Robert D Hill Lady Devils blank West Union 7-0 in SHAC soccer finale Vikings invade and conquer the Greyhounds Outpouring of community support for local business woman with cancer Manchester mourns teen killed in single-car crash Kylie S Lucas Sharon R Grooms Steven L Wootten Forest J McDaniel Ralph O Grooms Adams County teenager dies in auto accident Charles N Vance Wesley M Baldwin James Kennedy Tom A Mihalovich Brand hat trick leads North Adams past West Union 5-2 in SHAC soccer action Senior Profile: Bryant Lung Lady Hounds pull off thrilling Senior Night win Volleyball milestones continue to pile up at North Adams Banner season for Lady Indians soccer SHAC holds Junior High Volleyball Tournament Tournament match ups set for volleyball and soccer Senior Profile: Morgan Edmisten Hounds dominate, improve to 3-4 Is this not the best time of the year? Volley For The Cure is another big success Getting everything we ask for Oh, that dreaded leaf project Manchester: Adams County’s oldest community looks to the future with hope Congressman visits Manchester’s newest business Six candidates vie for MLSD School Board Highway 41 road work stalls MFD holds annual Safety Day for kids, families Lenora Mckee Virgie Cole Helen J Damron Karen S Lockhart Donna M Pelfrey Russell D Pollitt, Sr Karen S Lockhart Harris named Director of Shelter for the Homeless Local candidates abundant on November ballot Senior Profile: McKinlee Grooms Lady Dragons finish third in district golf tourney Lady Devils challenged, but survive to extend SHAC streak to 60 Rally falls short, Lady Hounds fall in five sets to Fairfield Senior Profile: Jessica Newman Lady Indians get shutout win over West Union, 2-0 Erwins host annual Herb Fair Bentonville: A community at the crossroads of Adams County history Tranquility, Wilson Homestead host annual Heritage Days Why we get back up Your local newspaper, the real deal Welcome to the morning klatch Oleda F Saunders Frank A Golden Shirley A Tully Hubert Knauff John T Shupert Celebrate the sports pages Gould, Woolard, defense lead Hounds to second win George E Lucas Betty A Johnson Hayes sentenced Sue Day Devils headed back to state golf tourney Earl R Fields Alberta L Steward Gregory Terry Linda Taylor Levies slated for November ballot Manchester residents forming neighborhood watch group West Union teachers receive prestigious award Crum arraigned in Brown County Common Pleas Court Seaman: A small town with a big heart and a family spirit Seaman Fall Festival again draws large crowds NAES participates in weekend food program AES Ohio Generation assumes control of DP&L assets West Union, Peebles take home county XC crowns Lady Devils win a soccer buzzer-beater Senior Profile: Brooklyn Wylie Lady Dragons move to districts Green Devils win sectional golf title West Union hosting fourth annual Alumni Volleyball Game Gray breaks Lady Indians’ single season goals record Senior Profile: Chase Cummings Lady Dragons cruise to SHAC title Hupp ties school record with five goals in Lady Devils’ win over Southeastern For 14th time in 15 years, Dragons claim SHAC Boys Golf Championship Getting life in order See those signals of the season Jury returns verdict in former Manchester police officer’s trial Larry Peters Gary L Hughes Sr Deanna L Parker Stephen R Fetters Bonnie Hawkins Clifton J DeMint Steven L Kimberlin When you just know

Remembering 9/11-15 years later

Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.
Peebles resident Carisa Kremin was traveling in Europe at the time of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and was part of this candlelight vigil held in Rome, Italy.

Where were you? Readers share their stories –

By Patricia Beech –

Where were you?
Were you at work?  Were you in school? Were you at the grocery or visiting a friend?
Chances are you remember with great clarity exactly where you  were on that cloudless September morning fifteen years ago when the unthinkable happened.
America was attacked.
In a deliberate act of war conducted with chilling precision,  terrorists turned four passenger airliners into  deadly bombs and delivered  death to more than innocent 3,000 Americans.
The brazen and devastating attack left us all stunned and shaken,  struggling to grasp the full scope of the catastrophe. Through that  long day we watched, shattered and paralyzed, as the world we knew  gave way to unspeakable, unimaginable violence and pain.
We all remember that September morning. It is burned indelibly  into the memories of all Americans.
“I was in the eighth grade, sitting in History class, staring at the TV in disbelief and with an overwhelming sense that life as we  knew it was about to change forever,” Lindsay Cline, Public Safety  Communications Manager at UC Health remembers.  “I watched all those  firefighters, EMTs, and police officers rushing in while everyone else  was running out. From that moment I knew I wanted to be in public service. I’m now celebrating my tenth year in EMS.”
“I grew up in Adams County, but I lived in Newport on 9/11. I  remember seeing the TV and thinking it was a movie. When I realized it  wasn’t I grew very scared,” Patty Ryan-Fox, a Team Health employee in  Knoxville TN recalled. “The first thing I thought of was what if they  crashed a plane into the Oak Ridge nuclear plant. I remember calling my  sister , who still lives in Adams county. We were both scared. It was  the first time it crossed my mind that my family was strung out between Ohio and Tennessee. I thought I may never see them again.”
Carisa Kremin, on a business trip for the Honda Corporation when  the towers were hit, remembers: “I was flying from London to Turin, Italy. When we landed airport security met us on the tarmac and asked  if there were any Americans on board. We said we were and they hurried us off the plane and into the airport where Italian soldiers told us  what was happening in the U.S.  We were taken to an American hotel in  Rome.”
“That night CNN was our only connection to home,” Kremin continued. “The news anchors were Italian, so we couldn’t understand them, but we began to piece  the story together.  We watched in horror as they replayed the  attacks. We saw the first plane hit and the people on the street looking up in disbelief and confusion. We saw the second plane hit and we knew it was no accident. We watched the smoke billowing from the scars in the Twin Towers and the Pentagon. Then the towers started to  fall and we saw the people closest to Ground Zero running, terrified,  their faces covered in white dust.”
“We tried to call home, but couldn’t get through. There were no cell phones and all of the land lines into the U.S. were tied up.  There were no flights. All air traffic in and out of the U.S. was  grounded.”
“Even though the Italian people were kind, and sad for us, it was  scary to be outside the country so far from home.”
“We watched as the number of casualties kept rising and family  members carrying photos searched for their loved ones,” Kremin added. “We saw New  Yorkers praying and building impromptu memorials of candles and  flowers around the walls of photographs. While we were in Rome we  participated in a candlelight vigil for the victims, walking with  thousands of other people through the city toward the ancient Roman Colosseum. We were in Italy four days before we finally got a flight back to  London where we spent two days waiting for a flight out of Heathrow.  We waited  with hundreds of other Americans at the airport. Some of  them were returning to friends and loved ones who had survived, others  were relatives of the dead. All of us were stranded by the same  tragedy. All of us wanted to go home.”
“I’ll never forget our pilot’s words as we neared home: ‘We have just entered U.S. air space. It’s good to be home ladies and  gentlemen, and may God bless the United States of America’. I will  never forget that.”
Mandy Knechtly, whose fiance, Danny, was a U. S. Marine waiting to be deployed, remembers: “As I watched the tragedy unfold on TV that day, my heart ached for the loss our country was enduring, and I  feared what it meant for Danny and me. We knew he would be called up,  it was just a matter of time. That call came on the 7th of March. We married two days later, and on  the 11th he was gone.  Two years later I watched as President Bush declared war on Iraq and US troops began the march toward Baghdad. At that time Danny was still in Kuwait. I hated watching the news,  but at the same time I couldn’t look away or stop worrying and  wondering where he was, if he were safe, and when he would call.”
September 11  meant a lot of different things for different people, Knechtly continued. “ Some still suffer the loss of loved ones from that day, and some are still suffering loss as we fight an endless war on terrorism all over  the world. Personally, I was able to forge bonds with other military  wives and families that I will cherish the rest of my life. My husband  is the man and father he is today because of the impact the Marine  Corps and his brothers made in his life. I am so thankful he came home.”
Matt Young, currently the principal at North Adams High School, had another personal connection to the attacks on the Pentagon in the nation’s capital.
“I was teaching 6th grade at the time and terrified,” said Young. “Obviously because our country was just attacked and secondly because my brother Mark worked in the Pentagon at the time. We couldn’t make contact with him until the evening. Phone lines were a mess.”
This Sunday, September 11 as we remember our own stories, we  remember too the men and women and children who died on that fateful  day in the Twin Towers, in the Pentagon, on American Flights 77 and  11, and United Flights 175 and 93 which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania after passengers attempted to wrest control of the plane from the hijackers. We also remember and honor the sacrifice of  firefighters, policemen, and EMT personnel on that day, as well as the  thousands of brave military men and women who have fought and died in the war on terror that ensued after the 9/11 attack.

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