Manchester grad enjoys a “Super” Experience Taking Adams County patriotism to the state capitol John P Sininger Jo Ann Hayslip Harvey U Schrock Eunice G. Burgess Senior Profile: Kaulen St Michael Cox Racing returns to Brushcreek on April 2 Southern Hills Athletic Conference holds Winter Sports Awards ceremony Adams County provides multiple walking venues Adams County parks are tobacco-free Rhoads Memorial 5K Run/Walk is April 9 Peebles Elem. Staff of the Month Floyd E Maddy Raymond A Holt Derrick Poe Spencer E McFarland Mintie F Rogers Roberta Eylar Big Time Wrestling coming to NAHS Carl Tomlin CTC students help with storm clean-up Opening the door for high-tech jobs Jack R Slyger Thomas Stratton Jr Eastern Lady Warriors headed to Final Four Senior Profile: Logan Rogers Southern Hills Athletic Conference names 2016-17 All-Conference Basketball Teams Winchester PD continues assault on drugs Alonso joins Defender staff Sheriff to set up outpost in Manchester Johnson named OEDA Membership Chairperson Sherman E Young Ruth Jackman ‘Kitten Season’ comes to Ohio Manchester Council votes to disband PD Olde Wayside Inn under new management Two overdose on heroin Senior Profile: Ethan Parrett Adams/Brown Youth League holds postseason tourney Three nights of pain Furious rally falls short, Lady Devils again eliminated in Div. III district finals, 45-42 Oscar Moore Barbara J Finnegan Ohio Senate and House honor Miss Ohio USA Michael Eldridge Frances Towner Thelma R Williamson BREAKING NEWS: Manchester council votes to eliminate police department Before all dogs go to heaven Adaptive Bikes delivered in Adams County Adams County Junior Fair Market Hog Identification plans announced for 2017 Local couple takes ownership of two local businesses Jo Hanson to retire after nearly 50 years in banking Sierra Club, hero or villain? Greyhounds, Devils are runners-up in SHAC Tournaments Harold L Purdin Senior Profile: Jacob Wickerham 98-year old author publishes first book Early March storm packs destructive punch Jeeps rally in second half to end the Peebles season How about some post season awards? Thanks for all the great sports coverage PHS Principal hopes to expand students’ world view When spring becomes a promise Greg Lorenz Clay shoots the lights out, shoots down Greyhounds’ season Senior Profile: Savannah McFarland Devils put up a good fight, but fall to Portsmouth in sectional final, 50-43 Second half comeback sends Lady Devils to district finals for third straight year Butts honored by Southeast District Athletic Board North Adams Elementary holds Random Acts of Kindness Week Chester W Eyre BREAKING NEWS: March makes its entrance with force WUES kicks off Right to Read Week with guest readers WUHS students see Aronoff show on the life of Edgar Allan Poe Local high school seniors winners of Wendy’s Heisman Awards The emotions of a senior year Market Hog Clinic scheduled for March 4 Venture Hawks fall to Scioto County Senior Profile : Colton Thornburg Lady Dragons’ season ends with sectional loss to Lynchburg Devils advance in tourney with convincing win over West Union, will face Portsmouth for sectional title Wenstrup selected as Vice Chairman of House Armed Services Military Personnel Subcommittee Adams County 4-H Shooting Sports to hold fund raiser Linda M Howland Nellie B Hayslip Russell E Bailey Gladys M Perdue Commissioners meet in Columbus with DP&L CEO Tom Raga Missing the Dirtrollers The farms that aren’t forgotten Flora Hilderbran Commissioners to meet with DP&L officials New state graduation requirements called a ‘train wreck’ Catching up with Keller Senior Profile: Justin Knechtly Piketon size is too much for Lady Indians, Peebles falls in sectional finals Greyhounds grab Senior Night win Indians finish regular season riding six-game winning streak

Remembering 9/11-15 years later

Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.
Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.

Where were you? Readers share their stories –

By Patricia Beech –

Where were you?
Were you at work?  Were you in school? Were you at the grocery or visiting a friend?
Chances are you remember with great clarity exactly where you  were on that cloudless September morning fifteen years ago when the unthinkable happened.
America was attacked.
In a deliberate act of war conducted with chilling precision,  terrorists turned four passenger airliners into  deadly bombs and delivered  death to more than innocent 3,000 Americans.
The brazen and devastating attack left us all stunned and shaken,  struggling to grasp the full scope of the catastrophe. Through that  long day we watched, shattered and paralyzed, as the world we knew  gave way to unspeakable, unimaginable violence and pain.
We all remember that September morning. It is burned indelibly  into the memories of all Americans.
“I was in the eighth grade, sitting in History class, staring at the TV in disbelief and with an overwhelming sense that life as we  knew it was about to change forever,” Lindsay Cline, Public Safety  Communications Manager at UC Health remembers.  “I watched all those  firefighters, EMTs, and police officers rushing in while everyone else  was running out. From that moment I knew I wanted to be in public service. I’m now celebrating my tenth year in EMS.”
“I grew up in Adams County, but I lived in Newport on 9/11. I  remember seeing the TV and thinking it was a movie. When I realized it  wasn’t I grew very scared,” Patty Ryan-Fox, a Team Health employee in  Knoxville TN recalled. “The first thing I thought of was what if they  crashed a plane into the Oak Ridge nuclear plant. I remember calling my  sister , who still lives in Adams county. We were both scared. It was  the first time it crossed my mind that my family was strung out between Ohio and Tennessee. I thought I may never see them again.”
Carisa Kremin, on a business trip for the Honda Corporation when  the towers were hit, remembers: “I was flying from London to Turin, Italy. When we landed airport security met us on the tarmac and asked  if there were any Americans on board. We said we were and they hurried us off the plane and into the airport where Italian soldiers told us  what was happening in the U.S.  We were taken to an American hotel in  Rome.”
“That night CNN was our only connection to home,” Kremin continued. “The news anchors were Italian, so we couldn’t understand them, but we began to piece  the story together.  We watched in horror as they replayed the  attacks. We saw the first plane hit and the people on the street looking up in disbelief and confusion. We saw the second plane hit and we knew it was no accident. We watched the smoke billowing from the scars in the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. Then the towers started to  fall and we saw the people closest to Ground Zero running, terrified,  their faces covered in white dust.”
“We tried to call home, but couldn’t get through. There were no cell phones and all of the land lines into the U.S. were tied up.  There were no flights. All air traffic in and out of the U.S. was  grounded.”
“Even though the Italian people were kind, and sad for us, it was  scary to be outside the country so far from home.”
“We watched as the number of casualties kept rising and family  members carrying photos searched for their loved ones,” Kremin added. “We saw New  Yorkers praying and building impromptu memorials of candles and  flowers around the walls of photographs. While we were in Rome we  participated in a candlelight vigil for the victims, walking with  thousands of other people through the city toward the ancient Roman Colosseum. We were in Italy four days before we finally got a flight back to  London where we spent two days waiting for a flight out of Heathrow.  We waited  with hundreds of other Americans at the airport. Some of  them were returning to friends and loved ones who had survived, others  were relatives of the dead. All of us were stranded by the same  tragedy. All of us wanted to go home.”
“I’ll never forget our pilot’s words as we neared home: ‘We have just entered U.S. air space. It’s good to be home ladies and  gentlemen, and may God bless the United States of America’. I will  never forget that.”
Mandy Knechtly, whose fiance, Danny, was a U. S. Marine waiting to be deployed, remembers: “As I watched the tragedy unfold on TV that day, my heart ached for the loss our country was enduring, and I  feared what it meant for Danny and me. We knew he would be called up,  it was just a matter of time. That call came on the 7th of March. We married two days later, and on  the 11th he was gone.  Two years later I watched as President Bush declared war on Iraq and US troops began the march toward Baghdad. At that time Danny was still in Kuwait. I hated watching the news,  but at the same time I couldn’t look away or stop worrying and  wondering where he was, if he were safe, and when he would call.”
September 11  meant a lot of different things for different people, Knechtly continued. “ Some still suffer the loss of loved ones from that day, and some are still suffering loss as we fight an endless war on terrorism all over  the world. Personally, I was able to forge bonds with other military  wives and families that I will cherish the rest of my life. My husband  is the man and father he is today because of the impact the Marine  Corps and his brothers made in his life. I am so thankful he came home.”
Matt Young, currently the principal at North Adams High School, had another personal connection to the attacks on the Pentagon in the nation’s capital.
“I was teaching 6th grade at the time and terrified,” said Young. “Obviously because our country was just attacked and secondly because my brother Mark worked in the Pentagon at the time. We couldn’t make contact with him until the evening. Phone lines were a mess.”
This Sunday, September 11 as we remember our own stories, we  remember too the men and women and children who died on that fateful  day in the Twin Towers, in the Pentagon, on American Flights 77 and  11, and United Flights 175 and 93 which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania after passengers attempted to wrest control of the plane from the hijackers. We also remember and honor the sacrifice of  firefighters, policemen, and EMT personnel on that day, as well as the  thousands of brave military men and women who have fought and died in the war on terror that ensued after the 9/11 attack.

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