Grand Marshals selected for West Union Fourth of July Parade Adams County, Maysville Vet team up to save injured dog Michael S Knauff Victor P Price Success builds from the bottom up Finalists named for 2017 Fair Queen Contest William Glenn DeWine, Reader Call For Tips in Rhoden Murder Investigation MHS principal to take superintendent post Peebles Skate Park now a reality 2017-18 Fur and Feather Ambassadors named Caley Grooms is Cattlemen’s Beef Ambassador Dr. Mueller leaving Health Department’s free clinic Hourglass Quilt Barn returning to Adams County Lung, Thornburg are First Team All-District selections North Adams hosts annual Boys Basketball Camps Walk-off winner Wanda Hill George D Johnson Life can be a juggling act My favorite thing to do on the farm Wolves in Adams County! Ronald L Wedmore Three lessons from Dad Donald D Morgan Wenstrup uninjured in Virginia shooting Portman staff to hold grant funding workshop Raymond E Applegate Keeping the Peebles tradition alive Back on the hardwood, local hoops squads compete in Monday Night League Seven county athletes recognized as All-SHAC Baseball honorees Stepping to the podium Lady Hounds host Youth Volleyball Camp Senior Profile: Bryan Young Junior Deputy Boot Camps kick off in Manchester Hayes pleads “not guilty” to 109 counts Six-year-old girl finds long-lost class ring Jefferson Alumni awards annual scholarships Paul Tate Jr Marcus I Cox Jewell Gill James M Hill Jr Jeffrey S Jones Samuel A Disher Jack Sterling BREAKING NEWS: Parents face charges after son overdoses on opiate License Hikes and Tall Turkey Tales Danger under every rock Reigning Miss Ohio USA will judge 2017 Adams County Fair Queen Pageant Gordley’s hoops career will continue at Mount St. Joseph Russell C Newman Kenneth C Thurman George Uebel Summer Reading Program underway Honor Flight carries local veteran to DC When rescuers become victims Passing the torch, West Union hosts week-long basketball camp for future Dragons SENIOR PROFILE: Sara Knechtly Terry L Powell Willie Shreffler James C Fitzpatrick Senior Profile: Austin Parks Six countians named to All-SHAC Softball squad Lady Indians get summer camp season underway Memorial Day services pay tribute to local veterans WUHS Steel Band will perform at Bogart’s SSCC announces Honors Lists for spring semester Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for final nine weeks West Union Elementary announces Honor Roll for fourth nine weeks Back to State! Mom calls daughter “living proof” seat belts save lives Rent-2-Own donation means new soccer scoreboard at WUHS NAHS student selected for Engineering Summer Camp Southern Hills Athletic Conferences honors Spring Sports athletes Senior Profile: Kailyn Boyd Madison Welch receives Riffle Scholarship Junior Achievement Volunteers visit county’s seventh graders Marcella J Abbott James Ratliff Gladys Davitz Harry G Shupert Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley North Adams hosts Youth Volleyball Camp Time to get “Stroke Savvy”

Essay winners honored

Eleven Adams County students traveled to Columbus on Wednesday, Jan. 27 to be recognized by members of Ohio Senate for their award winning essays on the dangers of opiates.

The essay contest, promoted by the Adams County Sheriff’s office, asked students to discuss issues surrounding the pervasive drug problem in Ohio.

“Our government has spent millions of dollars to treat and punish those who become addicted to opiates,” Sheriff Kimmy Rogers said, but they have yet to take education and prevention seriously”

The contest winners included students from all four county schools. Peebles High School winners were eighth graders Alisan Behr, Harley Steed, and Ashton Hester. Kati Fulton, seventh grade and ninth graders Ethan Staggs and Austin Black won the honors for West Union High School. Manchester High School winners were eighth graders Madison Payne and Melanie Thatcher. The winners from North Adams included eighth grader Taylor Ogden, and ninth grade students Logan Friemoth and Andrea Danner.

The students were accompanied by Sheriff Kimmy Rogers, Deputy Micah Poe, Laura Applegate – third grade teacher at PES, Collin Flannery-Junior High Social Studies teacher at Manchester High School, Shiela Brewer-Medical Asst. PHS, bus driver Carla Wesley, and from the First State Bank of Adams County, Ryan Brewer and Corey Richmond.

“It was great seeing these students being recognized by the state Senate. It really allowed them to experience what it’s like to be rewarded for your efforts,” said Brewer.

First State Bank presented the students with Certificates of Achievement and treated everyone to lunch at the Capitol Cafe.

During their visit the students were given an extensive tour of the capitol building. They also had the opportunity to meet and talk with several state representatives and senators before they were honored on the floor of the Senate Chamber.

“This has been a very special day,”said Alison Behr, the first place winner. Behr received a $500 prize for her essay titled the Dangers of Opiates.

The following are excerpts are from Behr’s winning essay.

“Opiates come from a flower, the opium poppy, but isn’t it ironic that something so monstrous is derived by something so harmless and beautiful. Opiates are narcotics that affect the opioid receptors in the central nervous system and brain. Prolonged use can cause irreversible brain damage. This can cause the body to lose the ability to produce natural opiates called endorphins. This can cause the body to become unable to manage pain when an addict attempts to quit the opiate. People can become addicted to the feeling of emotional well-being caused by the opiates, and to the euphoria of narcotics that can numb both the emotional effects of past trauma and undiagnosed mental illnesses. Illegal opiate use comes into play when the doctors stop prescribing opiates to their patients, and patients go through a painful withdraw, and the only option they see to stop the pain is by turning to illegal opiates, and in doing so open themselves up to heroin. Every day forty-four people in the U.S. die from opiate overdoses.

Over time opiates have changed society. Now, in our society anyone can become an opiate addict. All it takes is an injury and a prescription. Friends pressuring you to try it and family offering it. It just becomes another aspect of society. Opiates should not be seen as a little blemish on society, but as what it truly is, a growing epidemic. In Peebles alone you can’t go for a run without passing an addict of some kind, especially opiates. You fear for your safety because we know that these people, these victims, are desperate for their addiction, for their drug, for their opiate. Every country, every state, every county, every town, every village, every township, and every street have an opiate abuser of a rehabilitated opiate abuser.

We choose to ignore this epidemic, jut like society has. In my homeroom class, when we were told about this essay, barely any of us knew what an opiate was. Society has changed for the worse because of opiates. Just knowing the signs and treatment for opiate abuse can help steer our society into a brighter future.

I know that a single teen cannot change the flow of society, but a single essay can cause a domino effect. If even one person is affected by this essay and they change their lives for the better, and not become another statistic, than I have completed my mission. But, that one person can affect another and so on, maybe just maybe, we can change and evolve, and stop this epidemic from destroying us altogether. Saving our society from destruction by saving the forty-four people a day and saving 16,060 people a year. It is up to the new generation to stop the use of these dangerous opiates.”

Winners of the Dangers of Opiates essay contest had the opportunity to meet with Ohio Representatives and Senators.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay1.jpgWinners of the Dangers of Opiates essay contest had the opportunity to meet with Ohio Representatives and Senators. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender

First place winner Alison Behr is presented an award by State Representative Terry Johnson.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay2.jpgFirst place winner Alison Behr is presented an award by State Representative Terry Johnson. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender

The students, teachers,and guests were given an extensive tour of the state capitol building.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_Essay3.jpgThe students, teachers,and guests were given an extensive tour of the state capitol building. Patricia Beech | People’s Defender
Student efforts recognized by the Ohio Senate

By Patricia Beech

pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at pbeech@civitasmedia.com

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