Lady Indians go down in straight sets to Valley in sectional play Manchester hosts the inaugural Southern Ohio Cheer Challenge NAHS girls claim soccer sectional title Seas siblings are SHAC Cross-Country champions Lady Devils will collect fourth consecutive SHAC gold ball trophy Lady Hounds ousted in sectional tourney opener Peebles Lions Club holding Thanksgiving fund raiser FFA Fruit sales have begun, run until Nov. 18 Historical marker is repaired PES will present ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Eagle Creek Health and Rehabilitation Center Open House showcases new unit PES teacher honored by ACOVSD Board Friends of North Adams Library dedicate new brick Veterans Memorial Senior Profile: Landon Wright Geneva E Vogler Susan L Kremin Local golf teams complete play at state tournament Lady Dragons make school history with tournament win Browning gets hands-on look at NASA’s latest robotics Local beautician celebrates 80th birthday Health Department appeals to November voters Betty R Toller Senior Profile: Craig Horton Helen F Hoffer Super Saturday at Freedom Field Lady Dragons hang on for five-set victory over Manchester Seventh Grade Lady Hounds are SHAC Tournament champions Peebles Elementary announces September Students of the Month Rideout’s Muffler celebrating 40th anniversary this month Senior Citizens levy will appear on November ballot Bonnie J Orr Dorothy M Edenfield Senior Profile: Grace Barge Jerry Paquette Dragons get big 38-20 win at Green Manchester takes varsity team titles at West Union Invitational Lady Devils knock off Peebles on Volley For the Cure Night Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Senior Profile: Kelsey Friend Lady Dragons finish as District Runners-Up Sectional pairings announced for volleyball and soccer 2 and 3 and worried is me Patricia Clift Adams County Humane Agent saves abandoned dogs and puppies Tourism had major economic impact on Adams County in 2015 Senator Portman brings his campaign to Adams County Betty E Lawson Sanborn NAHS holds National Honor Society induction ceremonies Harlan W Benjamin Joyce A Lafferty Senior Profile: Lee Hesler Dragons get SHAC win, 2-1 over Fairfield North Adams tops Peebles in ‘Kickin Cancer’ battles Double duty coming at Boys’ State Golf Tournament as West Union and North Adams both qualify Humane Society providing ‘Straws For Paws’ North Adams Elementary honors students and staff Russell Rockwell Julie L Wagner Hobert C Robinson Samuel D McClellan Brenda S Bare Clarencce Walker Jr Dolly M Hilterbrandt Jack Roush Day returns to Manchester West Union FFA has busy opening to school year ODOT opens new full-service Maintenance Facility Peebles Elementary introduces Peer Mentoring program Frost is recipient of Morgan Memorial Scholarship Peebles Fire Department has a new addition Heritage Days return to Tranquility Wheat Ridge Olde Thyme Herb Fair and Harvest Festival begins Friday Caraway Farm hosts annual Pumpkin Festival ‘Run Gio’ makes a visit to Adams County Senior Profile: Mackenzie Smith West Union, North Adams grab top two spots in Division III golf sectional tournament This memory will live with me forever Will M Stern West Union and North Adams-State Bound! Lillian N Smith Betty R Shelton Barbara ER Bohl Brenda Farley Senior Profile: Caitlyn Bradford Dragons roar to 40-0 Homecoming victory Greyhounds take three of four races at annual Adams County Meet Monarch Meadows holds grand opening Discovering a touch of glass on Erie’s Shores Junior L Conaway William B Brumley Sr Fred G Davis Ohio Valley FFA Officers for 2016-17 named ACRMC Emergency Care Center renamed after Dr. Bruce Ashley West Union holds football Homecoming festivities First graders pick the Sheriff Cross honored by ODNR with the prestigious Cardinal Award Renowned Ohio artist visits WUHS Don and Venita Bowles named 2016 Outstanding Fair Supporters PES students part of new Lego League Ferno donates $2,500 to OVCTC From the cistern to the city water

Giving a gift of life

Receiving a donor kidney from an unknown, deceased donor is a gift of life to anyone in need of a transplant. Receiving an organ donation from a living family member makes the gift even more meaningful, when you consider the risks and sacrifices associated with making that choice.

Tim Davis, Principal at Peebles High School, experienced that gift when his son, Aaron, offered to become his living kidney donor. Ten years ago, Tim was dying and his kidney disease was progressing rapidly, while the donor list was progressing hardly at all. He was fast approaching the point of dialysis when Aaron stepped forward, “You need one, I got one,” he told his father.

“I was resistant to it at first, I think any parent would be” said Davis, “It seemed too risky, but I got to thinking about the fact that I’d lost my own father when I was 23, and how much of a void his death left in my life. Aaron was 18 then, and I didn’t want that to happen to him. I realized I would have done the same thing to save my father, and I didn’t want my son to go through life without his father.”

Unlike most people who develop kidney disease, Davis had none of the major risk factors such as diabetes, high blood pressure, or a family history of kidney failure.

His disease was the result of an adverse reaction to a dose of penicillin he’d been given when he was 18 months old. He wasn’t even aware that he had a kidney disease until his doctor discovered it in 2001 during a regular check up.

“Dr. Lim was my doctor. During her residency in the Philippines she’d seen the same kind of kidney damage in children, caused by over use of penicillin and allergic reactions to the drug. It was by the grace of God that I had a doctor who knew from her past experience what was causing my kidneys to fail. Most people who have this don’t know until their kidneys actually do fail.”

After his diagnosis, Tim began treatment, but over the next six years the disease progressed into end-stage renal failure.

“It progressed fairly quickly,” Tim recalled. “I was on a waiting list for a donor after they’d tested several family members and none matched close enough. I was holding out for a donor kidney from a cadaver. I was still working, but I was horribly ill from all the poisons and toxins in my body.”

Being on the national transplant waiting list required that Tim never be more than one hour away from Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, where he was being treated. “If they called you had one hour to get there or the kidney would go to someone else. Being on the list controls your life, you have to give up a lot of things.”

By 2006 Tim’s doctor’s wanted to start dialysis, but he wanted to hold out for a donor.

Aaron was 13 years old when his father was diagnosed. “I didn’t really comprehend the full meaning of what was happening to my Dad, but five years later, I was in college and I came to understand what it was all about.”

He came forward and told his father he wanted to be tested, he wanted to donate his kidney.

“People would say that’s awesome, or that must be really intense for you, but I thought it was what I was supposed to do,” Aaron said. “If you have the opportunity to save your parent’s life, why wouldn’t you do it? If I’m physically capable of doing it, I should do it because it’s the right thing to do. I felt God was saying I was supposed to do this.”

Even though he was deeply squeamish about needles, he set aside his fear and began the testing process.

“The first few times Aaron went to Christ Hospital, he’d get light-headed when they’d draw blood.” Tim laughs, “The last few times he went the nurses had a bed and wet towels ready for him.”

The tests revealed Aaron was a near perfect match, and the following Tuesday, both he and his father were being prepped for surgery.

“They took Aaron into surgery first,” Tim says. “I had a supernatural peace come over me before the surgery, it felt right. Still, you see your son being rolled down the hallway and you know what’s going to happen, and that’s a worry.”

The following morning Aaron called his father. “He sounded strong, healthy, and chipper,” Tim recalled. “As a parent that made me feel a lot better.”

Aaron left the hospital on Thursday, just two days after the surgery, and Tim followed on Saturday.

“The kidney recipient feels better instantly,” Tim explains, but the donor’s body has to adjust to losing a kidney, Aaron was tired all the time for several months afterward, until his remaining kidney grew enough to meet his body’s demands.”

Today, both father and son are in good health, and share not only a pair of kidneys, but also a deep and abiding appreciation for the gift of life.

March is National Kidney Month and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is urging all Americans to give their kidneys a second thought and a well-deserved checkup.

According to the NKF website, 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. Major risk factors include diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure and being age 60 or older.

Kidney disease often has no symptoms, and it can go undetected until very advanced. But a simple urine test can tell if kidney disease is present. It’s important to get tested because early detection and treatment can slow or prevent the progression of the disease.

During National Kidney Month in March, and in honor of World Kidney Day on March 14, the NKF offers health activities to promote awareness of kidneys, risk factors and kidney disease.

Free Screenings are provided throughout the month of March for those most at risk for kidney disease. Locations and information can be found on the calendar on their website at Focus_ KidneyMonth

The National Kidney Foundation is the leading organization in the U.S. dedicated to the awareness, prevention and treatment of kidney disease for hundreds of thousands of healthcare professionals, millions of patients and their families, and tens of millions of Americans at risk.

Father and son, Tim and Aaron Davis. Aaron was a living kidney donor for his father. and son, Tim and Aaron Davis. Aaron was a living kidney donor for his father. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender
A son gives his father the gift of life with living donor kidney

By Patricia Beech

People’s Defender

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at

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