Missing Adams County man is found Lady Hounds fall to Whiteoak in slugfest Calvert’s walk-off gives Hounds 9-8 win over Whiteoak Charles A Benjamin Give My Regards to Broadway Joyce Berry Joe L Easter William E Foster Margaret Belcher John M Cheatham Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders There will be trouble in River City! Monna L Fitzgerald Jesse Carrington Janice M Sowards Rhoden family members make plea for tips in Pike Co murders of loved ones Quilting – the art that’s no longer just for Grandma Young is Adams County recipient of Franklin B. Walter All-Scholastic Award Wenstrup recognized as Community Health Advocate Ready, set, go! 25th annual Egg Hunt draws hundreds Applicants needed for Adams County Fair Queen Humane Society encourages responsible animal ownership ACCS holds annual Science Fair Peebles Elementary names March Students of the Month Pierce fires perfect game as Peebles blanks West Union Hunters preparing for 2017 Wild Turkey Season Lady Hounds fall 12-3 at Lynchburg Dragons lose early lead, drop SHAC match up with Fayetteville, 13-6 Senior Profile: Isaiah Anderson Devils roll to big SHAC win at Ripley Despite soggy night, WUHS hosts annual Invitational Meet Celebrities for a night George F Carr Jr Teresa S Hoskins Mary B McClure Richard B Collins Randall D Fetters Former Manchester officer indicted on five counts WUHS student wins state Beta Club Secretary’s seat OVCTC students part of state competition S.R. 73 closed for culvert replacement Peebles Lions Club holds first Easter Egg Hunt Weyrich graduates with honors from Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics North Adams Elementary releases Honor Roll for Third grading Period Scholarships available from Jefferson Alumni Olympic athlete speaks at April 6 SAAM event Venture Hawks end their basketball season with a victory at WUHS Devils baseball sweeps doubleheader from Northwest Greyhounds gain SHAC split, split twinbill with East England signs with Rio Grande golf Pierce fans 16, Lady Indians blank Eastern Brown 4-0 Maybe somebody on the river does have a plan Senior Profile: Ryan Dryden Enjoying the view Still a time for celebration Carl R Brown Lena R Staggs Adams County Crews Schedule Culvert Replacement Projects Merlan Shoemaker Dwayne E Thompson Help is on the line! West Union Elementary honors February Students of the Month WUHS hosts 2017 All-County Arts and Music Festival Ohio Brush Creek Canoe/Kayak Access Grand Opening set for April 20 Kasich cracks down on opiate-based prescriptions West Union High School students have successful trip to State Beta Convention North Adams Beta Club excels at State Convention ACRMC hosts annual Health Fair Robert H Bushman Senior Profile: Skylar Newman Nine-run inning leads Lady Hounds to run rule win over West Union WUHS foursome breaks school record First county baseball battle goes to the Greyhounds On the road, Lady Indians pick up two more SHAC victories Senior Profile: Christa Williams One more ‘shining moment’ for SHAC seniors at C103 All-Star Game Esie M Chandler Phyllis Adkins Former Manchester police deputy faces Grand Jury Indictments Cornell tosses no-hitter, Fenton goes deep, Dragons open season with 11-0 SHAC win over Whiteoak New Verizon store opening in West Union Stephen R Palmer Dual culvert replacements for SR 73 Deana P Grooms Tim Phipps Marcella Walker Alvin R Mitchum Senior Profile: Chase Darnell SHAC hoopsters shine at District 14 All-Star Game Greyhounds run rule St. Pat, 15-0 Indians drop SHAC opener West Union hosts early JH Track Meet North Adams student wins state Beta Club President’s seat Anna B Copas Charles A Nelson Nation’s #1 movie comes to stage Artectis hosts grand opening

Remembering 9/11-15 years later

Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.
Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.

Where were you? Readers share their stories –

By Patricia Beech –

Where were you?
Were you at work?  Were you in school? Were you at the grocery or visiting a friend?
Chances are you remember with great clarity exactly where you  were on that cloudless September morning fifteen years ago when the unthinkable happened.
America was attacked.
In a deliberate act of war conducted with chilling precision,  terrorists turned four passenger airliners into  deadly bombs and delivered  death to more than innocent 3,000 Americans.
The brazen and devastating attack left us all stunned and shaken,  struggling to grasp the full scope of the catastrophe. Through that  long day we watched, shattered and paralyzed, as the world we knew  gave way to unspeakable, unimaginable violence and pain.
We all remember that September morning. It is burned indelibly  into the memories of all Americans.
“I was in the eighth grade, sitting in History class, staring at the TV in disbelief and with an overwhelming sense that life as we  knew it was about to change forever,” Lindsay Cline, Public Safety  Communications Manager at UC Health remembers.  “I watched all those  firefighters, EMTs, and police officers rushing in while everyone else  was running out. From that moment I knew I wanted to be in public service. I’m now celebrating my tenth year in EMS.”
“I grew up in Adams County, but I lived in Newport on 9/11. I  remember seeing the TV and thinking it was a movie. When I realized it  wasn’t I grew very scared,” Patty Ryan-Fox, a Team Health employee in  Knoxville TN recalled. “The first thing I thought of was what if they  crashed a plane into the Oak Ridge nuclear plant. I remember calling my  sister , who still lives in Adams county. We were both scared. It was  the first time it crossed my mind that my family was strung out between Ohio and Tennessee. I thought I may never see them again.”
Carisa Kremin, on a business trip for the Honda Corporation when  the towers were hit, remembers: “I was flying from London to Turin, Italy. When we landed airport security met us on the tarmac and asked  if there were any Americans on board. We said we were and they hurried us off the plane and into the airport where Italian soldiers told us  what was happening in the U.S.  We were taken to an American hotel in  Rome.”
“That night CNN was our only connection to home,” Kremin continued. “The news anchors were Italian, so we couldn’t understand them, but we began to piece  the story together.  We watched in horror as they replayed the  attacks. We saw the first plane hit and the people on the street looking up in disbelief and confusion. We saw the second plane hit and we knew it was no accident. We watched the smoke billowing from the scars in the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. Then the towers started to  fall and we saw the people closest to Ground Zero running, terrified,  their faces covered in white dust.”
“We tried to call home, but couldn’t get through. There were no cell phones and all of the land lines into the U.S. were tied up.  There were no flights. All air traffic in and out of the U.S. was  grounded.”
“Even though the Italian people were kind, and sad for us, it was  scary to be outside the country so far from home.”
“We watched as the number of casualties kept rising and family  members carrying photos searched for their loved ones,” Kremin added. “We saw New  Yorkers praying and building impromptu memorials of candles and  flowers around the walls of photographs. While we were in Rome we  participated in a candlelight vigil for the victims, walking with  thousands of other people through the city toward the ancient Roman Colosseum. We were in Italy four days before we finally got a flight back to  London where we spent two days waiting for a flight out of Heathrow.  We waited  with hundreds of other Americans at the airport. Some of  them were returning to friends and loved ones who had survived, others  were relatives of the dead. All of us were stranded by the same  tragedy. All of us wanted to go home.”
“I’ll never forget our pilot’s words as we neared home: ‘We have just entered U.S. air space. It’s good to be home ladies and  gentlemen, and may God bless the United States of America’. I will  never forget that.”
Mandy Knechtly, whose fiance, Danny, was a U. S. Marine waiting to be deployed, remembers: “As I watched the tragedy unfold on TV that day, my heart ached for the loss our country was enduring, and I  feared what it meant for Danny and me. We knew he would be called up,  it was just a matter of time. That call came on the 7th of March. We married two days later, and on  the 11th he was gone.  Two years later I watched as President Bush declared war on Iraq and US troops began the march toward Baghdad. At that time Danny was still in Kuwait. I hated watching the news,  but at the same time I couldn’t look away or stop worrying and  wondering where he was, if he were safe, and when he would call.”
September 11  meant a lot of different things for different people, Knechtly continued. “ Some still suffer the loss of loved ones from that day, and some are still suffering loss as we fight an endless war on terrorism all over  the world. Personally, I was able to forge bonds with other military  wives and families that I will cherish the rest of my life. My husband  is the man and father he is today because of the impact the Marine  Corps and his brothers made in his life. I am so thankful he came home.”
Matt Young, currently the principal at North Adams High School, had another personal connection to the attacks on the Pentagon in the nation’s capital.
“I was teaching 6th grade at the time and terrified,” said Young. “Obviously because our country was just attacked and secondly because my brother Mark worked in the Pentagon at the time. We couldn’t make contact with him until the evening. Phone lines were a mess.”
This Sunday, September 11 as we remember our own stories, we  remember too the men and women and children who died on that fateful  day in the Twin Towers, in the Pentagon, on American Flights 77 and  11, and United Flights 175 and 93 which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania after passengers attempted to wrest control of the plane from the hijackers. We also remember and honor the sacrifice of  firefighters, policemen, and EMT personnel on that day, as well as the  thousands of brave military men and women who have fought and died in the war on terror that ensued after the 9/11 attack.

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