Janice McGlothin Jeannine O Evans Gerald Grooms Marvin Setty Richard G Waldron Grand Marshals selected for West Union Fourth of July Parade Adams County, Maysville Vet team up to save injured dog Michael S Knauff Victor P Price Success builds from the bottom up Finalists named for 2017 Fair Queen Contest William Glenn DeWine, Reader Call For Tips in Rhoden Murder Investigation MHS principal to take superintendent post Peebles Skate Park now a reality 2017-18 Fur and Feather Ambassadors named Caley Grooms is Cattlemen’s Beef Ambassador Dr. Mueller leaving Health Department’s free clinic Hourglass Quilt Barn returning to Adams County Lung, Thornburg are First Team All-District selections North Adams hosts annual Boys Basketball Camps Walk-off winner Wanda Hill George D Johnson Life can be a juggling act My favorite thing to do on the farm Wolves in Adams County! Ronald L Wedmore Three lessons from Dad Donald D Morgan Wenstrup uninjured in Virginia shooting Portman staff to hold grant funding workshop Raymond E Applegate Keeping the Peebles tradition alive Back on the hardwood, local hoops squads compete in Monday Night League Seven county athletes recognized as All-SHAC Baseball honorees Stepping to the podium Lady Hounds host Youth Volleyball Camp Senior Profile: Bryan Young Junior Deputy Boot Camps kick off in Manchester Hayes pleads “not guilty” to 109 counts Six-year-old girl finds long-lost class ring Jefferson Alumni awards annual scholarships Paul Tate Jr Marcus I Cox Jewell Gill James M Hill Jr Jeffrey S Jones Samuel A Disher Jack Sterling BREAKING NEWS: Parents face charges after son overdoses on opiate License Hikes and Tall Turkey Tales Danger under every rock Reigning Miss Ohio USA will judge 2017 Adams County Fair Queen Pageant Gordley’s hoops career will continue at Mount St. Joseph Russell C Newman Kenneth C Thurman George Uebel Summer Reading Program underway Honor Flight carries local veteran to DC When rescuers become victims Passing the torch, West Union hosts week-long basketball camp for future Dragons SENIOR PROFILE: Sara Knechtly Terry L Powell Willie Shreffler James C Fitzpatrick Senior Profile: Austin Parks Six countians named to All-SHAC Softball squad Lady Indians get summer camp season underway Memorial Day services pay tribute to local veterans WUHS Steel Band will perform at Bogart’s SSCC announces Honors Lists for spring semester Peebles Elementary releases Honor Roll for final nine weeks West Union Elementary announces Honor Roll for fourth nine weeks Back to State! Mom calls daughter “living proof” seat belts save lives Rent-2-Own donation means new soccer scoreboard at WUHS NAHS student selected for Engineering Summer Camp Southern Hills Athletic Conferences honors Spring Sports athletes Senior Profile: Kailyn Boyd Madison Welch receives Riffle Scholarship Junior Achievement Volunteers visit county’s seventh graders Marcella J Abbott James Ratliff Gladys Davitz Harry G Shupert Memories on Memorial Day A soldier’s story, a family’s grief Thank You for your sacrifice Seaman community honors local veterans with special tribute Former PES teacher dies in tragic accident All County Senior Citizens Day celebrated Parks signs with SSCC Soccer Senior Profile: Lexie Bunn Jessie Rodgers Memorial Day services set for county Truly our greatest generation Bertha Lashley Maia Swartz Jessie Rodgers

August in the garden

Can it really be August? The high temperatures are drying out the herbs planted in containers on the deck and the pallet garden could almost take a drink twice a day. We have been eating tomatoes for lunch and dinner along with our favorite cucumber and onion salad. Before long we will be harvesting enough that I can start canning chili sauce.

Did you know that temperature plays a very important part in the ripening process? Lycopene, the pigment that gives ripe tomatoes their red color, is only produced at ambient temperatures of between 50 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. The optimum temperature for lycopene production is 68-77 degrees Fahrenheit. Any great deviation from these temperature ranges will mean that tomatoes won’t turn red. Sometimes when it gets quite hot, tomatoes on the vine may have a yellowish orange look. If practical for the size of your operations, it might be better to pick them in the pink stage and let them ripen indoors in cooler temperatures. Tomatoes need warmth, not light, to ripen, so there’s no need to put them in direct sunlight. Place them out of direct sunlight where the temperature is 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit.

As I walk around my garden with my Tomato “map”, yes, I have to make a map so that when my husband asks, “What tomato is this?” I can give him a quick answer. Early in the ripening process I sometimes take a marker to the garden with me and put the number on the tomatoes as I harvest. I planted 25 different varieties of tomatoes this year, so I need all the help I can get when it comes to tomato identification.

Your Gardening Checklist for August includes:

1. Water and weed

2. Fertilize annuals, especially those in containers. Remove spent annuals and replace with new plants to keep beds and containers fresh.

3. Divide irises and daylilies as they complete blooming.

4. Divide and transplant peonies.

5. Cut back yarrow, catmint, coreopsis and veronica by one-third when plants stop flowering to encourage new foliage and blooms.

6. Harvest herbs for freezing or drying.

7. Re-edge beds.

8. Keep compost moist.

9. Do a final planting of vegetables for fall harvest: spinach, lettuce, kale and chard. (Don’t forget to water frequently.)

10. Check plants for signs of pests and diseases.

11. Evaluate your garden with an eye for improvements.

12. Collect seeds for next year’s garden.

13. Study bulb catalogs and order garlic and flowering bulbs to plant this fall.

14. Add extra fall-blooming perennials to the garden

15. Cut flowers to bring indoors to enjoy.

16. Direct-seed turnips for a fall harvest

17. Propagate strawberries or weed them and thin out runners.

Remember that a gardener can help prevent problems with pests and disease. Handling plants carefully, not working among the plants when they are wet, and routinely cleaning your tools can help a great deal. Encouraging populations of beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps and spiders is a great way to control Insect pests. Routinely inspect plants every other day or so during the height of the season to catch problems before they get out of hand. My biggest problem still seems to be the wildlife this year. Happily they decided to leave me the late blooming daylilies to enjoy.

The accelerated gardening season continues to amaze me this year. Last year my Magic lilies were finished blooming by Aug. 25, but this year they started blooming on July 28. The Resurrection Lily is a member of the Amaryllis Family, which includes other well-known bulbs such as common amaryllis, daylilies, daffodils, and snowdrops. These lilies are easy to grow and naturalize readily. Magic lilies have strap-like leaves that emerge in spring and die down by mid-summer. No leaves are present during summer months or when the blooms arise (hence the name Naked Lady or Magic Lily). These lilies make excellent cut flowers as well as beautiful garden plants.

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

Have you counted the jars on your canning shelf? Are you running short on some of your favorites? It’s time to make your list for this year! The Mahaffey’s list includes: Bread and Butter Pickles, Chili Sauce, Tomato juice and Pepper Relish.

The magic lily
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_AugustGarden.jpgThe magic lily

By Faye Mahaffey

OSUE Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer

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