Ryan, Sowards lead Lady Indians to easy win in season opener, 57-36 over Felicity Senior Profile: Wes Hayslip Justice off to hot start at VSU County boys’ squads on display in annual SHAC Preview Night ‘Operation Christmas Child’ collects 1,707 shoe boxes for needy children Two animal cruelty cases investigated in Adams County DP&L considers closing power-generating plants in county Holiday spirit makes an early appearance in Adams County Chester A Mann Jeffrey A Daley Sr Michael G Tincher DAR sponsors Good Citizen Award Ohio’s young hunters harvest nearly 6,000 deer during Youth Gun Season Senior Profile: Kayle Thomas Helen N Hiestand Rev Walter R Egnor Sr Betty Beam Jamie L Corrill Jeffrey L Heppard Edsel L Massey Jr It is time to stop and take time to give thanks on a special day Another year to be very thankful for Senior Profile: Savannah McCoy McCoy signs to continue golf career at SSU North Adams hosts SHAC Girls Preview DAR commemorates 50th anniversary of Vietnam War Historical Society honors veterans Star Wars routine leads Fancy Free Cloggers to ‘America’s Got Talent’ A Day at the Opera Eagle Creek draws community to Thanksgiving celebration Ward ekes out victory over Worley in county commissioner race Mary A Garman Ronald L Palmer Joseph S McClanahan II Emma O Hayslip Devils slip by Georgetown in Foundation Game Hupp, Hunter, Wolke named OSSCA Second Team All-State Senior Profile: Kain Turner Lady Devils romp in Foundation Game Oh, those aromas coming from Mom’s kitchen What Became My Biggest Project Deer gun season set to begin ‘Trees to Textbooks’ shares revenues with local schools and communities BREAKING NEWS Winchester’s Baxter wins Miss Ohio USA 2017 pageant Genny Elkins Pauline S Stevenson Donald E Lewis Sr Charlotte R Seaman Ruth Prater Bennie Skaggs Gertrude Swayne West Union High School hosts impressive Veterans Day ceremonies Peebles Elementary hosts ceremony to honor local veterans Duke Energy exits Killen and Stuart Plants GE Aviation hosts annual Veterans Day celebration Senior Profile: Logan Gordley Jeffrey A Brown Sr Peebles Library welcomes local author and survivor on Nov. 19 Homer C Eldridge Robert W Schomberg One Commissioner race too close to call in unofficial count Voters approve majority of county levies on Tuesday’s election ballot NAES Sixth Graders practice the democratic process Honoring one who gave the ‘last full measure of devotion’ Overcoming adversity, veteran of Iraq War opens local business Senior Profile: Ben Figgins Senior Profile: Macy Mullenix SHAC Basketball Previews are set for Nov. 18 and 25 Trio of local golfers finish careers with trip to the highest level of high school competition Peebles sophomore Jenny Seas finishes sixth in OHSAA state cross-country meet Upset win sends Trump to the White House ACRMC awarded plaque for 50 years of service Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for First Nine Week Grading Period BREAKING ELECTION NEWS! Senior Profile: Jordyn Kell Orlie H Kirker Military homecoming at NAES Second half spells doom as Greyhounds fall to Hillcrest 42-12 in finale Senior Profile: Sarah McFarland WU’s Horton will continue golf career at SSU Lady Devils’ season ends in heartbreak with 3-2 loss in District championship battle Christine R. Ritchey Operation Christmas Child begins Nov. 14 Mental Health levy on tomorrow’s ballot Wanda L. Nixon David Rogers Robert “Bobby” Leonard Keneth Waters Commissioner Worley seeks re-election Republican challenger vies for Commissioner’s seat Charles Cooper Thelma J White Kayleigh L Crothers AEP Ohio employees support Breast Cancer Awareness Month WUHS holds annual Beta Club and Honor Society inductions When Saturday mornings belonged to the kids of the house Senior Profile: Gloria Purdin Green-White Night, OHSAA Meeting at WUHS on Nov. 9

Getting our money’s worth from the Philco

web1_RickHouser.jpgBy Rick Houser – People’s Defender

It is hard for our older generation to accept this new generations’ additions to our world, but for as long as I can remember one item that crossed always generation line with ease. That was the addition of the radio. Many of my earliest memories involve seeing or hearing a radio playing. The radio had been around in its earliest forms, beginningwith the crystal set that barely brought in one channel and that only one person could listen to on head phones, lasting until after World War II. (If you don’t know what a crystal set is don’t feel bad, just Google it.)

But in the 1950’s came the electric radio. I remember an old cracked and chipped radio with the white faded to a near brown, bringing in almost exclusively WLW’s channel. Later in the 50’s or maybe around 1960, Dad went to New Richmond to A.P. Appliance and bought a brand new PHILCO AM radio. Dad declared it a family present since it was Christmas time. My sister and brother jumped on that radio immediately as it picked up four or five channels clearly. Technology progess right in front of our eyes. There were three places around our home that I recall this new treat being plugged in.

The main spot was in the kitchen. Dad and Mom played it in the morning to get the weather report and to hear the livestock and produce prices that were to open the market that day. This was considered important as those prices told Dad what to expect for his crops and animals at sale time and the weather dictated what we would or wouldn’t be doing that day.

In the evening the dial was turned to WSAI where we got the rock and roll music. It was Peg and Ben’s chore to clean up the evening dishes and put them away. As they were doing this they timed it to be between 5 and 6 p.m. because that was when the top ten song list was played in order from number 10 to number one just as the clock was coming up on 6. Now any teenager worth their weight in gold kept up with the top songs of the day and Peg and Ben and their little brother were no exception, so as the number one song was announced, the evening dishes were finished at the same time. They did have it timed perfectly.

The second place I recall seeing the radio was seasonal, as the months that we stripped tobacco that radio came to the stripping room. Dad had a small shelf up over the work bench and out of harm of being knocked down or broken. As best I can remember, it seemed as though the radio was above and in front of my Dad. He allowed Ben and Peg to play the rock and roll channel during the morning and afternoons, but it had to be played at a low volume. This was a fair compromise to them as they got to break the “old stories told” monotony and got to hear the coolest music.

When mid-morning and noon rolled around, Dad turned it to the stock and produce reports and sometimes the weather if he was looking for weather that might affect our work. This deal not only worked for my brother and sister but it worked for me also and my friends that helped as they quickly understood the agreement. There were no exceptions when Dad was in the stripping room. I guess that since Dad bought the Philco, he got to make the rules. As far as I’m concerned, that rule still stands.

The third place I recall the radio being plugged was on the summer evenings when it was plugged in on the closed-in porch and placed in a window so that we could listen to the Reds on radio as seldom were they on the TV in those days. It would be anyone’s guess as to how many ball games were heard as we sat around breaking green beans or lima beans or shelling peas. We raised big gardens and Mom felt it only fair that we all got the privilege of grabbing a newspaper and a hand full of beans to help break them. Even folks who stopped by to visit or see Dad on Trustee business would grab a paper and a seat and as we talked and broke beans we listened to Marty and Joe on theradio. I doubt if many of us can remember the score of any game, but somone always spoke up if the radio hadn’t turned on.

That PHILCO that was white and light green logged a lot of air time with my family. We had good reasons to be playing this new electronic device, it supplied entertainment to us. Even if we weren’t supposed to have fun working, we did thanks to our radio. One other thing about that radio was that it only brought in AM stations, mainly because FM had not been invented yet. But as odd as this sounds, we derived more than enough entertainment through those speakers than maybe could be pulled up through all the stations available today. At least it feels that way.

News, weather, comedy, sports, and music. That covers an awful lot of what we still look for today. Dad always said that it was money well spent and Peg, Ben, myself, and even my Mom agreed that the PHILCO had earned its place of respect in our family for a job well done.

Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and likes to share stories about his youth and other topics. He may be reached at houser734@yahoo.com.

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