Thomas D Lute Sandra F Schwab Turning something broken into something beautiful Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide One dead, two injured in ATV accident 2017 Graduation Ceremonies West Union Alumni and Friends Educational Fund announces 2017 Scholarship Awards TAG students tour Pennsylvania Commissioners proclaim Older Americans Month Building an anti-drug culture one t-shirt at a time SECTIONAL CHAMPIONS NAES students awarded Science Camp scholarships SSCC’s Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates graduation Bauman selected to National 4-H Congress Lois Pertuset Hazel Nixon Philip L Paeltz Manchester Youth Volleyball Camp begins May 30 Jase Thatcher Figgins’ walk-off winner sends North Adams to Division III sectional finals Lady Hounds top East 10-3 in sectional opener Commissioner Pell, union reps travel to DC Forgotten experience brings back good memories for WUHS seniors Gordon Boldman Local teen injured in jeep accident BCI Investigation underway Rick Arnold Happy Mother’s Day- Do you want food? Robert Hodge Melvin Tipton Lady Dragons Basketball Camp begins May 22 Lady Devils Basketball Camp is May 30-June 1 National Day of Prayer celebrated in county NAES students enjoy day at GABP Car strikes Amish buggy near Winchester Eldon J Shoenleben Farming out life lessons to children and parents Proposed Medicaid changes could cost Adams County millions Annual ‘Redneck Run” returns to Manchester May 13 They really were the best of times West Union hosts Junior High, High School County Track Meets Figgins signs with SSCC Soccer Perfect again! Senior Profile: Caley Grooms James T Hughes Anderson signs with Rio Grande Basketball Senior Profile: Miranda Schiltz Playing for Dad, Part II Lady Indians win SHAC Big School title Danny Bryant Sadie Stamm Franklin E Brayfield Softball, baseball tourney match ups announced Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall coming to Georgetown next week Southern Ohio Genealogical Society offers program on ‘Family History Sources at the Ohio History Center’ Joseph A Johnson Jr Kramer tosses two shutouts in five days Trip to Akron = two more wins for Lady Indians softball Devils blank Dragons in non-conference battle Meade twins part of Rio baseball program Playing for Dad Senior Profile: Madison Welch As Mr. Seas It, for ACOVSD High School graduates We stayed up all night with Bob Clean up of Manchester’s abandoned gas stations continues Ribbon cutting held for canoe/kayak access sites Columbus Industries donates driveway repair to Animal Shelter North Adams Elementary recognizes March Students of the Month Animal Shelter Adoption Center announces new hours of operation Major road construction planned for summer months West Union Elementary honors March Students of the Month Charles D Jordan Betty Ginn Pamela M Hampton Former county sheriff celebrates 80th birthday Missing Adams County man is found Lady Hounds fall to Whiteoak in slugfest Calvert’s walk-off gives Hounds 9-8 win over Whiteoak Charles A Benjamin Give My Regards to Broadway Joyce Berry Joe L Easter William E Foster Margaret Belcher John M Cheatham Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders There will be trouble in River City! Monna L Fitzgerald Jesse Carrington Janice M Sowards Rhoden family members make plea for tips in Pike Co murders of loved ones Quilting – the art that’s no longer just for Grandma Young is Adams County recipient of Franklin B. Walter All-Scholastic Award Wenstrup recognized as Community Health Advocate Ready, set, go! 25th annual Egg Hunt draws hundreds Applicants needed for Adams County Fair Queen Humane Society encourages responsible animal ownership

Budget shortfalls force cuts

A heated exchange erupted during the Manchester Village Council Meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 2. The debate, which was centered around shortfalls in the village’s operating budget, resulted in both the town clerk and the Chief of Police announcing their intention to resign.

Manchester operates on a yearly budget of $1.2 million. The town has slowly, yet successfully been climbing out of the quagmire of a fiscal emergency when the issue of budget shortfalls arose.

The solution for dealing with this latest financial crisis is to lay off three of the four full time police officers, leaving one full time and one part time officer.

According to Mayor Troy Jolly the town is approximately $40,000 in the red. “We had unpaid invoices from 2014 totaling $17,000 and another $10,000 we never received in fines and court costs resulting from arrests made by the police department,” said Jolly. “I’m speculating that the remaining $10,000 has accumulated over a long period of time.”

The invoices that were due, but not paid in 2014, had to be paid out of the 2015 town budget. “Moving forward we have a clean slate,” Jolly explained, but the town will have to repay that money ($17,000) in 2016.”

The 2015 town budget plans for $40,000 in fines and court costs, but this year the village has received only $30,000 of that money. Balancing the budget will require collecting what is owed to the town, a task that could well prove prohibitive.

(The Defender attempted to reach members of the village council to ascertain what might account for the remaining $10-13,000 shortage, but as of press time we have received no replies.)

A proposed five year forecast (2014-2018) created by former councilmen, Cody Wagner and Brian Church in 2013, planned for a total of $19,500 in fines and court cost per year, less than half of what the current budget forecasts.

The difference in those forecasts may well be a product of a proactive police force that has been called out over 1,600 times from Jan. 1 through Dec. 1 this year.

Police Chief Jeff Bowling admits he has been aggressive when it comes to fighting crime in the village. He and his officers have managed to make a considerable dent in Manchester’s drug trade and other unlawful activities which would precipitate a rise in the number of fines and revenue.

Chief Jeff Bowling told the Defender, “I’d just like to know where the money went, and what we can do about it. This isn’t personal, I like and respect all the people I work with.”

Bowling has made the decision not to resign from his position, “I love my job, and I love working for the people in Manchester. We’ve built up this police force, and I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished.”

According to Mayor Jolly, the village clerk, Melinda Horsley did tender her resignation, and it was accepted as of Thursday, Dec. 3. Hiedi Huron will serve as interim clerk until a replacement is named. Huron currently works in Manchester’s water department. The council will discuss Horsley’s permanent replacement during their next regular meeting on Jan. 5

The members of council and the mayor all seemed to be a bit shocked by this turn of events. Jolly had praised the finance committee’s work on his Facebook page in 2013: “Since I took office in 2012 our Finance Committee has been very fiscally conservative. I trust that this will carry on into the future. This particular committee and I looked and examined the way that public money is used. I commend this Finance Committee for a job well done. We may not be out of Fiscal Emergency like we hoped, but the Auditors have been in and have promised that in the first quarter of 2014 we will be.”

Despite their diligence, they now have a current budget crisis that will require difficult and unpopular choices.

“We’re past blame, we need to fix the problem,” Jolly said, “Why weren’t the invoices paid? I don’t know, the office of the mayor doesn’t pay the bills, it’s not the mayor’s job to sign checks. We have a finance committee and the town clerk (four people) who sign the checks for the village. The bills may have come in late in 2014 resulting in their being carried over to 2015, I don’t know, but $17,000 is a lot of money to carry over from one year to the next.”

The repayment of the $40,000 in 2016 means Manchester residents will not have the same level of police protection.

“In the past four years the police department has come a long way,” Chief Bowling remarked. “We all work together well, it was disheartening to know there’s no money to support us. In a fiscal emergency we try to do our part to help. I’m not putting fault on anyone.”

The next Manchester Village Council meeting will be held on Jan. 5 in the village’s Community Building.

In the a meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 1 the Manchester Village Council was forced to make severe cuts to the town’s police force.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_council.jpgIn the a meeting on Tuesday, Dec. 1 the Manchester Village Council was forced to make severe cuts to the town’s police force. Mark Carpenter | People’s Defender
Manchester police force will be sharply reduced

By Patricia Beech

pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-779-7588 or at pbeech@civitasmedia.com

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