Giving some love to those dog days Junior Fair BBQ again a big success Beulah B James Senior Profile: Josie Myers Lady Indians place second at Ohio Classic in Hillsboro MVCA dominates Greyhounds in 45-0 triumph For Lady Devils, SHAC streak goes to 55 matches 9/11: Sixteen years later Gertrude Gibson Defender Bowl coming Sept. 16 Joyce A Walker Virginia R Young Senior Profile: Abby Campton West Union hosts 2017 Dragon Run New gridiron history begins for Peebles Trout, fire, and blueberry fields forever Senior Profile: Baylee Justice Lady Devils win SHAC thriller at Eastern Brown From Blue Creek to the Beaneaters Tough loss for Greyhounds in season opener Turning tragedy into hope What we learn from failure Absolutely had to get the wrinkles out Frances S Kidder Leo Trotter 41st Bentonville Festival set to begin Sept. 8 Winchester celebrates its history during three-day street fair Cruisefest returning to streets of Peebles Blue Creek- a community in transition honors its history and heritage Cuteness Galore – Winchester Homecoming Festival Baby Show Ronnie L Day Cast your vote for the Adams County Fairgrounds Nelson E Atkinson Ryan L Colvin Richard Tackett William L Tadlock Penny Pollard Wendell Beasley West Union soccer drops pair at Mason County Lady Indians go down in straight sets Senior Profile: Michael Gill Senior Profile: Katie Sandlin Royals dominate in big win over North Adams Dragons continue County Cup domination Archaeology Day returns to Serpent Mound Hourglass Quilt Square is back up again Manchester family hosts International Guests History, farming, and family- the bedrock of Cherry Fork’s community Bus drivers, emergency responders prepare for coming school year Working up a real good sweat What’s behind the motive? Rondal R Bailey Jr Thelma J Yates She’s all grown up now Scott A Yeager Soccer talent on display at 2017 SHAC preview Baseball community mourns the loss of Gene Bennett Winchester Homecoming Festival is Aug 25-27 Eleanor P Tumbleson Felicity man killed in Ohio River boating accident WUHS golfers take Portsmouth Invitational It was pretty cold that day Volleyball kicks off with SHAC Preview Night Young awarded Women’s Western Golf Foundation Scholarship One Mistake Senator Portman visits GE Test Facility in Peebles Adams County school districts facing some major challenges for the coming year Family, friends, and roots: the ties that bind residents of one Adams County village What is your strength? Just the chance to take a look back Ronnie L Wolford Dale J Marshall Herbert Purvis Great American Solar Eclipse coming Aug. 21 BREAKING NEWS: West Union wins fifth consecutive County Cup Wallace B Boden John L Fletcher Lady Indians golfers learning the links North Adams, West Union golfers open 2017 seasons This Labor Day, ‘Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over’ Blanton announces candicacy for Court of Appeals Local student attends Congress of Future Medical Leaders MHS welcomes new principal Made in America When it feels like you’re spinning plates Bonfires and “building” a farm Lady Devils looking to take that next step 50 years of Bengal memories Ag Society delivers donation to Dragonfly Foundation Young Memorial Scholarship awarded to a pair of local seniors ‘Musical passion is in his blood’ Naylor named NAHS Principal Boldman retiring after 17 years as Homeless Shelter director Manchester concludes another River Days celebration Drug Treatment vs. Prison James R Brown Bobby Lawler Jr Adams County man charged with killing estranged girlfriend Lexie N Hopkins Volleyball, soccer previews coming this weekend

Adams County hosts Capitol Day

By Patricia Beech

A group of Adams County residents were welcomed to the Ohio Statehouse on Thursday, April 14 by Attorney General Mike DeWine. The group traveled to Columbus to participate in ‘Adams County Day at the Capitol’. Mike Pell, President of First State Bank, commented, “This is a day to highlight the positive work we know is occurring in our communities and present it to those who can influence our continued growth.”

The Commissioner’s Office and the Leadership Adams organization partnered to create Capitol Day to provide a forum for conveying their message that “we are Adams County and we are open for business”.

The list of speakers for the day-long event included not only DeWine, but also Secretary of State John Husted, Lieutenant-Governor Mary Taylor, State Senator Joe Uecker, State Representative Terry Johnson, and ODNR Director Jim Zehringer.

Also present was Adams County native, and former State Senator Doug White who told the group, “Leadership is not complicated. The thing I learned growing up on a farm in Adams County is that you get a whole lot more hay in the barn by being out there working with the boys than you do sitting in the shade yelling at them. Same applies at the Statehouse, or in your business or agency.

Among the issues addressed were the heroin epidemic, the energy crisis, water quality, climate change, economic opportunities, and job growth.

Attorney General DeWine spoke about the heroin epidemic, telling those present: “It’s everywhere, every economic group, every social group, every race.” He said that his office believes that approximately three-quarters of all heroin addicts began as legal prescription users. “People get injured and become addicted to prescribed drugs, then later switch to heroin after their prescriptions runs out.” He added, “Heroin starts out as a $15-a-day habit, and builds to a $1500-a-day habit. Very few people have that kind of money, so they rip off their families and friends. We help local law enforcement fight the problem, but we’re not going to arrest our way out of this situation.”

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These members of the Leadership Adams Youth program met with State Senator Joe Uecker and State Representative Terry Johnson during Capitol Day. Pictured here are, from left, Josey Scott, Taylor Wylie, Senator Uecker, Tyker Ryan, Representative Johnson, Daisee Young, and Karlie Harper. Photo by Patricia Beech

DeWine recognized the multiple community programs that have arisen in Adams County in response to the drug epidemic, saying, “Communities are taking action because their children have died. Everyone needs to be involved – churches, businesses, and education need to be involved in this grassroots effort.”

There was also a panel discussion about the forces driving change in the energy market. Panel members included Kate Barter – Project Manager for the Appalachian Partnership for Economic Growth; Tom Raga – VP of External Affairs for DP&L; and Josh Knights, President of the Nature Conservancy.

Members of the Adams County coalition discussed several economic and social issues with Secretary of State John Husted, among them – the need for jobs.

Tad Mitchell, Career and Technical Supervisor for Ohio Valley School District, told the Secretary: “We happen to have a very skilled workforce in Adams County, unfortunately many of our students have to travel long distances to find high-paying jobs, or they choose to relocate, which is a brain-drain for the county, and that’s not what we want.”

Mitchell explained that those who choose to remain and work in Adams County are most often underemployed because there aren’t many high-paying jobs. “Coal is on it’s way out, and we have two coal-burning power plants that employ over 800 people in Adams County, they make up a large part of our tax base, and they have a life expectancy of only five to ten years. If they pull out and we have no other forms of jobs being created, it could leave our county even more devastated.”

Commissioner Paul Worley addressed the county’s energy issues, informing Husted of his office’s effort to bring natural gas into the area. “We’ve put together an informal group between GE, who has their test aviation site in Adams County, and DP&L which has two coal-fired power plants along the river,” said Worley. We’ve met with Duke Energy, we’ve met with Columbia Natural Gas, but unfortunately, we’re in an area without gas lines.”

Worley said that gas companies were interested in building in the county but without a major user, short of converting one of the power plants to natural gas, there was little hope they could recoup their investments. “There’s just not a lot of hope that they’ll invest over 50 million dollars to bring the pipeline in from Jackson, or from Mt. Orab. It’s a significant capital investment that they wouldn’t get back because we have a small population, but we’re keeping our options open, to be ready to capitalize on it when an opportunity does arise.”

The day’s events ended at the Governor’s Mansion where a new “Adams County Rock” was presented to the First Lady’s assistant, to be placed in the First Lady’s garden.

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