Errors spell the end of Devils’ baseball season Senior Profile: Carry Hayslip Lady Hounds’ season ends with tourney loss to Paint Valley North Adams hosts Youth Volleyball Camp Time to get “Stroke Savvy” OVCTC, GE host Community Service Day 65 years in the pulpit Jamison, Richmond, Minshew conquer second race of 2017 Brushcreek season Manchester’s Cox signs with Rio basketball program Senior Profile: Andrew Weeks A dozen SHAC champions Thomas D Lute Sandra F Schwab Turning something broken into something beautiful Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide One dead, two injured in ATV accident 2017 Graduation Ceremonies West Union Alumni and Friends Educational Fund announces 2017 Scholarship Awards TAG students tour Pennsylvania Commissioners proclaim Older Americans Month Building an anti-drug culture one t-shirt at a time SECTIONAL CHAMPIONS NAES students awarded Science Camp scholarships SSCC’s Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates graduation Bauman selected to National 4-H Congress Lois Pertuset Hazel Nixon Philip L Paeltz Manchester Youth Volleyball Camp begins May 30 Jase Thatcher Figgins’ walk-off winner sends North Adams to Division III sectional finals Lady Hounds top East 10-3 in sectional opener Commissioner Pell, union reps travel to DC Forgotten experience brings back good memories for WUHS seniors Gordon Boldman Local teen injured in jeep accident BCI Investigation underway Rick Arnold Happy Mother’s Day- Do you want food? Robert Hodge Melvin Tipton Lady Dragons Basketball Camp begins May 22 Lady Devils Basketball Camp is May 30-June 1 National Day of Prayer celebrated in county NAES students enjoy day at GABP Car strikes Amish buggy near Winchester Eldon J Shoenleben Farming out life lessons to children and parents Proposed Medicaid changes could cost Adams County millions Annual ‘Redneck Run” returns to Manchester May 13 They really were the best of times West Union hosts Junior High, High School County Track Meets Figgins signs with SSCC Soccer Perfect again! Senior Profile: Caley Grooms James T Hughes Anderson signs with Rio Grande Basketball Senior Profile: Miranda Schiltz Playing for Dad, Part II Lady Indians win SHAC Big School title Danny Bryant Sadie Stamm Franklin E Brayfield Softball, baseball tourney match ups announced Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall coming to Georgetown next week Southern Ohio Genealogical Society offers program on ‘Family History Sources at the Ohio History Center’ Joseph A Johnson Jr Kramer tosses two shutouts in five days Trip to Akron = two more wins for Lady Indians softball Devils blank Dragons in non-conference battle Meade twins part of Rio baseball program Playing for Dad Senior Profile: Madison Welch As Mr. Seas It, for ACOVSD High School graduates We stayed up all night with Bob Clean up of Manchester’s abandoned gas stations continues Ribbon cutting held for canoe/kayak access sites Columbus Industries donates driveway repair to Animal Shelter North Adams Elementary recognizes March Students of the Month Animal Shelter Adoption Center announces new hours of operation Major road construction planned for summer months West Union Elementary honors March Students of the Month Charles D Jordan Betty Ginn Pamela M Hampton Former county sheriff celebrates 80th birthday Missing Adams County man is found Lady Hounds fall to Whiteoak in slugfest Calvert’s walk-off gives Hounds 9-8 win over Whiteoak Charles A Benjamin Give My Regards to Broadway Joyce Berry Joe L Easter William E Foster Margaret Belcher John M Cheatham Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders

Goat grazing is gaining ground

Want to clear out unwanted vegetation this fall without resorting to toxic means? Renting a herd of goats to graze your land may be the solution you’re looking for. Goat grazing is a natural alternative to mowing, weed-whacking, or spreading herbicides.

Goat Brush Busters, a new business located on Greenbrier Road in Seaman specializes in residential and commercial brush removal using goats.

The business is owned and operated by Shula Woodworth, a naturalized American citizen originally from England.

Woodworth was a horse trainer and riding instructor for many years until she was seriously injured and consequently disabled in a horse-related accident.

“Because I’m limited by my disability and can no longer work with horses I decided to start a business that would allow me to be self-sustaining,” said Woodworth.

Woodworth started her unique brush removal business after buying a small farm in Adams County.

She is enthusiastic about her work and her animals. “Goats are smart, friendly, and easy going animals,” she explained. “I’m physically able to do this work and it’s actually good for the environment, it makes life better for everyone.”

Goats and grazing animals have been used for centuries for land management. Farmers and landowners are rediscovering that grazing goats is often the better option for land that has unwanted plants, low organic matter, or soil compaction.

Goat grazing is a natural, quiet way to clear brush and weeds without using harmful chemicals or machines that require fossil fuel.

Managed grazing offers several benefits. Goat grazing is superior to the use of pesticides because it involves no toxic chemicals that can leach into water supplies. In addition, herbicides often impact the surrounding ecosystem, killing more than just the target weeds. Goats also consume the seeds that pesticides leave behind thereby preventing the next generation of weed growth.

Grazing is also superior to mechanized methods of weed removal. Unlike the use of mowing machines, goats are quiet and do not leave dry plant waste. In addition, they can easily clear steep slopes, uneven terrain, and maneuver around in inaccessible corners that a person would have trouble reaching.”

The goats not only get rid of the brush in a natural manner, they also have a positive impact on the land. The animals provide organic fertilizer, which helps to restore degraded earth by returning natural organisms to the soil.

Weeds are often symptomatic of unhealthy, depleted soil. Poor soil with little or no organic matter cannot sustain good growth. Goat grazing helps with this problem because everything eaten is recycled.

Goats eat the weeds, add the fertilizer, and because they are light-footed, gently aerate the soil with their soft hooves.

Over-grown gardens and other heavily weeded areas are a goat’s smorgasbord. They will happily eat aggressive noxious weeds, poison ivy, brambles, briers, and masses of prickly scrambling shrubs.

Even though goats prefer prickly thistles, being goats, they take a salad bar approach to the job and will eat whatever is available. “They have to be fenced in because they’ll eat everything,” Woodworth explains. She uses a portable electric fence to confine the goats to small grazing areas.

“They’re competitive, so if you want them to eat all the weeds they have to be concentrated into a small area. Goats would rather eat woody stems and weeds then grass, so your grass grows stronger and healthier while the weeds are destroyed.”

Goat grazing is an ecologically sound and economically viable option for many landowners. In most situations it is more cost effective than the removal fees landscapers would charge.

Ghost Brush Busters delivers goats to each client’s property and remains with them until the grazing is completed. “We have had goats on a job for as short as one day and as long as a couple of months. The amount of times it takes depends on the client’s needs and situation. No job is too large or too small.”

Anyone interested in scheduling an estimate should call 937-205-4628. The business can also be found on Facebook at Goat Brush Busters.

Goats are a natural eco-friendly alternative to herbicides.
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_Goat.jpgGoats are a natural eco-friendly alternative to herbicides.
Eco-friendly choice restores depleted land

By Patricia Beech

pbeech@civitasmedia.com

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at pbeech@civitasmedia.com

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