Betty D Cox Michael L Evans Thelma R Stamper Therese A Boerger Lady Indians go down in straight sets to Valley in sectional play Manchester hosts the inaugural Southern Ohio Cheer Challenge NAHS girls claim soccer sectional title Seas siblings are SHAC Cross-Country champions Lady Devils will collect fourth consecutive SHAC gold ball trophy Lady Hounds ousted in sectional tourney opener Peebles Lions Club holding Thanksgiving fund raiser FFA Fruit sales have begun, run until Nov. 18 Historical marker is repaired PES will present ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Eagle Creek Health and Rehabilitation Center Open House showcases new unit PES teacher honored by ACOVSD Board Friends of North Adams Library dedicate new brick Veterans Memorial Senior Profile: Landon Wright Geneva E Vogler Susan L Kremin Local golf teams complete play at state tournament Lady Dragons make school history with tournament win Browning gets hands-on look at NASA’s latest robotics Local beautician celebrates 80th birthday Health Department appeals to November voters Betty R Toller Senior Profile: Craig Horton Helen F Hoffer Super Saturday at Freedom Field Lady Dragons hang on for five-set victory over Manchester Seventh Grade Lady Hounds are SHAC Tournament champions Peebles Elementary announces September Students of the Month Rideout’s Muffler celebrating 40th anniversary this month Senior Citizens levy will appear on November ballot Bonnie J Orr Dorothy M Edenfield Senior Profile: Grace Barge Jerry Paquette Dragons get big 38-20 win at Green Manchester takes varsity team titles at West Union Invitational Lady Devils knock off Peebles on Volley For the Cure Night Manhunt ends with arrest of alleged bank robber Senior Profile: Kelsey Friend Lady Dragons finish as District Runners-Up Sectional pairings announced for volleyball and soccer 2 and 3 and worried is me Patricia Clift Adams County Humane Agent saves abandoned dogs and puppies Tourism had major economic impact on Adams County in 2015 Senator Portman brings his campaign to Adams County Betty E Lawson Sanborn NAHS holds National Honor Society induction ceremonies Harlan W Benjamin Joyce A Lafferty Senior Profile: Lee Hesler Dragons get SHAC win, 2-1 over Fairfield North Adams tops Peebles in ‘Kickin Cancer’ battles Double duty coming at Boys’ State Golf Tournament as West Union and North Adams both qualify Humane Society providing ‘Straws For Paws’ North Adams Elementary honors students and staff Russell Rockwell Julie L Wagner Hobert C Robinson Samuel D McClellan Brenda S Bare Clarencce Walker Jr Dolly M Hilterbrandt Jack Roush Day returns to Manchester West Union FFA has busy opening to school year ODOT opens new full-service Maintenance Facility Peebles Elementary introduces Peer Mentoring program Frost is recipient of Morgan Memorial Scholarship Peebles Fire Department has a new addition Heritage Days return to Tranquility Wheat Ridge Olde Thyme Herb Fair and Harvest Festival begins Friday Caraway Farm hosts annual Pumpkin Festival ‘Run Gio’ makes a visit to Adams County Senior Profile: Mackenzie Smith West Union, North Adams grab top two spots in Division III golf sectional tournament This memory will live with me forever Will M Stern West Union and North Adams-State Bound! Lillian N Smith Betty R Shelton Barbara ER Bohl Brenda Farley Senior Profile: Caitlyn Bradford Dragons roar to 40-0 Homecoming victory Greyhounds take three of four races at annual Adams County Meet Monarch Meadows holds grand opening Discovering a touch of glass on Erie’s Shores Junior L Conaway William B Brumley Sr Fred G Davis Ohio Valley FFA Officers for 2016-17 named ACRMC Emergency Care Center renamed after Dr. Bruce Ashley West Union holds football Homecoming festivities First graders pick the Sheriff Cross honored by ODNR with the prestigious Cardinal Award Renowned Ohio artist visits WUHS

Goat grazing is gaining ground

Want to clear out unwanted vegetation this fall without resorting to toxic means? Renting a herd of goats to graze your land may be the solution you’re looking for. Goat grazing is a natural alternative to mowing, weed-whacking, or spreading herbicides.

Goat Brush Busters, a new business located on Greenbrier Road in Seaman specializes in residential and commercial brush removal using goats.

The business is owned and operated by Shula Woodworth, a naturalized American citizen originally from England.

Woodworth was a horse trainer and riding instructor for many years until she was seriously injured and consequently disabled in a horse-related accident.

“Because I’m limited by my disability and can no longer work with horses I decided to start a business that would allow me to be self-sustaining,” said Woodworth.

Woodworth started her unique brush removal business after buying a small farm in Adams County.

She is enthusiastic about her work and her animals. “Goats are smart, friendly, and easy going animals,” she explained. “I’m physically able to do this work and it’s actually good for the environment, it makes life better for everyone.”

Goats and grazing animals have been used for centuries for land management. Farmers and landowners are rediscovering that grazing goats is often the better option for land that has unwanted plants, low organic matter, or soil compaction.

Goat grazing is a natural, quiet way to clear brush and weeds without using harmful chemicals or machines that require fossil fuel.

Managed grazing offers several benefits. Goat grazing is superior to the use of pesticides because it involves no toxic chemicals that can leach into water supplies. In addition, herbicides often impact the surrounding ecosystem, killing more than just the target weeds. Goats also consume the seeds that pesticides leave behind thereby preventing the next generation of weed growth.

Grazing is also superior to mechanized methods of weed removal. Unlike the use of mowing machines, goats are quiet and do not leave dry plant waste. In addition, they can easily clear steep slopes, uneven terrain, and maneuver around in inaccessible corners that a person would have trouble reaching.”

The goats not only get rid of the brush in a natural manner, they also have a positive impact on the land. The animals provide organic fertilizer, which helps to restore degraded earth by returning natural organisms to the soil.

Weeds are often symptomatic of unhealthy, depleted soil. Poor soil with little or no organic matter cannot sustain good growth. Goat grazing helps with this problem because everything eaten is recycled.

Goats eat the weeds, add the fertilizer, and because they are light-footed, gently aerate the soil with their soft hooves.

Over-grown gardens and other heavily weeded areas are a goat’s smorgasbord. They will happily eat aggressive noxious weeds, poison ivy, brambles, briers, and masses of prickly scrambling shrubs.

Even though goats prefer prickly thistles, being goats, they take a salad bar approach to the job and will eat whatever is available. “They have to be fenced in because they’ll eat everything,” Woodworth explains. She uses a portable electric fence to confine the goats to small grazing areas.

“They’re competitive, so if you want them to eat all the weeds they have to be concentrated into a small area. Goats would rather eat woody stems and weeds then grass, so your grass grows stronger and healthier while the weeds are destroyed.”

Goat grazing is an ecologically sound and economically viable option for many landowners. In most situations it is more cost effective than the removal fees landscapers would charge.

Ghost Brush Busters delivers goats to each client’s property and remains with them until the grazing is completed. “We have had goats on a job for as short as one day and as long as a couple of months. The amount of times it takes depends on the client’s needs and situation. No job is too large or too small.”

Anyone interested in scheduling an estimate should call 937-205-4628. The business can also be found on Facebook at Goat Brush Busters.

Goats are a natural eco-friendly alternative to herbicides. are a natural eco-friendly alternative to herbicides.
Eco-friendly choice restores depleted land

By Patricia Beech

Reach Patricia Beech at 937-544-2391 or at

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