Robert D Hill Lady Devils blank West Union 7-0 in SHAC soccer finale Vikings invade and conquer the Greyhounds Outpouring of community support for local business woman with cancer Manchester mourns teen killed in single-car crash Kylie S Lucas Sharon R Grooms Steven L Wootten Forest J McDaniel Ralph O Grooms Adams County teenager dies in auto accident Charles N Vance Wesley M Baldwin James Kennedy Tom A Mihalovich Brand hat trick leads North Adams past West Union 5-2 in SHAC soccer action Senior Profile: Bryant Lung Lady Hounds pull off thrilling Senior Night win Volleyball milestones continue to pile up at North Adams Banner season for Lady Indians soccer SHAC holds Junior High Volleyball Tournament Tournament match ups set for volleyball and soccer Senior Profile: Morgan Edmisten Hounds dominate, improve to 3-4 Is this not the best time of the year? Volley For The Cure is another big success Getting everything we ask for Oh, that dreaded leaf project Manchester: Adams County’s oldest community looks to the future with hope Congressman visits Manchester’s newest business Six candidates vie for MLSD School Board Highway 41 road work stalls MFD holds annual Safety Day for kids, families Lenora Mckee Virgie Cole Helen J Damron Karen S Lockhart Donna M Pelfrey Russell D Pollitt, Sr Karen S Lockhart Harris named Director of Shelter for the Homeless Local candidates abundant on November ballot Senior Profile: McKinlee Grooms Lady Dragons finish third in district golf tourney Lady Devils challenged, but survive to extend SHAC streak to 60 Rally falls short, Lady Hounds fall in five sets to Fairfield Senior Profile: Jessica Newman Lady Indians get shutout win over West Union, 2-0 Erwins host annual Herb Fair Bentonville: A community at the crossroads of Adams County history Tranquility, Wilson Homestead host annual Heritage Days Why we get back up Your local newspaper, the real deal Welcome to the morning klatch Oleda F Saunders Frank A Golden Shirley A Tully Hubert Knauff John T Shupert Celebrate the sports pages Gould, Woolard, defense lead Hounds to second win George E Lucas Betty A Johnson Hayes sentenced Sue Day Devils headed back to state golf tourney Earl R Fields Alberta L Steward Gregory Terry Linda Taylor Levies slated for November ballot Manchester residents forming neighborhood watch group West Union teachers receive prestigious award Crum arraigned in Brown County Common Pleas Court Seaman: A small town with a big heart and a family spirit Seaman Fall Festival again draws large crowds NAES participates in weekend food program AES Ohio Generation assumes control of DP&L assets West Union, Peebles take home county XC crowns Lady Devils win a soccer buzzer-beater Senior Profile: Brooklyn Wylie Lady Dragons move to districts Green Devils win sectional golf title West Union hosting fourth annual Alumni Volleyball Game Gray breaks Lady Indians’ single season goals record Senior Profile: Chase Cummings Lady Dragons cruise to SHAC title Hupp ties school record with five goals in Lady Devils’ win over Southeastern For 14th time in 15 years, Dragons claim SHAC Boys Golf Championship Getting life in order See those signals of the season Jury returns verdict in former Manchester police officer’s trial Larry Peters Gary L Hughes Sr Deanna L Parker Stephen R Fetters Bonnie Hawkins Clifton J DeMint Steven L Kimberlin When you just know

NASCAR to pay tribute to fallen Manchester soldier in Coca-Cola 600 this weekend

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Stenhouse car will honor James Woolard, killed in Vietnam

By Mark Carpenter –

One of Adams County’s finest will be honored in a very special and unique way this weekend as part of NASCAR’s second annual 600 Miles of Remembrance, part of the sport’s military appreciation platform, “NASCAR: An American Salute.” All 40 Spring Cup drivers in this weekend’s Coca-Cola 600 race will have special names placed on their car windshields to honor fallen service members. The No. 17 car driven by Ricky Stenhouse and owned by Jack Roush will be honoring SP James H. Woolard of Manchester, who was killed in action in Vietnam in 1969.

NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Daytona 500 - Qualifying“Charlotte always does a great job with remembering the veterans and military that gave the ultimate sacrifice for our country,” said Stenhouse. “I think our sponsor Fastenal does a great job with it as well and it’s something that its very important to them too, whether it be hiring the heroes or remembering the ones that gave everything.”

“This week we are going to have Jim Woolard on our car, who was one of Jack Roush’s childhood friends,” continued Stenhouse. “He grew up two doors down from Jack and died in the Vietnam War when he was only 20 years old. It will be a special weekend for us, especially with Jack being our owner. He will want to watch that car run really well and we’re going to give it everything we’ve got.”
James (Jim) Woolard was born on April 23, 1949, growing up like many other young men on the streets of Manchester. His parents ran the local newspaper, The Signal, and the Roushes and Woolards were family friends. Jimmy graduated from Manchester High School in 1967 and was inducted into the Unites States Army in February of 1969. He was shipped to Fort Knox, Ky. for eight weeks of basic training and then on to Fort Sill, Oklahoma where he was assigned to eight more weeks of training with an artillery unit.

SP James H. Woolard will be honored this weekend on the #17 car driven by Ricky Stenhouse.
SP James H. Woolard will be honored this weekend on the #17 car driven by Ricky Stenhouse.

After his graduation at Fort Sill, Woolard was able to come home on a much-deserved 30 day leave, where he renewed old acquaintances, spent time with his family and friends, fished in the Ohio River, and just enjoyed home, a place that he dearly loved. No one knew that this was to be his last visit.

Within four days after leaving Manchester to return to duty, Woolard was on a plane bound for Bien Hoa Airport in Vietnam. Five days after that, with a total of four months and five days of training time, he went on his first active patrol in Vietnam. He began his time as a member of A Battery, Sixth Battalion, 29th Artillery, Fourth Infantry Division, but soon was assigned to B Battery. h was part of a crew that constructed 12 army fire bases in Vietnam and after spending a few days at each of those sites, his unit would move on to another site.

His letters home revealed to his family and friends that by mid-November 1969, he had been transferred to somewhere in the vicinity of Pleiku in the Central Highland of Vietnam. The news that no family of a military member ever wants to get came to Manchester on Nov. 1, informing them that Jimmy had been hit in the left side of his neck by mortar fragments and been taken to the 71st Evacuation Hospital in Vietnam, where he passed away sometime on Nov. 3, 1969 at the age of 20.

The November 6, 1969 issues of The People’s Defender reported that “Mr. and Mrs. William G. Woolard were notified Tuesday morning that their son died in the 71st Evacuation Hospital without regaining consciousness after being hit on the left side of the next by mortar shrapnel.” The Defender also reported that family members were told that Woolard’s body was to arrive at the Greater Cincinnati Airport in seven to 10 days. He was laid to rest in the Manchester IOOF Cemetery and today, his name can be found among those on the Vietnam Wall in Washington DC, plot coordinates 16W 025.

This year’s Coca-Cola 600 will be broadcast live from the Charlotte Motor Speedway on FOX beginning at 6 p.m. on Sunday, may 29.

One comment:

  1. He took me to Portsmouth on the day I left for the Marines-he was taking his physical- we had some good laughs — a classmate of mine- was the last time I saw him- but did get a leave to attend his funeral

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