One thing to remember this President’s Day Adams County Deer Harvest down over 21% MLSD amends five-year budget, prepares for future with power plant closings Lady Dragons triumph in sectional opener Lady Hounds eighth graders capture SHAC Tournament title Gary L Fetters Sr Boys Sectional brackets released ‘We’re only as good as the way we treat others’ Another round of smiles Adams County Board of DD members recognized Terry L Unger 8th Grade Lady Devils ousted in tourney semis WU’s McCarty signs with Ohio Christian Joyce A Huddleson Carolyn Spires BREAKING NEWS: Peebles police search for man accused of selling marijuana-laced sweets Decision Time BBN Senior Profile: Summer Grundy Lady Devils fall to Southeastern, 56-48 Devils outlast Manchester 47-44 in double overtime Peebles holds second Hall of Fame Ceremony Senior Profile: Patrick England Sowards hits 1,000, ties PHS three-point mark County agencies prepare for sweeping budget cuts Manchester Council votes to cut police chief’s hours Wrestling debuts in Adams County Peebles Library hosts book signing As plants power down, community must step up Raymond P Dryden Alva Palmer Billie L Shoemaker Judith Long Brent A Arn Girls basketball sectional pairings announced WU’s Weeks will continue gridiron career at next level West Union JH Boys drop pair at Ripley Eighth Grade Lady Hounds roll into SHAC semi-finals Janet A Kennedy DP&L moving ahead with plans to close power plants Outreach Center in Peebles is a hub of giving River Sweep contest winners announced Gordley hits 1,000 mark, but Indians drop crucial SHAC contest to Lynchburg Manchester lifters compete at Piketon Senior Profile: Madelyn Sanders Charles L Hurd Randy Casto Bobby Strunk Dorothy J Scott Chester A Lanter Coach David Smalley picks up 500th career win at Rio Grande Dustin Holbrook Senior Profile: Camron Gordley As usual, optimism abounds on 2017 Reds Caravan Breeze, Beasley newest members of NAHS Athletic HOF Two humble men Adams County Manor Home Health Care makes road to recovery easier Don and Venita Bowles named as Outstanding Fair Supporters ‘Tip off For Tammy’ is a huge success, joint effort by two schools Husted campaign makes stop in Peebles Benefit held for double-lung transplant recipient I loved that muddy water, building in the creek Margaret E Broughton Larry A Hanson DP&L press release confirms closing of power plants Eighth grade girls showdown lives up to hype, North Adams wins in overtime, 45-43 Senior Profile: Raeanna Stamm North Adams Football sign-ups coming soon North Adams JV girls go 11-4 with win over Peebles Harper wins MaxPreps/JJHuddle Athlete of the Week West Union duo headed to the college gridiron Lady Devils make it 11 straight with win at Peebles Adams County residents attend Trump Inauguration A Look back at our Archives Peebles native comes home to film documentary Ohio Valley Wrestling Cub hosting home match on Jan. 31 Ruth A Branscome Velma Hughes Carol L Lewis Betty L Greiner Devils top New Boston 63-53 in finale of Coach Young Classic Lady Devils rout Eastern Pike in Young Classic Indians bounce back with 67-59 win over East OHSAA Baseball Pitch Count Regulation approved for 2017 At the buzzer, Rothwell gives Dragons an overtime win Greyhounds fall to Portsmouth Lady Indians roll past West Union 80-29 From Division II to the Senior Bowl COSI On Wheels visits West Union Elementary News from the Peebles PTO NAJH Basketball hosting ‘Play For The Cure’ Jan. 28 North Adams Elementary recognizes Students and Staff Members of the Month for December Honoring a coaching legend Benefit will assist double-lung transplant patient Peebles to be featured in new documentary Cleaning the stables-the worst job on the farm Wenstrup reselected to serve on House Intelligence Committee Venture Hawks and Sheriff’s Department square off on Feb. 12 Cecil R Dupree Harper wins MaxPreps/JJHuddle Athlete of the Week Star Wars costume exhibition coming to Museum Center

Observing over four decades of family tradition and community service

Paula Aulino and daughter Lily Kate are seen here among the many furniture offerings at Chamblin Furniture in West Union.
Paula Aulino and daughter Lily Kate are seen here among the many furniture offerings at Chamblin Furniture in West Union.

Chamblin to hold anniversary, memorial sale –

Story by Patricia Beech –
Photo by Mark Carpenter –
For more than four decades Paul Wayne Chamblin and his wife Joyce  served the people of Adams County selling home furnishings out of their  long rambling furniture store on the corner of Rice Drive in West Union.
Next week their daughter, Paula Aulino, will celebrate their store’s 44th year of business with a special anniversary sale to honor her parents’ memo
She calls her return to her parent’s store “bittersweet”.
“It’s good to be back in the furniture store,” she says. “Being here  brings back happy memories, but it also really makes me miss my Mom  and Dad. My parents loved this county, they loved their business and  being able to serve people through their business.”
Aulino, who spent several years working in the corporate world  before starting her own interior design business in Columbus, says  returning to her parent’s store has given her the opportunity to  reconnect with people from her childhood.
“There are such good people here, and it’s comforting knowing people  who knew your parents, it’s a wonderful connection.”
Returning to oversee her parent’s store, while continuing to run her  own business is a daunting enterprise, but she is driven by a greater  purpose.
“I’m trying to carry on the tradition my parents started in 1972,” she  says. “ As Dad would say, ‘to serve the fine people of Adams and  surrounding counties’.” Aulino isn’t just mimicking her father’s  favorite expression, she has a deep appreciation for her parent’s  legacy of reaching out to help people through their business.
“They truly loved what they did, and they saw the business as an  opportunity to reach out and help people,” she says. “Quality and  value were always their goal in business and it always made them happy  when someone would say, we bought a sofa or chair from you 25 years  ago, it’s still good, but we’re ready for something new.”
Aulino spent her growing up years working with her parents in the  family business.
“My childhood was unique because I went to work with my parents  every day after school – not many kids get to do that,” she says. “I’d  sit in a rocking chair by the front door and when someone pulled up  I’d run back and tell Mom there was a customer, and she’d ask me, ‘Is  it a looker or a buyer’ because I had a knack for telling them apart.”
While Aulino has a wealth of happy memories from those years, she and  her family also faced dark times and challenges that drew them closer  together and forged an inner strength that would sustain them through  many difficult years.
During her Sophomore year at Ohio State her father was diagnosed with  cancer. He began a battle with the disease that would last more than three decades before it took his life.
“Dad never said, ‘Why me?’, throughout his illnesses. I think he felt  like, ‘Why not me?’ I never saw him get down about his illnesses, he  always said, ‘you know, it’s just the way it is’, and he chose to see  it as an opportunity to help others.”
Chamblin’s battles with cancer were well known in the community, and  others who were similarly stricken would visit his store to talk about  their own struggles. Among them was the daughter of one of his  competitors, Judy Mosier Campbell.
“Wayne and I were experiencing bouts with cancer at nearly the same  time almost 30 years ago,” Campbell says. “We forged a special  relationship of mentoring and support for each other. Mine was fortunately a one time occurrence, but Wayne fought battle after  battle with such courage and faith that he was an inspiration to me  and so many others.”
Fourteen years ago, in the midst of her father’s ongoing struggle with  illness, Aulino’s mother was also diagnosed with a very rare form of  breast cancer. Within 30 days her liver was completely consumed and within two months it ended her life.
Aulino, who had taken a leave of absence from her job during her  mother’s illness, returned to work, then two months later, walked away  from the corporate world.
“When she died, I thought life’s just too short, work was always so  stressful, people were always gunning for your job, so I left and  decided to focus on my own business.”
Her decision to step out on her own brought a new opportunity to work  with her father.
“It was nice for Dad and I to work together again,” she said. “He’d  come to Columbus and work with me, hang pictures, and give advice, we  had fun doing it, it gave him something to do, and that’s how we’ve  been for the past 14 years.”
In 2015, in his 83rd year, her father’s cancer returned. The prognosis  was dire. “I was so sad,” Aulino says. “But, Dad said ‘kid, you’ve had  me 25 years longer than you should have, let’s just count our  blessings’, he really felt God put this in his life for a reason.”
Before her father’s passing she was to receive one more blessing from  him that would sustain her during the months following his death.
“I’d given Dad a little book for Christmas that consisted of questions  you could ask your father like what was your first job, what’s the  best advice you ever got, who was your best friend when you were  young. We spent three weeks going through that book, and it was one of  the best gifts I could have ever received from my dad. As a child,  your parents are just your parents, but because of that book I got to  know him more as an individual – his struggles, his joys, his dreams,  and the funny things that happened when he was young.”
In Feb. 2016, Chamblin’s battle with cancer came to its end. “Dad died early on a Sunday morning and he had a positive attitude  right up to the end. You tell yourself it’s the natural order, but I  can’t tell you how many times during a day I want to ask him  something, or tell him something. I miss him so much.”
She calls her father “the hippest old man I’ve ever known.” “He taught me to be thankful for everything, to see blessings  everywhere. He loved God, he loved people, he loved music, he was  vital and vibrant, he was just a wonder.”
As she prepares for the store’s anniversary sale, Aulino finds herself  coping with the double-edged emotions of grief.
“It’s a wonderful thing to be here, and it’s a hard thing to be here,”  she says. “I feel Dad’s spirit is still with us, and I want to honor  him by running this sale in a way that would make him proud.”
The anniversary sale begins Saturday, July 30  with extended hours  every other day (9 a.m.-6 p.m.), open Sunday 1-5 p.m., and the week-long  event will end Saturday, Aug. 6.

2 comments:

  1. What a lovely story! I could so hear Wayne making some of the comments Paula mentioned. He always ended his goodbye with God Bless You! Happy Anniversary to Chamblin Furniture.

  2. I purchased several nice pieces for my family from Wayne and Joyce; but, what impressed me the most was how they worked with me to help families in need with basic furniture needs while allowing them to maintain their dignity.

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