Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders There will be trouble in River City! Monna L Fitzgerald test pdf viewer Jesse Carrington Janice M Sowards Rhoden family members make plea for tips in Pike Co murders of loved ones Quilting – the art that’s no longer just for Grandma Young is Adams County recipient of Franklin B. Walter All-Scholastic Award Wenstrup recognized as Community Health Advocate Ready, set, go! 25th annual Egg Hunt draws hundreds Applicants needed for Adams County Fair Queen Humane Society encourages responsible animal ownership ACCS holds annual Science Fair Peebles Elementary names March Students of the Month Pierce fires perfect game as Peebles blanks West Union Hunters preparing for 2017 Wild Turkey Season Lady Hounds fall 12-3 at Lynchburg Dragons lose early lead, drop SHAC match up with Fayetteville, 13-6 Senior Profile: Isaiah Anderson Devils roll to big SHAC win at Ripley Despite soggy night, WUHS hosts annual Invitational Meet Celebrities for a night George F Carr Jr Teresa S Hoskins Mary B McClure Richard B Collins Randall D Fetters Former Manchester officer indicted on five counts WUHS student wins state Beta Club Secretary’s seat OVCTC students part of state competition S.R. 73 closed for culvert replacement Peebles Lions Club holds first Easter Egg Hunt Weyrich graduates with honors from Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics North Adams Elementary releases Honor Roll for Third grading Period Scholarships available from Jefferson Alumni Olympic athlete speaks at April 6 SAAM event Venture Hawks end their basketball season with a victory at WUHS Devils baseball sweeps doubleheader from Northwest Greyhounds gain SHAC split, split twinbill with East England signs with Rio Grande golf Pierce fans 16, Lady Indians blank Eastern Brown 4-0 Maybe somebody on the river does have a plan Senior Profile: Ryan Dryden Enjoying the view Still a time for celebration Carl R Brown Lena R Staggs Adams County Crews Schedule Culvert Replacement Projects Merlan Shoemaker Dwayne E Thompson Help is on the line! West Union Elementary honors February Students of the Month WUHS hosts 2017 All-County Arts and Music Festival Ohio Brush Creek Canoe/Kayak Access Grand Opening set for April 20 Kasich cracks down on opiate-based prescriptions West Union High School students have successful trip to State Beta Convention North Adams Beta Club excels at State Convention ACRMC hosts annual Health Fair Robert H Bushman Senior Profile: Skylar Newman Nine-run inning leads Lady Hounds to run rule win over West Union WUHS foursome breaks school record First county baseball battle goes to the Greyhounds On the road, Lady Indians pick up two more SHAC victories Senior Profile: Christa Williams One more ‘shining moment’ for SHAC seniors at C103 All-Star Game Esie M Chandler Phyllis Adkins Former Manchester police deputy faces Grand Jury Indictments Cornell tosses no-hitter, Fenton goes deep, Dragons open season with 11-0 SHAC win over Whiteoak New Verizon store opening in West Union Stephen R Palmer Dual culvert replacements for SR 73 Deana P Grooms Tim Phipps Marcella Walker Alvin R Mitchum Senior Profile: Chase Darnell SHAC hoopsters shine at District 14 All-Star Game Greyhounds run rule St. Pat, 15-0 Indians drop SHAC opener West Union hosts early JH Track Meet North Adams student wins state Beta Club President’s seat Anna B Copas Charles A Nelson Nation’s #1 movie comes to stage Artectis hosts grand opening Waiting for the ax to fall, who’s to blame? WU Seniors going to State Sci. Fair Peebles Elem. releases Honor Roll Finding the strength to endure They fought for us Born and raised “free range” Senior Profile: Jordan Crum Big Time Wrestling slams the county Associated Press names All-Ohio Teams for 2016-17 season

Cancer survivor wins Vegas trip

Manchester native, and cancer-survivor, Annissa Grooms is one of four winners of the Fabulous Four essay contest. The national contest, started two years ago to raise awareness about breast cancer and to honor four women who have dealt with a breast cancer diagnosis, is part of Bowl for the Cure, a year-round fund raising initiative sponsored by United States Bowling Congress in partnership with Susan G. Komen foundation.

The four contest winners receive a five-day trip that starts in the Dallas/Fort Worth area with a tour of the Susan G. Komen headquarters. Afterward, the group will visit the International Bowling Campus in Arlington and receive bowling lessons from the Team USA staff at the International Training and Research Center. The final stop will be Las Vegas and the 2016 Women’s Championships at the Southpoint Bowling Plaza. The group will kick off the tournament and compete as a team in the opening squad.

Receiving a cancer diagnosis is a frightening, life changing experience. The grim news often creates terrible psychological trauma that can negatively effect the healing process. It’s a jolt, and everyone adjusts differently to it.

“Cancer has given me opportunities,” Grooms declares. “I have had the chance to do things I never would have done otherwise. Because of cancer, I’ve had some really amazing opportunities. The first year I was diagnosed I did the Breast Cancer SkyDive through Fox 19, and I got to meet Tracy Johnson, who does the local segment called Think Pink. I’ve done four interviews with her so far. Now, I’ve won this contest.”

A native of Manchester, Grooms was diagnosed with stage 2A breast cancer in December of 2012. The next month she underwent a double masectomy, a biopsy that revealed the cancer had invaded her lymph nodes, and began taking chemo and radiation treatments.

“I saw an invitation on Twitter to enter this essay contest about your breast cancer story. So, I did it. I wrote about my diagnosis, my journey, and what keeps me upbeat and positive. Going to Vegas was on my bucket list, I though wow, this would be great way to go to Vegas.”

Grooms credits her good attitude to her daughter, Gracie, “I try to be positive because I have a 14- year old daughter who was 12 at the time of my diagnosis. She’s my motivation to stay positive. I want her and her friends to know cancer doesn’t have to be doom and gloom,” she adds. “A lot of it’s about having the right attitude. So, I wrote about how proud I am of her, and the fact that she is my motivation. I entered the contest, but I didn’t tell anyone, I entered and then I just put it out of my mind. I figured if it’s meant to be it will, if not, then, not, I didn’t tell Gracie, I didn’t tell my best friend, or my parents, or anyone else. I just forgot about it.”

She was very surprised when she received the call telling her that she’d won the contest.

I planned this trip to Vegas not even thinking I would win.

“I was in the drive thru of the bank and I get a call. This lady says congratulations, you’re part of the fabulous four. My daughter and I had just gone to a UK game a few days before, and I thought I might have signed up for something at the game and forgotten about it,” Grooms explains. “I thought it was a telemarketer, then she reminded me of the essay contest, once she started talking about it I was like, Oh my gosh, yeah. I do remember. She told me all the details. I went to my best friends, and told her I won, but I didn’t know if it was for real or not, and she said call back to see if it’s real. So I did and I asked, “Is this for real? Really, did I win?” and she said, “Yes, you did!” It took a day to sink in. I couldn’t believe I’d won.”

Even though she continues to undergo chemotherapy, Grooms says that her health is good, “If you look at me you wouldn’t know that I have cancer, I look healthy, and usually I feel healthy. I take an oral chemo for 21 days, then a two week break from it. I have a lot of side effects from that, but I’ve adjusted to it, to me it’s normal.”

” I’ve had a lot of really neat experiences, thanks to my breast cancer. It’s given me a completely different way of looking at things. I have a different attitude than most people who have cancer. I don’t get upset or stressed over stuff because having cancer really puts things in perspective about what’s important and what’s not. To me the most important thing is that I’m happy and my daughter is happy, and I just don’t stress over little things.

“I’ve had doors open for me, that wouldn’t have been for anyone else. I can’t be mad about it, I feel like everything happens for a reason. I just can’t be mad about it.”

Grooms has documented her cancer journey on Facebook. “I wanted to put it out there in a positive way, I leave the doom and gloom off there to show people that you can go through this and still have a smile on your face, you can be bald and still smile.”

“I’ve met so many people who have cancer who are angry. I spent a month or two feeling really bummed out about it. I decided I can’t do this, I’ve got to focus on the positive. I think you have a better chance if you have a good attitude about it.”

Following is the essay Grooms submitted to the Fabulous Four contest.:

“Diagnosed in December 2012 with Stage 2A breast cancer at the age of 40 years young. I underwent a bilateral mastectomy with reconstruction on January 2, 2013. Upon discovering cancer cells during my sentinel node biopsy, 4 rounds of chemo followed. My hair fell out one week after my first treatment, I had an allergic reaction to the chemo drugs and my body reacted with red hives, head to toe. Nothing a round of steroids couldn’t cure, so 3 more rounds, I did endure. Silicone implants replaced my tissue expanders in June 2013, and by August I got skin grafted nipples. Tamoxifen was my new daily drug. I had gained a new outlook on life, thankful and blessed…I had survived! Jumped out of an airplane to celebrate, rallied a relay for life team, had the opportunity to be on the local news not once but twice raising breast cancer awareness, and even my beautiful 12 year old daughter got inspired and donated the money from her 4-H project market hog during our county fair that year. I felt like the poster girl for Breast Cancer Awareness in our small community. I had came, I had fought, & I had kicked cancers butt! I took up running with my best friend and the following year we ran the Cincinnati Race for a Cure. Once again, we were interviewed on the Cincinnati news, an update of sorts on my progress. The fall of 2014 I fell and injured my shoulder. By the end of February the pain was unbearable and I decided I must have torn my rotator cuff in the fall. I scheduled an appointment to see an orthopedic doctor. X-rays were taken, expecting to hear the news of a torn rotator I was completely devastated when he said the word “tumor” instead. You cannot say “tumor” to a cancer survivor I informed him. He hung his head, and asked for my oncologists phone number. A bone scan & MRI were ordered and I left hysterical. The bone scan and MRI confirmed my worse fears, my breast cancer was back. It had spread to my bones. Within days I was undergoing surgery on my shoulder to remove as much tumor as possible. Indeed it was cancer. Fed by estrogen, my one remaining ovary was ordered to be removed. 2 weeks after my shoulder surgery, I was in the OR again, this time to remove my ovary and tube. By the end of March my mom, my daughter, & myself were on a plane bound for Florida for a much needed break before radiation. I was put on a new FDA approved medication, ibrance, the guine
a pig for my oncology group, ordered 10 rounds of radiation to the shoulder and T10 of my spine. When the whirlwind calmed I learned what metastatic meant. Devastated by the thought of not seeing my daughter graduate high school, college, get married, have children….This time was different from the 1st. I couldn’t kick cancers butt and declare myself the winner. Finally, I pulled myself together and vowed to quit wasting time feeling sorry for myself, and start living once again. Monthly oncology visits, infusions and medicines are my normal, but so is living each day to the fullest with my beautiful daughter. It’s funny how a year ago, I had no idea what metastatic breast cancer was, or what it meant. My mission is to educate as many people as I can about not only breast cancer, but about metastatic breast cancer. I’m hopeful that by the time my daughter is 30 (granting she doesn’t carry the CHEK2 like myself) and starts her mammograms, that there will be a cure for breast cancer, so that she never has to worry about living long enough in order to watch her daughter accomplish the goals that every mother hopes and dreams of for their children.”

Annissa Grooms participated in a Channel 19 sponsored sky diving event to raise cancer awareness.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_Grooms1.jpgAnnissa Grooms participated in a Channel 19 sponsored sky diving event to raise cancer awareness. Courtesy photo

Annissa Grooms and her daughter Gracie attend a University of Kentucky Wildcats game.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_Grooms2.jpgAnnissa Grooms and her daughter Gracie attend a University of Kentucky Wildcats game. Courtesy photo
Annissa Grooms writes winning essay

By Patricia Beech

pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at pbeech@civitasmedia.com

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