Wenstrup announces re-election campaign Delta Dental provides two local schools with new drinking fountains Ernie McFarland honored by Ohio Bankers League Veterans Day parade, ceremony held in West Union Adams County schools celebrate Veterans Day Being the change November: As Mr. Seas it Protecting Ohio seniors from rising healthcare costs It’s November-have some soup and pie SHAC Boys Preview is Nov. 24 at Peebles June Hall Alice B Himes Claudia U Mitchell TRAFFIC ALERT: SR 41 restrictions set for Saturday Jewell Foster Senior Profile: Nicholas Fish SHAC Girls Preview set for Nov. 17 Senior Profile: Lakyn Hupp Again, Lady Devils ousted in district finals ‘Lighting the Serpent’ event is being discontinued Voters favor incumbents at the ballot Arts Council dedicates Buzzardroost Rock mural Heroes in disguise Fighting for future generations in OH2 A few puffs of smoke, and a happy ending Lois Wilson Helen M Hesler Jerry L Dickson Ohio’s Traditional Deer-Gun Hunting Season begins Nov. 27 WWII veteran honored in banner raising ceremony Veteran of three wars honored for volunteer work Charlotte Evans Jason A Barr Why we celebrate Manchester man killed in single-car accident Adams County Election Results – 2017 Hubert Knauff To keep or not to keep Time again for the changing of the seasons November proclaimed as Adoption Recognition and Recruitment Month Local business is seven decades old and counting Local student gets Nashville call Senior Profile: Gabe Grooms Lady Indians fall in districts Quest For The Cup complete for Dragons Meeting a true sports hero WU’s McCarty named District Player of the Year With regional run, Pennywitt completes memorable career West Union eighth grade volleyball finishes as SHAC runner-up Senior Profile: Tray Brand Greyhounds drop home finale, finish at 4-6 Lady Devils fall in district semis Devils go down in district finals Matt Seas headed back to State XC Meet Senior Profile: Charlee Louden Lady Indians ousted in sectional final Lady Devils down Minford 4-1 in district semis North Adams volleyball claims fourth consecutive sectional crown Senior Profile: Brooklyn Howlett Afterschool fun begins at NAES Wearing it pink in October Kenneth L Austin Jay E Minnich Reuben E Hershberger Bobby L Williams 18 years just isn’t long enough Emotional, historic, and victorious Taking action against addiction Utilities commission approves DP&L electric security plan What matters and what doesn’t Oh dear, is that a deer? Junior Gaffin Charlotte J Thatcher Matthew D Miller Megan R Phillips Ralph M Swearingen Linda C Ackley Robert Ralston Shelly Seaman Increased access to treatment, Improving economic opportunity keys to combating Ohio’s Opioid Crisis Seas siblings are again SHAC Cross-Country Champions Lady Hounds cruise to sectional victory Senior Profile: Alyssa Hoskins 101 and another sectional championship Lady Indians claim sectional title North Adams tops Peebles for sectional soccer crown Senior Profile: Shay Boldman 13.5 seconds, heartbreak for West Union PHS JV Volleyball completes unbeaten season On the course that Nicklaus helped design On the ballot: Meigs Township Trustees West Union Christian Church will again be collection center for Operation Christmas Child Peebles voters will choose council members in upcoming election Seven candidates seek seats on ACOVSD school board A time for transformation What will future generations say? Finding all those treasures Janet K Campbell Robert D Hill Lady Devils blank West Union 7-0 in SHAC soccer finale

August in the garden

Can it really be August? The high temperatures are drying out the herbs planted in containers on the deck and the pallet garden could almost take a drink twice a day. We have been eating tomatoes for lunch and dinner along with our favorite cucumber and onion salad. Before long we will be harvesting enough that I can start canning chili sauce.

Did you know that temperature plays a very important part in the ripening process? Lycopene, the pigment that gives ripe tomatoes their red color, is only produced at ambient temperatures of between 50 and 85 degrees Fahrenheit. The optimum temperature for lycopene production is 68-77 degrees Fahrenheit. Any great deviation from these temperature ranges will mean that tomatoes won’t turn red. Sometimes when it gets quite hot, tomatoes on the vine may have a yellowish orange look. If practical for the size of your operations, it might be better to pick them in the pink stage and let them ripen indoors in cooler temperatures. Tomatoes need warmth, not light, to ripen, so there’s no need to put them in direct sunlight. Place them out of direct sunlight where the temperature is 65-70 degrees Fahrenheit.

As I walk around my garden with my Tomato “map”, yes, I have to make a map so that when my husband asks, “What tomato is this?” I can give him a quick answer. Early in the ripening process I sometimes take a marker to the garden with me and put the number on the tomatoes as I harvest. I planted 25 different varieties of tomatoes this year, so I need all the help I can get when it comes to tomato identification.

Your Gardening Checklist for August includes:

1. Water and weed

2. Fertilize annuals, especially those in containers. Remove spent annuals and replace with new plants to keep beds and containers fresh.

3. Divide irises and daylilies as they complete blooming.

4. Divide and transplant peonies.

5. Cut back yarrow, catmint, coreopsis and veronica by one-third when plants stop flowering to encourage new foliage and blooms.

6. Harvest herbs for freezing or drying.

7. Re-edge beds.

8. Keep compost moist.

9. Do a final planting of vegetables for fall harvest: spinach, lettuce, kale and chard. (Don’t forget to water frequently.)

10. Check plants for signs of pests and diseases.

11. Evaluate your garden with an eye for improvements.

12. Collect seeds for next year’s garden.

13. Study bulb catalogs and order garlic and flowering bulbs to plant this fall.

14. Add extra fall-blooming perennials to the garden

15. Cut flowers to bring indoors to enjoy.

16. Direct-seed turnips for a fall harvest

17. Propagate strawberries or weed them and thin out runners.

Remember that a gardener can help prevent problems with pests and disease. Handling plants carefully, not working among the plants when they are wet, and routinely cleaning your tools can help a great deal. Encouraging populations of beneficial insects such as parasitic wasps and spiders is a great way to control Insect pests. Routinely inspect plants every other day or so during the height of the season to catch problems before they get out of hand. My biggest problem still seems to be the wildlife this year. Happily they decided to leave me the late blooming daylilies to enjoy.

The accelerated gardening season continues to amaze me this year. Last year my Magic lilies were finished blooming by Aug. 25, but this year they started blooming on July 28. The Resurrection Lily is a member of the Amaryllis Family, which includes other well-known bulbs such as common amaryllis, daylilies, daffodils, and snowdrops. These lilies are easy to grow and naturalize readily. Magic lilies have strap-like leaves that emerge in spring and die down by mid-summer. No leaves are present during summer months or when the blooms arise (hence the name Naked Lady or Magic Lily). These lilies make excellent cut flowers as well as beautiful garden plants.

Don’t forget to email your gardening questions to Mike Hannah at mhannah2@msn.com.

Have you counted the jars on your canning shelf? Are you running short on some of your favorites? It’s time to make your list for this year! The Mahaffey’s list includes: Bread and Butter Pickles, Chili Sauce, Tomato juice and Pepper Relish.

The magic lily
http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_AugustGarden.jpgThe magic lily

By Faye Mahaffey

OSUE Brown County Master Gardener Volunteer

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