Marvin Setty Richard G Waldron Grand Marshals selected for West Union Fourth of July Parade Adams County, Maysville Vet team up to save injured dog Michael S Knauff Victor P Price Success builds from the bottom up Finalists named for 2017 Fair Queen Contest William Glenn DeWine, Reader Call For Tips in Rhoden Murder Investigation MHS principal to take superintendent post Peebles Skate Park now a reality 2017-18 Fur and Feather Ambassadors named Caley Grooms is Cattlemen’s Beef Ambassador Dr. Mueller leaving Health Department’s free clinic Hourglass Quilt Barn returning to Adams County Lung, Thornburg are First Team All-District selections North Adams hosts annual Boys Basketball Camps Walk-off winner Wanda Hill George D Johnson Life can be a juggling act My favorite thing to do on the farm Wolves in Adams County! Ronald L Wedmore Three lessons from Dad Donald D Morgan Wenstrup uninjured in Virginia shooting Portman staff to hold grant funding workshop Raymond E Applegate Keeping the Peebles tradition alive Back on the hardwood, local hoops squads compete in Monday Night League Seven county athletes recognized as All-SHAC Baseball honorees Stepping to the podium Lady Hounds host Youth Volleyball Camp Senior Profile: Bryan Young Junior Deputy Boot Camps kick off in Manchester Hayes pleads “not guilty” to 109 counts Six-year-old girl finds long-lost class ring Jefferson Alumni awards annual scholarships Paul Tate Jr Marcus I Cox Jewell Gill James M Hill Jr Jeffrey S Jones Samuel A Disher Jack Sterling BREAKING NEWS: Parents face charges after son overdoses on opiate License Hikes and Tall Turkey Tales Danger under every rock Reigning Miss Ohio USA will judge 2017 Adams County Fair Queen Pageant Gordley’s hoops career will continue at Mount St. Joseph Russell C Newman Kenneth C Thurman George Uebel Summer Reading Program underway Honor Flight carries local veteran to DC When rescuers become victims Passing the torch, West Union hosts week-long basketball camp for future Dragons SENIOR PROFILE: Sara Knechtly Terry L Powell Willie Shreffler James C Fitzpatrick Senior Profile: Austin Parks Six countians named to All-SHAC Softball squad Lady Indians get summer camp season underway Memorial Day services pay tribute to local veterans WUHS Steel Band will perform at Bogart’s SSCC announces Honors Lists for spring semester Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for final nine weeks West Union Elementary announces Honor Roll for fourth nine weeks Back to State! Mom calls daughter “living proof” seat belts save lives Rent-2-Own donation means new soccer scoreboard at WUHS NAHS student selected for Engineering Summer Camp Southern Hills Athletic Conferences honors Spring Sports athletes Senior Profile: Kailyn Boyd Madison Welch receives Riffle Scholarship Junior Achievement Volunteers visit county’s seventh graders Marcella J Abbott James Ratliff Gladys Davitz Harry G Shupert Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley

The Amish Cook

Regular readers know that I’ve been editor of this column for 25 years this July. I could fill a page about how naïve I was when I began this venture at age 18 or with tales of how fast time seems to have evaporated since those days. But I won’t do that this time. I just want to thank readers and newspapers for coming back week after week for a glimpse of a life that too often eludes us. For all their human flaws, the richness of the Amish faith and closeness of family bonds are still something that seem increasingly missing from today’s society. That void has only grown in the past 25 years and I thank Gloria for helping to fill it.

Speaking of 25 years, I am nostalgically preparing to mothball two books that have become classics over the years. Through March readers can purchase copies The Best of The Amish Cook, Vol 1 (1991 – 1996) and The Best of The Amish Cook, Vol. 2 (1996 – 2001). These books allow you to read the Amish Cook column and recipes in chronological order from the beginning. Each book is approximately 200 pages and packed with columns, recipes, and nostalgic. The books will not be available again after March. To order both books, send $40 to Oasis Newsfeatures, PO Box 157, Middletown, Ohio 45042. Additional sets can be ordered for $20 apiece. Individual titles can be ordered for $25 (includes shipping).

Meanwhile, A couple of Amish people are on my mind this week, people that, in their own small ways, helped shape the Amish we know today. Perhaps as I approach my mid-40s and am a father the losses sting a little deeper and make me ponder my own contributions more.

People come and go and that’s one of the enduring life lessons, I think, as one gets older: friends vanish and reappear like ghostly apparitions but family is enduring and endearing. There are two Amish men I’d like to remember this week who’s families miss them greatly:

Ammon C. Raber: Gloria’s grandfather, Ammon Raber, 80, passed away last week. There was a visitation and funeral to plan and goodbyes to say, so I offered Gloria a week off to regroup and she gratefully accepted. I’ve met many Amish over the years, but it was a single quirky leap of imagination that I’ll always remember Ammon Raber for. Ammon Raber’s creation was a stroke of Amish ingenuity, a talisman to the richness and resourcefulness coursing through their culture. When I first saw it, I had to look several times. But, no, I wasn’t seeing things. Shimmering in the summer sun in his driveway was a golf cart that had been gutted and modified and looked like no Amish buggy I had ever seen before.

It was actually a golf cart that he bought and then modified to become a “buggy.” He gutted the insides of all electronic components, painted it black, and added buggy shafts. The results was a souped up golf cart/buggy hybrid. Ammon explained the advantage of the golf cart was that he a he and his wife could avoid a tough climb up into a buggy, something that can be tough for senior citizen Amish. It can be quite a climb even for the young and fit. The “senior citizen” friendly buggy became so popular that he had several orders from others for more like it.

Monroe Hoschtetler: This week also marked the passing of another Amish man who certainly made a mark in his 84 years. I was saddened to hear of the passing of Monroe Hoschstetler, 84, last week in Belle Center, Ohio.

Monroe was a big part of one of the most interesting experiments in Amish history: an attempt to start a community in Honduras during the 1970s. The effort is recounted in rich, riveting detail by Amish author Joseph Stoll and his family in the book “Sunshine and Shadow: Our 7 Years in Honduras.”

A group of Old Order Amish families decided in the late 60s that they wanted to spread their way of life to areas that were less fortunate. This was a time when Amish society (like the rest of society) was going through some wrenching changes. After living largely in agrarian isolation in the United States, the national economy was lurching and changing and bringing the Amish along for the ride. Farming, for a variety of reasons detailed in the book, was becoming less and less viable. So some Amish hatched a plan to start a settlement in a place where their farming would be appreciated and contribute to society. They chose Honduras.

Monroe Hoschtetler was a minister in the Honduras community. Starting a settlement from scratch so far from home entailed numerous challenges and, in the end, competing visions of the settlement’s future tore it apart. Today, little trace of it remains. I had the chance to meet Monroe Hoschtetler once when he was visiting and preaching in Montana. He was a wise, elder statesman with a flowing white beard who captivated me with tales of Honduras. I’ve met others who were a part of that experiment. It took tremendous courage and helped infuse Hispanic influence into Amish cooking. Dorcas Martin, an Amish woman in Aylmer, Ontario, remembers her parents being part of the Honduras community and she shared a popular recipe from there with us. She said they’d add a little lettuce or chili sauce to the folded up tortilla.

Homemade corn tortillas

2 cups corn flour

1 /2 teaspoons alt

1 – 1 1 /4 cups warm water

Combine the corn flour and salt in a small mixing bowl. Add 1 cup of water, a little at a time, as you continue to mix the ingredients. Knead the dough, adding more water if necessary to keep the dough moist and holding its shape. Let the rough rest for 25 – 30 minutes.

Divide the dough into 12 balls, each the size of a medium egg. Press and pat the balls into a tortilla shape or use a tortilla press Place each tortilla on an ungreased hot griddle and cook until golden brown. When the bubbling stops turn the tortilla and brown the other side. Remove from the griddle while the tortilla is pliable. Stack the finish tortillas to keep them moist and warm. Use immediately or allow to cool.

A “golf cart” buggy, a creation by Gloria’s grandfather who passed away this week. (Kevin Williams photo)
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_golfcartbuggy.jpgA “golf cart” buggy, a creation by Gloria’s grandfather who passed away this week. (Kevin Williams photo)

http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/web1_amish-cook-logo.jpg

By Kevin Williams,

Amish Cook Editor

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