hosts 2017 Dragon Run New gridiron history begins for Peebles Trout, fire, and blueberry fields forever Senior Profile: Baylee Justice Lady Devils win SHAC thriller at Eastern Brown From Blue Creek to the Beaneaters Tough loss for Greyhounds in season opener Turning tragedy into hope What we learn from failure Absolutely had to get the wrinkles out Frances S Kidder Leo Trotter 41st Bentonville Festival set to begin Sept. 8 Winchester celebrates its history during three-day street fair Cruisefest returning to streets of Peebles Blue Creek- a community in transition honors its history and heritage Cuteness Galore – Winchester Homecoming Festival Baby Show Ronnie L Day Cast your vote for the Adams County Fairgrounds Nelson E Atkinson Ryan L Colvin Richard Tackett William L Tadlock Penny Pollard Wendell Beasley West Union soccer drops pair at Mason County Lady Indians go down in straight sets Senior Profile: Michael Gill Senior Profile: Katie Sandlin Royals dominate in big win over North Adams Dragons continue County Cup domination Archaeology Day returns to Serpent Mound Hourglass Quilt Square is back up again Manchester family hosts International Guests History, farming, and family- the bedrock of Cherry Fork’s community Bus drivers, emergency responders prepare for coming school year Working up a real good sweat What’s behind the motive? Rondal R Bailey Jr Thelma J Yates She’s all grown up now Scott A Yeager Soccer talent on display at 2017 SHAC preview Baseball community mourns the loss of Gene Bennett Winchester Homecoming Festival is Aug 25-27 Eleanor P Tumbleson Felicity man killed in Ohio River boating accident WUHS golfers take Portsmouth Invitational It was pretty cold that day Volleyball kicks off with SHAC Preview Night Young awarded Women’s Western Golf Foundation Scholarship One Mistake Senator Portman visits GE Test Facility in Peebles Adams County school districts facing some major challenges for the coming year Family, friends, and roots: the ties that bind residents of one Adams County village What is your strength? Just the chance to take a look back Ronnie L Wolford Dale J Marshall Herbert Purvis Great American Solar Eclipse coming Aug. 21 BREAKING NEWS: West Union wins fifth consecutive County Cup Wallace B Boden John L Fletcher Lady Indians golfers learning the links North Adams, West Union golfers open 2017 seasons This Labor Day, ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Blanton announces candicacy for Court of Appeals Local student attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders MHS welcomes new principal Made in America When it feels like you’re spinning plates Bonfires and “building” a farm Lady Devils looking to take that next step 50 years of Bengal memories Ag Society delivers donation to Dragonfly Foundation Young Memorial Scholarship awarded to a pair of local seniors ‘Musical passion is in his blood’ Naylor named NAHS Principal Boldman retiring after 17 years as Homeless Shelter director Manchester concludes another River Days celebration Drug Treatment vs. Prison James R Brown Bobby Lawler Jr Adams County man charged with killing estranged girlfriend Lexie N Hopkins Volleyball, soccer previews coming this weekend Michael A Cheek

One thing to remember this President’s Day

By Congressman Brad Wenstrup –

If you walk through the Capitol Rotunda and look up, you will see “The
Apotheosis of Washington.” This beautiful work of art graces the dome
180 feet above the rotunda floor and covers 4,664 square feet. It
depicts George Washington ascending into the clouds, surrounded by the
goddesses of Victory and Liberty and 13 maidens representing the 13
colonies.

While it’s a stunning piece of art with great historical significance,
I can’t help but imagine George Washington chuckling a bit if he saw
it. Because at the end of the day, Washington — the first U.S.
president and commander-in-chief of the Continental Army during the
American Revolutionary War — was a humble man. He was keenly aware of
the weight of his responsibilities, but never seemed to take himself too
seriously. His life was service-oriented.

There’s a story I like that illustrates how Washington was always
acting on behalf of others. One day, he was riding by a group of
soldiers as they were struggling to raise a beam while building some
structures during the Revolutionary War. The corporal in charge was
shouting encouragement, but still the troops struggled to hoist the beam
high enough. After watching quietly for moment, George Washington asked
the corporal why he did not help his men. The man snapped back: “Do
you realize I am the corporal, sir?” I imagine Washington smiling as
he responded politely, “I beg your pardon, Mr. Corporal, I did,”
before dismounting and adding his strength to raise the beam.

WASHINGTON UNDERSTOOD WHAT FEW IN HIS NAMESAKE CITY TODAY SEEM TO GRASP:
LEADERS ARE HERE TO SERVE. I witnessed this truth firsthand during my
service in Iraq and in the U.S. Army Reserves. The greatest leaders are
the ones who keep their egos in check and who put the needs of the
troops they lead above their own.

I believe that type of servant-leadership is a critical linchpin to the
government framework that those early American patriots envisioned. The
founders structured our system of government so that leaders would be
democratically elected from among the people, to represent the people.
Unlike England at the time, American government officials would not be
pre-selected by their royal bloodlines or distinguished lineages.
Instead, they would be ordinary citizens: small business owners,
soldiers, farmers, preachers, and teachers, who put aside their careers
for public service. That’s why when young people come up to me and
tell me they want to serve in Congress, I always reply, “That’s
wonderful, but do something else first.”

Most importantly, our founders carefully structured our democratic
republic so that ultimate responsibility rested on the shoulders of the
people themselves. Elected officials would serve the will of the people
– not the other way around. Abraham Lincoln called it, “government
of the people, by the people, for the people.”

It may seem like a basic truth, but it is one that bears repeating.
Personally, it’s a big part of why I serve in Congress. Having spent
most of my life serving as a doctor, small business owner, and combat
surgeon in Iraq, I felt called to continue that service in the U.S.
House of Representatives in order to bring the voices of my neighbors,
small business owners, and fellow veterans and physicians, to the halls
of Congress. Because, at the end of the day, the voices of every day
Americans are the ones that matter most.

That’s why getting your feedback is such a big priority of mine.
Whether it’s through meetings, emails, weekly polls, telephone town
halls, or the hundreds of calls my offices receive every day, I
appreciate everyone who takes time to share their opinion with me.
Because your voices matter. As another great American president, Ronald
Reagan, once said, “’We the People are the driver – the Government
is the car.”

After Washington died, President’s Day was established as a perennial
remembrance of his life and leadership. Over the years, the holiday has
expanded to honor all past American presidents. It’s a day when we
reflect on all the individuals who served as leaders of the free world
and defenders of our great republic, and who have left indelible marks
on our national history. As we commemorate President’s Day, though,
let us not forget the truth that George Washington’s example reminds
us of: that our leaders are here to serve. THE GREATEST VOICE SHAPING
OUR NATION OVER THE COURSE OF ITS 238-YEAR HISTORY HAS ALWAYS BEEN –
AND MUST ALWAYS BE – THE VOICE OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE.

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