Jewell Foster Senior Profile: Nicholas Fish SHAC Girls Preview set for Nov. 17 Senior Profile: Lakyn Hupp Again, Lady Devils ousted in district finals ‘Lighting the Serpent’ event is being discontinued Voters favor incumbents at the ballot Arts Council dedicates Buzzardroost Rock mural Heroes in disguise Fighting for future generations in OH2 A few puffs of smoke, and a happy ending Lois Wilson Helen M Hesler Jerry L Dickson Ohio’s Traditional Deer-Gun Hunting Season begins Nov. 27 WWII veteran honored in banner raising ceremony Veteran of three wars honored for volunteer work Charlotte Evans Jason A Barr Why we celebrate Manchester man killed in single-car accident Adams County Election Results – 2017 Hubert Knauff To keep or not to keep Time again for the changing of the seasons November proclaimed as Adoption Recognition and Recruitment Month Local business is seven decades old and counting Local student gets Nashville call Senior Profile: Gabe Grooms Lady Indians fall in districts Quest For The Cup complete for Dragons Meeting a true sports hero WU’s McCarty named District Player of the Year With regional run, Pennywitt completes memorable career West Union eighth grade volleyball finishes as SHAC runner-up Senior Profile: Tray Brand Greyhounds drop home finale, finish at 4-6 Lady Devils fall in district semis Devils go down in district finals Matt Seas headed back to State XC Meet Senior Profile: Charlee Louden Lady Indians ousted in sectional final Lady Devils down Minford 4-1 in district semis North Adams volleyball claims fourth consecutive sectional crown Senior Profile: Brooklyn Howlett Afterschool fun begins at NAES Wearing it pink in October Kenneth L Austin Jay E Minnich Reuben E Hershberger Bobby L Williams 18 years just isn’t long enough Emotional, historic, and victorious Taking action against addiction Utilities commission approves DP&L electric security plan What matters and what doesn’t Oh dear, is that a deer? Junior Gaffin Charlotte J Thatcher Matthew D Miller Megan R Phillips Ralph M Swearingen Linda C Ackley Robert Ralston Shelly Seaman Increased access to treatment, Improving economic opportunity keys to combating Ohio’s Opioid Crisis Seas siblings are again SHAC Cross-Country Champions Lady Hounds cruise to sectional victory Senior Profile: Alyssa Hoskins 101 and another sectional championship Lady Indians claim sectional title North Adams tops Peebles for sectional soccer crown Senior Profile: Shay Boldman 13.5 seconds, heartbreak for West Union PHS JV Volleyball completes unbeaten season On the course that Nicklaus helped design On the ballot: Meigs Township Trustees West Union Christian Church will again be collection center for Operation Christmas Child Peebles voters will choose council members in upcoming election Seven candidates seek seats on ACOVSD school board A time for transformation What will future generations say? Finding all those treasures Janet K Campbell Robert D Hill Lady Devils blank West Union 7-0 in SHAC soccer finale Vikings invade and conquer the Greyhounds Outpouring of community support for local business woman with cancer Manchester mourns teen killed in single-car crash Kylie S Lucas Sharon R Grooms Steven L Wootten Forest J McDaniel Ralph O Grooms Adams County teenager dies in auto accident Charles N Vance Wesley M Baldwin James Kennedy Tom A Mihalovich Brand hat trick leads North Adams past West Union 5-2 in SHAC soccer action

Looking out for the interests of others

This is part four of a series about Norma who was admitted to hospice at the age of 76 with debility. Norma was excited about the prospect of sharing her life lessons with you in this series. Aaron, an LPN at the nursing home, told me. “Two or three weeks before the first one came out, Norma told me that hospice was going to put her in the paper and when I asked her why she told me, ‘I guess they think I’m an interesting character.” Boy, was that an understatement!

Norma’s gotten into my head and I can’t get her off of my mind, but why in the world would I even want to? In part one of this series Norma implanted into my mind the importance of “finishing what you start” and in part two, the folly of making promises and the wisdom of just saying, “If the Lord wills”. In part three, “Things we can learn from a dog”, I was reminded of the value of loyalty, affection, sincerity and putting people before things. But the most valuable lesson I’ve learned from Norma is the one she taught me indirectly, by observation.

When Norma’s condition declined and she needed 24-hour care, she moved from her daughter Essie’s home into a nursing home. Both Essie and Velma, Norma’s daughters, cried for the first few days. But when I asked Norma how she was doing, she replied, “I think I’m doing better than Essie. I’m adapting and I’m adjusting and I like the people here.” I told Norma that she and Thurman, another patient I had several years earlier, were at the head of the class when it comes to adapting, “co-valedictorians”.

In an attempt to glean and pass on some words of wisdom, I asked Norma for her secrets to adapting but to my surprise she couldn’t come up with any. It wasn’t until a couple weeks later that the light came on. I was talking with Norma’s daughter and son-in-law, Velma and Kermit, at Norma’s bedside. Velma shared, “There was a fellow in a wheelchair in the hallway in front of Mom’s doorway the other day and Mom got up and started walking towards him. I asked her, ‘What are you doing?,’ and she said, ‘His shoe lace is untied and I’m going to tie it for him. He’s liable to get it stuck in his wheelchair.’ But I told mom,”‘I’ll do it.’” We talked about how, in a short time, Norma had become the resident matron of the unit, about how the other residents frequented her room and she would direct them from her bedside chair. Then Kermit shared a story, “When Norma lived up by us she cut the lady’s grass who lived next door to her. She mowed it with an old 22- inch Murray push mower and she cut it just like she thought the woman would want it done.”

As I was leaving the nursing home I encountered Norma’s other daughter and son-in-law, Essie and David, in the hallway. While we were talking, another resident slowly shuffled by and said, “I want to go back to bed.” Essie said, “Hold on a minute, I need to help Rosie get back in bed.” While Essie was helping Rosie, David said, “I’m really a lucky man. Essie has such a big heart.” When Essie returned she told me, “There are three patients here that I’ve been looking out after.” Then the light came on. I realized that Essie was just like her mother and that the secret to Norma’s “adapting” and “adjusting” was that she continued to look out for the interests and needs of others. In spite of her own problems and issues, she didn’t allow herself to become self-absorbed and self-centered.

Therefore if there is any consolation in Christ, if any comfort of love, if any fellowship of the Spirit, if any affection and mercy, fulfill my joy by being like-minded, having the same love, being of one accord, of one mind. Let nothing be done through selfish ambition or conceit, but in lowliness of mind let each esteem others better than himself. Let each of you look out not only for his own interests, but also for the interests of others. (Philippians 2:1-4)

Loren Hardin is a social worker with Southern Ohio Medical Center – Hospice and can be reached by email at hardinl@somc.org or by phone at 740-356-2525.

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Loren Hardin

Straight Paths

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