Marvin Setty Richard G Waldron Grand Marshals selected for West Union Fourth of July Parade Adams County, Maysville Vet team up to save injured dog Michael S Knauff Victor P Price Success builds from the bottom up Finalists named for 2017 Fair Queen Contest William Glenn DeWine, Reader Call For Tips in Rhoden Murder Investigation MHS principal to take superintendent post Peebles Skate Park now a reality 2017-18 Fur and Feather Ambassadors named Caley Grooms is Cattlemen’s Beef Ambassador Dr. Mueller leaving Health Department’s free clinic Hourglass Quilt Barn returning to Adams County Lung, Thornburg are First Team All-District selections North Adams hosts annual Boys Basketball Camps Walk-off winner Wanda Hill George D Johnson Life can be a juggling act My favorite thing to do on the farm Wolves in Adams County! Ronald L Wedmore Three lessons from Dad Donald D Morgan Wenstrup uninjured in Virginia shooting Portman staff to hold grant funding workshop Raymond E Applegate Keeping the Peebles tradition alive Back on the hardwood, local hoops squads compete in Monday Night League Seven county athletes recognized as All-SHAC Baseball honorees Stepping to the podium Lady Hounds host Youth Volleyball Camp Senior Profile: Bryan Young Junior Deputy Boot Camps kick off in Manchester Hayes pleads “not guilty” to 109 counts Six-year-old girl finds long-lost class ring Jefferson Alumni awards annual scholarships Paul Tate Jr Marcus I Cox Jewell Gill James M Hill Jr Jeffrey S Jones Samuel A Disher Jack Sterling BREAKING NEWS: Parents face charges after son overdoses on opiate License Hikes and Tall Turkey Tales Danger under every rock Reigning Miss Ohio USA will judge 2017 Adams County Fair Queen Pageant Gordley’s hoops career will continue at Mount St. Joseph Russell C Newman Kenneth C Thurman George Uebel Summer Reading Program underway Honor Flight carries local veteran to DC When rescuers become victims Passing the torch, West Union hosts week-long basketball camp for future Dragons SENIOR PROFILE: Sara Knechtly Terry L Powell Willie Shreffler James C Fitzpatrick Senior Profile: Austin Parks Six countians named to All-SHAC Softball squad Lady Indians get summer camp season underway Memorial Day services pay tribute to local veterans WUHS Steel Band will perform at Bogart’s SSCC announces Honors Lists for spring semester Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for final nine weeks West Union Elementary announces Honor Roll for fourth nine weeks Back to State! Mom calls daughter “living proof” seat belts save lives Rent-2-Own donation means new soccer scoreboard at WUHS NAHS student selected for Engineering Summer Camp Southern Hills Athletic Conferences honors Spring Sports athletes Senior Profile: Kailyn Boyd Madison Welch receives Riffle Scholarship Junior Achievement Volunteers visit county’s seventh graders Marcella J Abbott James Ratliff Gladys Davitz Harry G Shupert Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley

From Pearl Harbor to ‘America’s Got Talent’, 93-year-old WWII vet is still going strong

Adams County’s own Jim Kimmerly rides in the parade honoring the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Kimmerly, a survivor of the attack, rides here with his daughter Cheryl Kimmerly Dull.

Kimmerly proves it’s never too late to pursue your dreams –

By Patricia Beech –

Wednesday, Dec. 7 marked 75 years since the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor drew the United States into World War II.
On that fateful day, Jim Kimmerly was just an 18-year-old sailor serving aboard the USS Medusa, a repair ship anchored in the northeast corner of the harbor. Even though it has been 75 years, Kimmerly can still recall watching with horror as Japanese warplanes rained bombs around him and his fellow sailors..
“At first, I thought it was a mock battle,” Kimmerly says. “We were  (anchored) pretty close to the USS Utah and the Japanese hit it with  torpedoes over and over until it sank; a cruiser next to us got hit by a bomb and a plane crashed onto it; a light cruiser called the SS Riley was torpedoed, but it didn’t sink. We got bombs dropped all around us, and I saw one torpedo go by.  That’s when I knew it was the real thing.”

93-year old Jim Kimmerly, a survivor of the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, is seen here in front of a Pearl Harbor memorial in his recent visit to Hawaii for the 75th anniversary of the attack.

The attack lasted almost two hours and left 2,403 Americans dead and 1,178 injured. Japan formally declared war on the United States that day. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt urged Congress to declare war on Japan on Dec. 8, 1941, and the vote in favor of war was nearly unanimous.
Kimmerly was one of nearly 80 veterans who recently returned to Pearl Harbor to mark the 75th anniversary of the attack. He and his fellow veterans were the guests of honor throughout the event which culminated with a Memorial Parade.
“Me and my daughter rode on top of a Corvette down Waikiki Beach,” Kimmerly said. “People were lined up four and five deep on both sides of the road, it was something else.”
At 93 Kimmerly seems impervious to the effects of time. It’s difficult to imagine him saying no to a new adventure – whether it’s riding in a parade atop a Corvette down Waikiki Beach, or dancing every weekend at the Eagles in Maysville, or appearing with his clogging group on “America’s Got Talent”.

The next big adventure in Kimmerly’s life kicked off after a video of his dance team, The Fancy Free Cloggers, was uploaded onto YouTube. Producers from “America’s Got Talent” spotted the unique troupe and asked them to come to Chicago to audition for the show.
“We danced in front of some judges first, than in front of an audience, which was taped,” said Kimmerly, who was also asked to make a scripted video.
“They interviewed me and they told me what to say – ‘I’m 93, and I’m a Pearl Harbor survivor, and I am a clogger’.  I don’t know why they made that video, or whether or not they’re going to put it on television.”
Kimmerly says he feels good about the group’s chance of being called back to perform on the TV show.
“I think they’ll call us,” he says, “We won’t know until January, but I’m pretty sure we’re going to get it.”
Kimmerly says he’s always loved dancing, but didn’t have much opportunity to pursue it when he was a young man.
“I started line dancing when I was 68,” he says.  “Then I saw people clogging and I thought I’d like to do that.”

Since he was 72, Jim Kimmerly has been a part of the local Fancy Free Cloggers, and like the rest of the group, is waiting to hear whether or not they will have a spot on “America’s Got Talent.”

He contacted Evie Poe, Director of the Fancy Free Cloggers, and at the age of 72, he began learning how to clog.
Kimmerly says he now dances with the group once or twice a week, and on weekends he can be found “cutting a rug” at the Eagles Club in Maysville, Ky.
If the Fancy Free Cloggers are chosen to perform on “America’s Got Talent”, they will travel to Los Angeles on an all-expense paid trip, including their air fair and hotel rooms.
“If you get first place you win a million dollars,” says Kimmerly with a wink.  “But, it’s just an honor to be asked, and I think if we get on the show, we’ll win – once, I think.”
Whether or not the cloggers are cast on the competitive talent show, Kimmerly is already focused on accomplishing his next big dream. “I’ve always wanted to dance on stage at the Grand Ole Opry,” he says. “And  this show might help me get a little closer to doing that.”

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