Winchester- How an interstate highway changed the face of one small town Facebook – a growing marketplace for local entrepreneurs When kids know best Giving some love to those dog days Junior Fair BBQ again a big success Beulah B James Senior Profile: Josie Myers Lady Indians place second at Ohio Classic in Hillsboro MVCA dominates Greyhounds in 45-0 triumph For Lady Devils, SHAC streak goes to 55 matches 9/11: Sixteen years later Gertrude Gibson Defender Bowl coming Sept. 16 Joyce A Walker Virginia R Young Senior Profile: Abby Campton West Union hosts 2017 Dragon Run New gridiron history begins for Peebles Trout, fire, and blueberry fields forever Senior Profile: Baylee Justice Lady Devils win SHAC thriller at Eastern Brown From Blue Creek to the Beaneaters Tough loss for Greyhounds in season opener Turning tragedy into hope What we learn from failure Absolutely had to get the wrinkles out Frances S Kidder Leo Trotter 41st Bentonville Festival set to begin Sept. 8 Winchester celebrates its history during three-day street fair Cruisefest returning to streets of Peebles Blue Creek- a community in transition honors its history and heritage Cuteness Galore – Winchester Homecoming Festival Baby Show Ronnie L Day Cast your vote for the Adams County Fairgrounds Nelson E Atkinson Ryan L Colvin Richard Tackett William L Tadlock Penny Pollard Wendell Beasley West Union soccer drops pair at Mason County Lady Indians go down in straight sets Senior Profile: Michael Gill Senior Profile: Katie Sandlin Royals dominate in big win over North Adams Dragons continue County Cup domination Archaeology Day returns to Serpent Mound Hourglass Quilt Square is back up again Manchester family hosts International Guests History, farming, and family- the bedrock of Cherry Fork’s community Bus drivers, emergency responders prepare for coming school year Working up a real good sweat What’s behind the motive? Rondal R Bailey Jr Thelma J Yates She’s all grown up now Scott A Yeager Soccer talent on display at 2017 SHAC preview Baseball community mourns the loss of Gene Bennett Winchester Homecoming Festival is Aug 25-27 Eleanor P Tumbleson Felicity man killed in Ohio River boating accident WUHS golfers take Portsmouth Invitational It was pretty cold that day Volleyball kicks off with SHAC Preview Night Young awarded Women’s Western Golf Foundation Scholarship One Mistake Senator Portman visits GE Test Facility in Peebles Adams County school districts facing some major challenges for the coming year Family, friends, and roots: the ties that bind residents of one Adams County village What is your strength? Just the chance to take a look back Ronnie L Wolford Dale J Marshall Herbert Purvis Great American Solar Eclipse coming Aug. 21 BREAKING NEWS: West Union wins fifth consecutive County Cup Wallace B Boden John L Fletcher Lady Indians golfers learning the links North Adams, West Union golfers open 2017 seasons This Labor Day, ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Blanton announces candicacy for Court of Appeals Local student attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders MHS welcomes new principal Made in America When it feels like you’re spinning plates Bonfires and “building” a farm Lady Devils looking to take that next step 50 years of Bengal memories Ag Society delivers donation to Dragonfly Foundation Young Memorial Scholarship awarded to a pair of local seniors ‘Musical passion is in his blood’ Naylor named NAHS Principal Boldman retiring after 17 years as Homeless Shelter director Manchester concludes another River Days celebration Drug Treatment vs. Prison James R Brown Bobby Lawler Jr

As plants power down, community must step up

The imminent closing of the local power plants will need community involvement to help through the transition period.

Local leaders continue to fight for fair settlement for Adams County –

Story by Patricia Beech –
Photo by Mark Carpenter –

DP&L’s decision to shutter Adams County’s coal-fired power plants continues to fuel growing concerns about the potential economic impact the closings will have on local communities and institutions.
The DP&L settlement plan, now being considered by the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio (PUCO), will not only raise customer rates, but also force closure of the Killen and Stuart power plants, resulting in the loss of hundreds of jobs and a steep reduction in tax revenues – both of which threaten the county’s economic stability.
Local officials, without benefit of specialized, high-powered attorneys, are navigating unfamiliar territory in their attempts to make certain that Adams County’s interests are considered in the DP&L settlement.
In late January Adams County Prosecutor David Kelley and local attorney Dana N. Whalen filed a Motion to Intervene in the settlement hearings on behalf of Adams County and five other entities including the Ohio Valley Local School District, the Manchester Local School District, Monroe Township, and Sprigg Township.
The Motion to Intervene focused on the potential economic impact  that PUCO’s decision would have on “current and future tax revenues generated from DP&L” and stated that those concerned “want to make sure the interest and rights of the residents are properly heard, considered, and protected throughout these proceedings.”
The question concerning local leaders is how to ensure that Adams County, with its unique dependence on coal, will not have to face decades of economic instability and recovery after the plants are shut down.
The county is not alone in dealing with this issue. Coal dependent communities across Ohio and the nation are working to find sustainable solutions allowing for a smooth transition away from coal-based economies.
According to the Delta Institute, a nonprofit organization focused on energy, ecosystems, and waste solutions, “A community’s ability to make a successful transition is increased when planning begins early in the process, even before a coal plant closes, coal shipments cease, or the coal ash pond is capped.”
Most communities successfully transitioning away from coal dependent economies have engaged every level of government, business, and local community members in the process.
Having that broad-base of support and an effective transition planning process empowers and engages community members invested in a successful outcome.
According to James Kotcon, an Energy Committee Sierra Club Chairman, “Where communities have come together and tried to plan their future, successes happen,” he says, adding “Where there have been problems is where the community is not participating. The board of directors out in some other state makes a decision and you wake up one morning and the gate is closed.”

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