Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley North Adams hosts Youth Volleyball Camp Time to get “Stroke Savvy” OVCTC, GE host Community Service Day 65 years in the pulpit Jamison, Richmond, Minshew conquer second race of 2017 Brushcreek season Manchester’s Cox signs with Rio basketball program Senior Profile: Andrew Weeks A dozen SHAC champions Thomas D Lute Sandra F Schwab Turning something broken into something beautiful Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide One dead, two injured in ATV accident 2017 Graduation Ceremonies West Union Alumni and Friends Educational Fund announces 2017 Scholarship Awards TAG students tour Pennsylvania Commissioners proclaim Older Americans Month Building an anti-drug culture one t-shirt at a time SECTIONAL CHAMPIONS NAES students awarded Science Camp scholarships SSCC’s Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates graduation Bauman selected to National 4-H Congress Lois Pertuset Hazel Nixon Philip L Paeltz Manchester Youth Volleyball Camp begins May 30 Jase Thatcher Figgins’ walk-off winner sends North Adams to Division III sectional finals Lady Hounds top East 10-3 in sectional opener Commissioner Pell, union reps travel to DC Forgotten experience brings back good memories for WUHS seniors Gordon Boldman Local teen injured in jeep accident BCI Investigation underway Rick Arnold Happy Mother’s Day- Do you want food? Robert Hodge Melvin Tipton Lady Dragons Basketball Camp begins May 22 Lady Devils Basketball Camp is May 30-June 1 National Day of Prayer celebrated in county NAES students enjoy day at GABP Car strikes Amish buggy near Winchester Eldon J Shoenleben Farming out life lessons to children and parents Proposed Medicaid changes could cost Adams County millions Annual ‘Redneck Run” returns to Manchester May 13 They really were the best of times West Union hosts Junior High, High School County Track Meets Figgins signs with SSCC Soccer Perfect again! Senior Profile: Caley Grooms James T Hughes Anderson signs with Rio Grande Basketball Senior Profile: Miranda Schiltz Playing for Dad, Part II Lady Indians win SHAC Big School title Danny Bryant Sadie Stamm Franklin E Brayfield Softball, baseball tourney match ups announced Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall coming to Georgetown next week Southern Ohio Genealogical Society offers program on ‘Family History Sources at the Ohio History Center’ Joseph A Johnson Jr Kramer tosses two shutouts in five days Trip to Akron = two more wins for Lady Indians softball Devils blank Dragons in non-conference battle Meade twins part of Rio baseball program Playing for Dad Senior Profile: Madison Welch As Mr. Seas It, for ACOVSD High School graduates We stayed up all night with Bob Clean up of Manchester’s abandoned gas stations continues Ribbon cutting held for canoe/kayak access sites Columbus Industries donates driveway repair to Animal Shelter North Adams Elementary recognizes March Students of the Month Animal Shelter Adoption Center announces new hours of operation Major road construction planned for summer months West Union Elementary honors March Students of the Month Charles D Jordan Betty Ginn Pamela M Hampton Former county sheriff celebrates 80th birthday

Essay winners honored

Eleven Adams County students traveled to Columbus on Wednesday, Jan. 27 to be recognized by members of Ohio Senate for their award winning essays on the dangers of opiates.

The essay contest, promoted by the Adams County Sheriff’s office, asked students to discuss issues surrounding the pervasive drug problem in Ohio.

“Our government has spent millions of dollars to treat and punish those who become addicted to opiates,” Sheriff Kimmy Rogers said, but they have yet to take education and prevention seriously”

The contest winners included students from all four county schools. Peebles High School winners were eighth graders Alisan Behr, Harley Steed, and Ashton Hester. Kati Fulton, seventh grade and ninth graders Ethan Staggs and Austin Black won the honors for West Union High School. Manchester High School winners were eighth graders Madison Payne and Melanie Thatcher. The winners from North Adams included eighth grader Taylor Ogden, and ninth grade students Logan Friemoth and Andrea Danner.

The students were accompanied by Sheriff Kimmy Rogers, Deputy Micah Poe, Laura Applegate – third grade teacher at PES, Collin Flannery-Junior High Social Studies teacher at Manchester High School, Shiela Brewer-Medical Asst. PHS, bus driver Carla Wesley, and from the First State Bank of Adams County, Ryan Brewer and Corey Richmond.

“It was great seeing these students being recognized by the state Senate. It really allowed them to experience what it’s like to be rewarded for your efforts,” said Brewer.

First State Bank presented the students with Certificates of Achievement and treated everyone to lunch at the Capitol Cafe.

During their visit the students were given an extensive tour of the capitol building. They also had the opportunity to meet and talk with several state representatives and senators before they were honored on the floor of the Senate Chamber.

“This has been a very special day,”said Alison Behr, the first place winner. Behr received a $500 prize for her essay titled the Dangers of Opiates.

The following are excerpts are from Behr’s winning essay.

“Opiates come from a flower, the opium poppy, but isn’t it ironic that something so monstrous is derived by something so harmless and beautiful. Opiates are narcotics that affect the opioid receptors in the central nervous system and brain. Prolonged use can cause irreversible brain damage. This can cause the body to lose the ability to produce natural opiates called endorphins. This can cause the body to become unable to manage pain when an addict attempts to quit the opiate. People can become addicted to the feeling of emotional well-being caused by the opiates, and to the euphoria of narcotics that can numb both the emotional effects of past trauma and undiagnosed mental illnesses. Illegal opiate use comes into play when the doctors stop prescribing opiates to their patients, and patients go through a painful withdraw, and the only option they see to stop the pain is by turning to illegal opiates, and in doing so open themselves up to heroin. Every day forty-four people in the U.S. die from opiate overdoses.

Over time opiates have changed society. Now, in our society anyone can become an opiate addict. All it takes is an injury and a prescription. Friends pressuring you to try it and family offering it. It just becomes another aspect of society. Opiates should not be seen as a little blemish on society, but as what it truly is, a growing epidemic. In Peebles alone you can’t go for a run without passing an addict of some kind, especially opiates. You fear for your safety because we know that these people, these victims, are desperate for their addiction, for their drug, for their opiate. Every country, every state, every county, every town, every village, every township, and every street have an opiate abuser of a rehabilitated opiate abuser.

We choose to ignore this epidemic, jut like society has. In my homeroom class, when we were told about this essay, barely any of us knew what an opiate was. Society has changed for the worse because of opiates. Just knowing the signs and treatment for opiate abuse can help steer our society into a brighter future.

I know that a single teen cannot change the flow of society, but a single essay can cause a domino effect. If even one person is affected by this essay and they change their lives for the better, and not become another statistic, than I have completed my mission. But, that one person can affect another and so on, maybe just maybe, we can change and evolve, and stop this epidemic from destroying us altogether. Saving our society from destruction by saving the forty-four people a day and saving 16,060 people a year. It is up to the new generation to stop the use of these dangerous opiates.”

Winners of the Dangers of Opiates essay contest had the opportunity to meet with Ohio Representatives and Senators.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay1.jpgWinners of the Dangers of Opiates essay contest had the opportunity to meet with Ohio Representatives and Senators. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender

First place winner Alison Behr is presented an award by State Representative Terry Johnson.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay2.jpgFirst place winner Alison Behr is presented an award by State Representative Terry Johnson. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender

The students, teachers,and guests were given an extensive tour of the state capitol building.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay3.jpgThe students, teachers,and guests were given an extensive tour of the state capitol building. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender
Student efforts recognized by the Ohio Senate

By Patricia Beech

pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

© The People's Defender - All rights reserved