What we are made of When summer really arrived Horse project 4-H members head to Ohio State Fair Defender hosts annual Cornhole Tournament George’s Brave Shave’ benefits other Year of planning, work pays off for 2017 fair Local teen opens new business Why can’t you stop? Camp first step in preparation for 2018 Greyhounds on the gridiron Young awarded SEDAB Scholarship Fair hosts Hall of Fame broadcaster Peebles goes back-to-back at the Barnyard The sport of goats Massive storms rumble through Ohio Valley James W Morgan Tiffany R Edwards Marshall W Groves Fairgoers wanna iguana! SSCC moving forward with plans for Adams County campus Mary Wallingford Leslie V Lawrence Jr Fair hosts Cheerleading Competition Peebles FFA installs 2017-18 Officers Adams County Fair Baby Contest Seniors Citizens and Armed Forces Day at the fair Cheers! It’s mocktail time! North Adams Beta Club attends National Convention at Disney ‘You won’t believe the chaos it rains around you’ McCarty’s receive 4-H Alumni award McKayla Raines crowned 2017 Junior Fair Queen Eastern knocks off Peebles 10-5 to capture 14 U baseball tourney Just listen for the answer Time to teach a little History Fair hosts Little Miss and Mister, Toddler shows Jason E Palmer Dorothy Stephenson Shane G Varney The weekend I joined the Army David Stutz Patty Davis Battle results in new chief at the Division of Wildlife Join in with ‘Adams County Rocks’ After 500-mile journey, pigeon ‘drops’ in for a visit Nine-run third inning leads Peebles to upset win in SHYL 12U baseball tournament finals Willie L White David A Presley Connie Greene Carolyn Belczyk retiring from OSU Extension Young’s reign as Fair Queen ends, new journey begins Robert L Boone Esther C Malone Independence Day parade puts patriotism on display Being an addict’s mom: a sad and scary place to be White House newest addition to People’s Defender mailing list Young leaving Manchester to become Ripley Principal Leadoff homer holds up, Manchester takes 10U softball tourney 1-0 over North Adams North Adams tops Manchester in 12U semis Monday Night League concludes with SHAC showdown How we see ourselves In the good ole’ summertime Ronnie L Roush Elizabeth A Gifford Tom White Ivan H Copas Kathleen Lewis Paul Minton Jessica A Edmisten Workhouse helps free up jail space Penguin ‘chills’ with kids in library visit ‘Heroin has taken me to my darkest places’ The beauty of the giant combine West Union gets past North Adams 5-2 in 10U baseball tourney play Eastern Brown hosts annual Girls Soccer Shootout “It’s been a real community effort” Summer ball winds down for local squads Submit your Knothole team photos! Gokey, Morgan, Young to perform at 2017 Festival of the Bells Just looking around the room When in the course of human events When your dreams seem out of reach Ricky A Smith Ricky A Smith Dean McClellan Ruby O Shell Peggy R Atkinson Caroline E Fulton Marcia R Baldwin Juanita N Lewis Mary K Hilterbran Jack D Reed ‘I had no gumption except to get high’ Long-lost siblings meet for the first time after nearly six decades apart Freedom Festival to honor the American Flag ‘Music and Memory’ at Adams County Manor renews lives lost to dementia Adams County Sheriff’s Deputy takes gold at 2017 Ohio Police and Fire Games Toole awarded Winchester Alumni Scholarship Lady Devils host Summer Varsity Shootout In 14U, Peebles finishes regular season with blowout win Der professionelle Basketball-Traum Local pair attend Wabash College Wrestling Camp

Adams County hosts Capitol Day

By Patricia Beech

A group of Adams County residents were welcomed to the Ohio Statehouse on Thursday, April 14 by Attorney General Mike DeWine. The group traveled to Columbus to participate in ‘Adams County Day at the Capitol’. Mike Pell, President of First State Bank, commented, “This is a day to highlight the positive work we know is occurring in our communities and present it to those who can influence our continued growth.”

The Commissioner’s Office and the Leadership Adams organization partnered to create Capitol Day to provide a forum for conveying their message that “we are Adams County and we are open for business”.

The list of speakers for the day-long event included not only DeWine, but also Secretary of State John Husted, Lieutenant-Governor Mary Taylor, State Senator Joe Uecker, State Representative Terry Johnson, and ODNR Director Jim Zehringer.

Also present was Adams County native, and former State Senator Doug White who told the group, “Leadership is not complicated. The thing I learned growing up on a farm in Adams County is that you get a whole lot more hay in the barn by being out there working with the boys than you do sitting in the shade yelling at them. Same applies at the Statehouse, or in your business or agency.

Among the issues addressed were the heroin epidemic, the energy crisis, water quality, climate change, economic opportunities, and job growth.

Attorney General DeWine spoke about the heroin epidemic, telling those present: “It’s everywhere, every economic group, every social group, every race.” He said that his office believes that approximately three-quarters of all heroin addicts began as legal prescription users. “People get injured and become addicted to prescribed drugs, then later switch to heroin after their prescriptions runs out.” He added, “Heroin starts out as a $15-a-day habit, and builds to a $1500-a-day habit. Very few people have that kind of money, so they rip off their families and friends. We help local law enforcement fight the problem, but we’re not going to arrest our way out of this situation.”

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These members of the Leadership Adams Youth program met with State Senator Joe Uecker and State Representative Terry Johnson during Capitol Day. Pictured here are, from left, Josey Scott, Taylor Wylie, Senator Uecker, Tyker Ryan, Representative Johnson, Daisee Young, and Karlie Harper. Photo by Patricia Beech

DeWine recognized the multiple community programs that have arisen in Adams County in response to the drug epidemic, saying, “Communities are taking action because their children have died. Everyone needs to be involved – churches, businesses, and education need to be involved in this grassroots effort.”

There was also a panel discussion about the forces driving change in the energy market. Panel members included Kate Barter – Project Manager for the Appalachian Partnership for Economic Growth; Tom Raga – VP of External Affairs for DP&L; and Josh Knights, President of the Nature Conservancy.

Members of the Adams County coalition discussed several economic and social issues with Secretary of State John Husted, among them – the need for jobs.

Tad Mitchell, Career and Technical Supervisor for Ohio Valley School District, told the Secretary: “We happen to have a very skilled workforce in Adams County, unfortunately many of our students have to travel long distances to find high-paying jobs, or they choose to relocate, which is a brain-drain for the county, and that’s not what we want.”

Mitchell explained that those who choose to remain and work in Adams County are most often underemployed because there aren’t many high-paying jobs. “Coal is on it’s way out, and we have two coal-burning power plants that employ over 800 people in Adams County, they make up a large part of our tax base, and they have a life expectancy of only five to ten years. If they pull out and we have no other forms of jobs being created, it could leave our county even more devastated.”

Commissioner Paul Worley addressed the county’s energy issues, informing Husted of his office’s effort to bring natural gas into the area. “We’ve put together an informal group between GE, who has their test aviation site in Adams County, and DP&L which has two coal-fired power plants along the river,” said Worley. We’ve met with Duke Energy, we’ve met with Columbia Natural Gas, but unfortunately, we’re in an area without gas lines.”

Worley said that gas companies were interested in building in the county but without a major user, short of converting one of the power plants to natural gas, there was little hope they could recoup their investments. “There’s just not a lot of hope that they’ll invest over 50 million dollars to bring the pipeline in from Jackson, or from Mt. Orab. It’s a significant capital investment that they wouldn’t get back because we have a small population, but we’re keeping our options open, to be ready to capitalize on it when an opportunity does arise.”

The day’s events ended at the Governor’s Mansion where a new “Adams County Rock” was presented to the First Lady’s assistant, to be placed in the First Lady’s garden.

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