Facebook – a growing marketplace for local entrepreneurs When kids know best Giving some love to those dog days Junior Fair BBQ again a big success Beulah B James Senior Profile: Josie Myers Lady Indians place second at Ohio Classic in Hillsboro MVCA dominates Greyhounds in 45-0 triumph For Lady Devils, SHAC streak goes to 55 matches 9/11: Sixteen years later Gertrude Gibson Defender Bowl coming Sept. 16 Joyce A Walker Virginia R Young Senior Profile: Abby Campton West Union hosts 2017 Dragon Run New gridiron history begins for Peebles Trout, fire, and blueberry fields forever Senior Profile: Baylee Justice Lady Devils win SHAC thriller at Eastern Brown From Blue Creek to the Beaneaters Tough loss for Greyhounds in season opener Turning tragedy into hope What we learn from failure Absolutely had to get the wrinkles out Frances S Kidder Leo Trotter 41st Bentonville Festival set to begin Sept. 8 Winchester celebrates its history during three-day street fair Cruisefest returning to streets of Peebles Blue Creek- a community in transition honors its history and heritage Cuteness Galore – Winchester Homecoming Festival Baby Show Ronnie L Day Cast your vote for the Adams County Fairgrounds Nelson E Atkinson Ryan L Colvin Richard Tackett William L Tadlock Penny Pollard Wendell Beasley West Union soccer drops pair at Mason County Lady Indians go down in straight sets Senior Profile: Michael Gill Senior Profile: Katie Sandlin Royals dominate in big win over North Adams Dragons continue County Cup domination Archaeology Day returns to Serpent Mound Hourglass Quilt Square is back up again Manchester family hosts International Guests History, farming, and family- the bedrock of Cherry Fork’s community Bus drivers, emergency responders prepare for coming school year Working up a real good sweat What’s behind the motive? Rondal R Bailey Jr Thelma J Yates She’s all grown up now Scott A Yeager Soccer talent on display at 2017 SHAC preview Baseball community mourns the loss of Gene Bennett Winchester Homecoming Festival is Aug 25-27 Eleanor P Tumbleson Felicity man killed in Ohio River boating accident WUHS golfers take Portsmouth Invitational It was pretty cold that day Volleyball kicks off with SHAC Preview Night Young awarded Women’s Western Golf Foundation Scholarship One Mistake Senator Portman visits GE Test Facility in Peebles Adams County school districts facing some major challenges for the coming year Family, friends, and roots: the ties that bind residents of one Adams County village What is your strength? Just the chance to take a look back Ronnie L Wolford Dale J Marshall Herbert Purvis Great American Solar Eclipse coming Aug. 21 BREAKING NEWS: West Union wins fifth consecutive County Cup Wallace B Boden John L Fletcher Lady Indians golfers learning the links North Adams, West Union golfers open 2017 seasons This Labor Day, ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Blanton announces candicacy for Court of Appeals Local student attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders MHS welcomes new principal Made in America When it feels like you’re spinning plates Bonfires and “building” a farm Lady Devils looking to take that next step 50 years of Bengal memories Ag Society delivers donation to Dragonfly Foundation Young Memorial Scholarship awarded to a pair of local seniors ‘Musical passion is in his blood’ Naylor named NAHS Principal Boldman retiring after 17 years as Homeless Shelter director Manchester concludes another River Days celebration Drug Treatment vs. Prison James R Brown Bobby Lawler Jr Adams County man charged with killing estranged girlfriend

“I had so much fun”

These Adams County youth participated last week in the Summer Arts Camp, sponsored annually by the Adams County Arts Council.
These Adams County youth participated last week in the Summer Arts Camp, sponsored annually by the Adams County Arts Council.

Summer Arts Camp lets kids shine –

Story and photos by Patricia Beech –

“I had so much fun.”
Emma Napier’s eyes light up when she talks about her week-long  experience at Summer Arts Camp.  “I’ve been coming here since it  started,” she says. “And I like acting best, because I’m not very good  at drawing.”

Her younger sister, Jayce shares Emma’s enthusiasm, “I just love it,”  she says. Both girls say they plan to return next year.

That’s exactly the reaction members of the Adams County Arts Council  hope to hear.
“It’s wonderful to see the kids get excited about creativity,” says  Elaine Lafferty, the camp’s director. “We’re in our fourth year, and  we have many students who return year after year.”

Launched in 2012 by local artist J.R. Bradley, the Summer Arts Camp  provides arts education at no cost to young people, ages 9 – 14,  across Adams County.
This year 28 campers spent a week exploring and developing their  creativity through the arts. Each day, they participated in activities  designed to nurture their talents, and as they learned arts skills,  they also developed life skills: confidence, self-expression, and  creativity.

Some programs focused on visual arts, some on performing arts,but all  shared the common goal of helping kids grow.

Each camper chose one of five creative venues to participate in for  the entire week: Drawing, taught by author and illustrator, Adam  Watkins; Water Color Painting taught by award-winning artist JoAnn  White; Sculpture taught by Mike Roberts; Music and Theater taught by  West Union High School chorus teacher, Neil DeAtley.

“We have so many talented people in this county, and it’s wonderful  they’re willing to give their time to these children,” said Lafferty,  who taught Art Appreciation at the end of each day’s session. Focusing  on artists who worked in fields corresponding to those being studied  by the campers, Lafferty gave presentations on watercolor artist, P.  Buckley Moss, composer John Williams, illustrator C.F. Payne, and  sculptor and architect Maya Lin (designer of the Vietnam Wall Memorial).

Family and friends attended the camp’s “Show and Tell” exhibition on Friday, July 22, showcasing the campers’ artwork as well as a play and  musical performances by the music and theater participants.

Kathleen Young, whose daughter Aylee attended the camp, thought the  week was a very positive experience. “I think this camp is very important,” she said. “We need art and  music camp for kids who are gifted in those areas.”

These youngsters work on their drama skit, preparing for their performance for the public on Friday of Summer Arts Camp.
These youngsters work on their drama skit, preparing for their performance for the public on Friday of Summer Arts Camp.

Local attorney Roy Gabbert agreed. “My daughter is 12 years old, and I  want her to have something interesting and productive to do during the  summer, and the art camp provides that for her,” said Gebbert. “It’s a wonderful thing  the Arts Council provides, it makes me feel very good about our  community and very pleased the opportunity is available. It’s quite an endeavor and they’ve pulled it off successfully.”

Art Council members, Betsy Miskell, Sally White, and Paulette  Roberts provided food and refreshments for the campers throughout the  week. Miskall, who retired from the Cincinnati Public Library before  moving to Adams County, believes art is an essential element in  childhood education. “This summer camp is so important because from an  early age children need to be exposed to art and participate in it,”  she said. “It helps round out their education – sports, knowledge and  the arts all intertwine.”

Many studies have shown that arts education creates a bridge between  learning in school and putting what is learned to use in the real world. According to James Catterall, a retired UCLA education professor, “Art  is a way of thinking, it encourages asking questions, it encourages  taking some risks, and it encourages collaborative work.”

Students at schools with dynamic art programs consistently perform  better in nearly every area. According to a report from the  President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, schools with  strong art programs have higher attendance rates, higher morale, and  higher test scores than schools with weaker art programs.

Additionally, statistics show that low-income students attending  arts-rich schools are twice as likely to attend four-year colleges or  universities, compared with low-income students at schools without  much art. They were three times more likely to earn a bachelor’s  degree, and were less likely to drop out. They were also more involved  in sports, clubs, and volunteer work.

“Almost all kids start out liking art, they like coloring and  scribbling,” said the camp’s drawing instructor, Adam Watkins.  “But at  some point, when they start to feel they’re not good, they’ll quit,  but I think it’s important to know that it’s not about being good,  it’s about self expression. It’s about having an outlet where you can  be creative, and no one needs to see it. It’s healthy.”

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