Manchester grad enjoys a “Super” Experience Taking Adams County patriotism to the state capitol John P Sininger Jo Ann Hayslip Harvey U Schrock Eunice G. Burgess Senior Profile: Kaulen St Michael Cox Racing returns to Brushcreek on April 2 Southern Hills Athletic Conference holds Winter Sports Awards ceremony Adams County provides multiple walking venues Adams County parks are tobacco-free Rhoads Memorial 5K Run/Walk is April 9 Peebles Elem. Staff of the Month Floyd E Maddy Raymond A Holt Derrick Poe Spencer E McFarland Mintie F Rogers Roberta Eylar Big Time Wrestling coming to NAHS Carl Tomlin CTC students help with storm clean-up Opening the door for high-tech jobs Jack R Slyger Thomas Stratton Jr Eastern Lady Warriors headed to Final Four Senior Profile: Logan Rogers Southern Hills Athletic Conference names 2016-17 All-Conference Basketball Teams Winchester PD continues assault on drugs Alonso joins Defender staff Sheriff to set up outpost in Manchester Johnson named OEDA Membership Chairperson Sherman E Young Ruth Jackman ‘Kitten Season’ comes to Ohio Manchester Council votes to disband PD Olde Wayside Inn under new management Two overdose on heroin Senior Profile: Ethan Parrett Adams/Brown Youth League holds postseason tourney Three nights of pain Furious rally falls short, Lady Devils again eliminated in Div. III district finals, 45-42 Oscar Moore Barbara J Finnegan Ohio Senate and House honor Miss Ohio USA Michael Eldridge Frances Towner Thelma R Williamson BREAKING NEWS: Manchester council votes to eliminate police department Before all dogs go to heaven Adaptive Bikes delivered in Adams County Adams County Junior Fair Market Hog Identification plans announced for 2017 Local couple takes ownership of two local businesses Jo Hanson to retire after nearly 50 years in banking Sierra Club, hero or villain? Greyhounds, Devils are runners-up in SHAC Tournaments Harold L Purdin Senior Profile: Jacob Wickerham 98-year old author publishes first book Early March storm packs destructive punch Jeeps rally in second half to end the Peebles season How about some post season awards? Thanks for all the great sports coverage PHS Principal hopes to expand students’ world view When spring becomes a promise Greg Lorenz Clay shoots the lights out, shoots down Greyhounds’ season Senior Profile: Savannah McFarland Devils put up a good fight, but fall to Portsmouth in sectional final, 50-43 Second half comeback sends Lady Devils to district finals for third straight year Butts honored by Southeast District Athletic Board North Adams Elementary holds Random Acts of Kindness Week Chester W Eyre BREAKING NEWS: March makes its entrance with force WUES kicks off Right to Read Week with guest readers WUHS students see Aronoff show on the life of Edgar Allan Poe Local high school seniors winners of Wendy’s Heisman Awards The emotions of a senior year Market Hog Clinic scheduled for March 4 Venture Hawks fall to Scioto County Senior Profile : Colton Thornburg Lady Dragons’ season ends with sectional loss to Lynchburg Devils advance in tourney with convincing win over West Union, will face Portsmouth for sectional title Wenstrup selected as Vice Chairman of House Armed Services Military Personnel Subcommittee Adams County 4-H Shooting Sports to hold fund raiser Linda M Howland Nellie B Hayslip Russell E Bailey Gladys M Perdue Commissioners meet in Columbus with DP&L CEO Tom Raga Missing the Dirtrollers The farms that aren’t forgotten Flora Hilderbran Commissioners to meet with DP&L officials New state graduation requirements called a ‘train wreck’ Catching up with Keller Senior Profile: Justin Knechtly Piketon size is too much for Lady Indians, Peebles falls in sectional finals Greyhounds grab Senior Night win Indians finish regular season riding six-game winning streak

Sliding into fun

On summer nights when it is muggy and warm I think of being entertained in a great and extra ordinary way by my cousins Tom and Lydia. During the years of growing up and on into adulthood my summers almost certainly drift back to my cousins who lived in Pleasant Ridge in the winter. Their entire family would move to their farm for the summers. This was special in the fact that their oldest child Walt was my age and it gave me a playmate for three months or a little more. My neighborhood was scarce on kids to play with so this was a big bonus for me.

Tom and Lydia were what a perfect host and hostess were to be. They loved people and loved to have you in their home and spoil you with hospitality. Lydia was the most gracious lady I think I ever have known and there wasn’t a thing she could prepare to eat that wasn’t mouth melting awesome and there was always lots of it and we were encouraged to have more. You could eat way too much and she convinced you that you hadn’t eaten enough. Tom’s role was the entertainment. This he loved to do and he was great at and unique every time in how you were entertained.

The biggest memory and maybe the dearest I have was “slide show night.” Tom was a shutter bug who took pictures constantly, either by movie or Polaroid. His favorite weapon to capture us in pictures was a 35 mm camera that when the film was developed was made into slides to use in a projector and show on a screen.

When he would accumulate three to four rolls Tom would announce that on a certain night there would be a slide show. From what I can recall those in attendance were my Aunt Margaret and Uncle Charles and family, my sister Peg, Tom’s Dad my Great Uncle Roy and along with Tom’s family there was also yours truly. No way would I miss one of these.

When it got dark enough we all assembled in their very large living room with more than 20 as a low number in attendance. Tom manned the projector and began the show with a large drum roll like the beginning of an MGM movie. With the first slide and all the rest the fun only increased as each picture was open for comment, wise cracks, and what were thought to be funny remarks. All was taken in good natured fun for the most part. Part of the way through the show Tom would put someone else in charge of the projector and go to the piano. He played piano by ear and was very good. So he would start up with music to accompany each picture. All the comments and music of whatever kind crossed his whimsy revved the crowd into slide show riot like I’ve never seen anywhere else.

After more than an hour of just plain fun the crowd would dismiss to their closed in porch for the next part of the evening. Tom would set up the ice cream maker and Lydia would bring out what we all knew was coming. Here came the homemade ice cream mix for which Lydia always kept the recipe secret. It was so rich with cream that the vanilla ice cream was yellow. To my knowledge Tom was the first person I knew of to buy an electric machine, which meant no more taking turns cranking so it made the ice cream quicker. (This was modern progress at its best). When the mixture had been cranked until the contents of the canister became solid, Lydia brought from the kitchen metal mugs that were enamel baked and painted harvest gold with a brown design on its side that I don’t recall now. As a mug was filled with soft serve ice cream and a spoon, it was passed on until all there had an ample serving of what to this day I feel was the greatest food that has ever entered my mouth.

While we consumed this treasure the crowd would pair off into smaller groups and discuss topics of their interests. This would end between 11 p.m. and midnight and we all knew the wonderful evening must come to an end. I think what helped us disperse was that Tom would take more pictures and in a month or two we would get to do this again.

On a hot summer night when you were surrounded with family and friends and in the home of quite possibly the greatest couple to ever open their doors to guests, you could laugh and smile and be care free for a while with your troubles put on the back burner. After Sharon and I married she became a part of the crowd and has reminded me of just how much fun there was to be had. This all thanks to the hosts, as a good time comes easier when the fun was not only allowed, but encouraged. At this moment I can’t think of a time or place that was better. Neither would you if you had been invited.

Rick Houser grew up on a farm near Moscow in Clermont County and likes to share stories about his youth and other topics. He may be reached at houser734@yahoo.com.

http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_RickHouser3.jpg

Rick Houser

The Good Old Days

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2016 People's Defender