Fred G Davis Ohio Valley FFA Officers for 2016-17 named ACRMC Emergency Care Center renamed after Dr. Bruce Ashley West Union holds football Homecoming festivities First graders pick the Sheriff Cross honored by ODNR with the prestigious Cardinal Award Renowned Ohio artist visits WUHS Don and Venita Bowles named 2016 Outstanding Fair Supporters PES students part of new Lego League Ferno donates $2,500 to OVCTC From the cistern to the city water Basketball officiating class being offered in October Peebles rolls by West Union in straight sets Par for the course, Dragons sweep SHAC Golf titles Greyhounds hang on late for first win of 2016 season You have to understand the process to understand the job Alex K Miller Ann E Campbell Scott N Atkinson Senior Profile: Tyler Fowler Martin named to All-Tourney Team in North/South Battlefield Classic 200 years on the banks of the Ohio, in a little town called Moscow Edwin P Prince ACRMC Emergency Care Center renamed after Dr. Bruce Ashley Volleyball teams honor young cancer patient MHS honors veterans during pregame Kirker Covered Bridge gets a ‘Brown Goose’ facelift Adams County Heritage Days are Sept. 30-Oct. 1 Lady Devils prevail 1-0 over Peebles on Kickin’ Cancer Night Senior Profile: Patrick Baldwin Michael W Milby James R Grooms Sr. Fall Festival crowns Little Miss and Mister UPDATE: Pike County multiple murder Investigation; redacted autopsy reports released West Union Elementary names August Students of the Month SHAC streak continues for North Adams volleyball West Union volleyball picks up a pair of W’s Animal Shelter booth sees record crowds at Old Timer’s Day Festival Dragons top Manchester in Defender Bowl battle, 28-22 Senior Profile: Kendall Gallowitz Lady Dragons grab early lead in SHAC Tourney, final round is coming Friday Another Old Timer’s Days in the books and successful Run Gio Foundation to hold Oct. 1 benefit in Adams County Betty L Kelley Tom Cross, ACTVB Director, to receive ODNR Cardinal Award Seaman Fall Festival begins Wednesday, runs through Saturday Dragons still lead after two rounds of SHAC Golf, McCarty tops individual leader board Lady Dragons get SHAC win, downing Fayetteville 3-1 Overcoming obstacles, Pennywitt etches his name in MHS record books Dragons take first day lead in SHAC Golf Tourney New drug treatment offers more hope for recovering addicts Ronnie G Nace Lucille Wright Lois M Bixler Time to change those soccer rules Senior Profile: Hannah Grimes ‘Cruising up and down the main drag all night long’ Community effort erects town clock S Bridge to be replaced on Graces Run Road Senior Profile: Brittany Caldwell Lady Dragons break ACCC course record Dragons roll in county gridiron battle Down to last play, Hounds fall in heartbreaker I never won, but those lawn games were special times Donnie Austin Shari R Hiltibran Bentonville hosts 40th Annual Harvest Festival West Union soccer teams sweep Williamsburg, St. Patrick “Rockin” the mats again Senior Profile: Brittany Caldwell Sylvester Mefford Local teens selected to State 4-H Teen Leadership Council Connect with Serpent Mound over Old Timer’s Days Guthrie to speak about pests and diseases in beekeeping Old Timers Days Festival Cornhole Tournament is this week Defender Bowl coming Thursday Bentonville Harvest Festival holds Toddler Pageants 40th Anniversary Bentonville Harvest Festival hosts Baby Show 9/11 Reminds Us That We Are All Americans Lady Dragons are 2016 County Cup winners Bob Birchfield Senior Profile: Ryan Henderson Dragons take JV golf match Another rough night for Greyhounds, Notre Dame rolls to big win Remembering 9/11-15 years later Hughes honored at GABP Concussions and Youth Sports Roberta Newman to retire after more than 46 years at First State Bank Reaching out to the Baton Rouge flood victims Bentonville Harvest Festival celebrates its 40th anniversary Fire it up! Annual Jr. Fair BBQ cooks up another savory fare Lady Indians take down Whiteoak in four sets Senior Profile: Zack Best Greyhounds produce three winners at the 2016 Dragon Run Lady Hounds win in five sets at West Union Teresa Houdeshell Rosa Grooms Roy C Shiveley Mathew R Potts Staggs and Louiso to visit nation’s capital
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Giving a gift of life

Receiving a donor kidney from an unknown, deceased donor is a gift of life to anyone in need of a transplant. Receiving an organ donation from a living family member makes the gift even more meaningful, when you consider the risks and sacrifices associated with making that choice.

Tim Davis, Principal at Peebles High School, experienced that gift when his son, Aaron, offered to become his living kidney donor. Ten years ago, Tim was dying and his kidney disease was progressing rapidly, while the donor list was progressing hardly at all. He was fast approaching the point of dialysis when Aaron stepped forward, “You need one, I got one,” he told his father.

“I was resistant to it at first, I think any parent would be” said Davis, “It seemed too risky, but I got to thinking about the fact that I’d lost my own father when I was 23, and how much of a void his death left in my life. Aaron was 18 then, and I didn’t want that to happen to him. I realized I would have done the same thing to save my father, and I didn’t want my son to go through life without his father.”

Unlike most people who develop kidney disease, Davis had none of the major risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or a family history of kidney failure.

His disease was the result of an adverse reaction to a dose of penicillin he’d been given when he was 18 months old. He wasn’t even aware that he had a kidney disease until his doctor discovered it in 2001 during a regular check up.

“Dr. Lim was my doctor. During her residency in the Philippines she’d seen the same kind of kidney damage in children, caused by over use of penicillin and allergic reactions to the drug. It was by the grace of God that I had a doctor who knew from her past experience what was causing my kidneys to fail. Most people who have this don’t know until their kidneys actually do fail.”

After his diagnosis, Tim began treatment, but over the next six years the disease progressed into end-stage renal failure.

“It progressed fairly quickly,” Tim recalled. “I was on a waiting list for a donor after they’d tested several family members and none matched close enough. I was holding out for a donor kidney from a cadaver. I was still working, but I was horribly ill from all the poisons and toxins in my body.”

Being on the national transplant waiting list required that Tim never be more than one hour away from Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, where he was being treated. “If they called you had one hour to get there or the kidney would go to someone else. Being on the list controls your life, you have to give up a lot of things.”

By 2006 Tim’s doctor’s wanted to start dialysis, but he wanted to hold out for a donor.

Aaron was 13 years old when his father was diagnosed. “I didn’t really comprehend the full meaning of what was happening to my Dad, but five years later, I was in college and I came to understand what it was all about.”

He came forward and told his father he wanted to be tested, he wanted to donate his kidney.

“People would say that’s awesome, or that must be really intense for you, but I thought it was what I was supposed to do,” Aaron said. “If you have the opportunity to save your parent’s life, why wouldn’t you do it? If I’m physically capable of doing it, I should do it because it’s the right thing to do. I felt God was saying I was supposed to do this.”

Even though he was deeply squeamish about needles, he set aside his fear and began the testing process.

“The first few times Aaron went to Christ Hospital, he’d get light-headed when they’d draw blood.” Tim laughs, “The last few times he went the nurses had a bed and wet towels ready for him.”

The tests revealed Aaron was a near perfect match, and the following Tuesday, both he and his father were being prepped for surgery.

“They took Aaron into surgery first,” Tim says. “I had a supernatural peace come over me before the surgery, it felt right. Still, you see your son being rolled down the hallway and you know what’s going to happen, and that’s a worry.”

The following morning Aaron called his father. “He sounded strong, healthy, and chipper,” Tim recalled. “As a parent that made me feel a lot better.”

Aaron left the hospital on Thursday, just two days after the surgery, and Tim followed on Saturday.

“The kidney recipient feels better instantly,” Tim explains, but the donor’s body has to adjust to losing a kidney, Aaron was tired all the time for several months afterward, until his remaining kidney grew enough to meet his body’s demands.”

Today, both father and son are in good health, and share not only a pair of kidneys, but also a deep and abiding appreciation for the gift of life.

March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is urging all Americans to give their kidneys a second thought and a well-deserved checkup.

According to the NKF website, 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. Major risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure and being age 60 or older.

Kidney disease often has no symptoms, and it can go undetected until very advanced. But a simple urine test can tell if kidney disease is present. It’s important to get tested because early detection and treatment can slow or prevent the progression of the disease.

During National Kidney Month in March, and in honor of World Kidney Day on March 14, the NKF offers health activities to promote awareness of kidneys, risk factors and kidney disease.

Free Screenings are provided throughout the month of March for those most at risk for kidney disease. Locations and information can be found on the calendar on their website at https://www.kidney.org/news/monthly/ Focus_ KidneyMonth

The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk.

Father and son, Tim and Aaron Davis. Aaron was a living kidney donor for his father.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_Davis.jpgFather and son, Tim and Aaron Davis. Aaron was a living kidney donor for his father. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender
A son gives his father the gift of life with living donor kidney

By Patricia Beech

People’s Defender

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at pbeech@peoplesdefender.com

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2016 People's Defender