Flora Hilderbran Commissioners to meet with DP&L officials New state graduation requirements called a ‘train wreck’ Catching up with Keller Senior Profile: Justin Knechtly Piketon size is too much for Lady Indians, Peebles falls in sectional finals Greyhounds grab Senior Night win Indians finish regular season riding six-game winning streak Harper, Hupp, Defense lead Lady Devils to fourth consecutive sectional championship West Union Elementary recognizes Students of the Month for January Second Healthy Hero awarded by Adams County Health and Wellness Coalition Coal company files to intervene in power plant closings Senior Profile: Jessica Sowards Senior Profile: Dennis Welch Dorothy E Walls Mabel Chamblin Michael R Jones Marie I Simmons Ray Johnson One thing to remember this President’s Day Adams County Deer Harvest down over 21% MLSD amends five-year budget, prepares for future with power plant closings Lady Dragons triumph in sectional opener Lady Hounds eighth graders capture SHAC Tournament title Gary L Fetters Sr Boys Sectional brackets released ‘We’re only as good as the way we treat others’ Another round of smiles Adams County Board of DD members recognized Terry L Unger 8th Grade Lady Devils ousted in tourney semis WU’s McCarty signs with Ohio Christian Joyce A Huddleson Carolyn Spires BREAKING NEWS: Peebles police search for man accused of selling marijuana-laced sweets Decision Time BBN Senior Profile: Summer Grundy Lady Devils fall to Southeastern, 56-48 Devils outlast Manchester 47-44 in double overtime Peebles holds second Hall of Fame Ceremony Senior Profile: Patrick England Sowards hits 1,000, ties PHS three-point mark County agencies prepare for sweeping budget cuts Manchester Council votes to cut police chief’s hours Wrestling debuts in Adams County Peebles Library hosts book signing As plants power down, community must step up Raymond P Dryden Alva Palmer Billie L Shoemaker Judith Long Brent A Arn Girls basketball sectional pairings announced WU’s Weeks will continue gridiron career at next level West Union JH Boys drop pair at Ripley Eighth Grade Lady Hounds roll into SHAC semi-finals Janet A Kennedy DP&L moving ahead with plans to close power plants Outreach Center in Peebles is a hub of giving River Sweep contest winners announced Gordley hits 1,000 mark, but Indians drop crucial SHAC contest to Lynchburg Manchester lifters compete at Piketon Senior Profile: Madelyn Sanders Charles L Hurd Randy Casto Bobby Strunk Dorothy J Scott Chester A Lanter Coach David Smalley picks up 500th career win at Rio Grande Dustin Holbrook Senior Profile: Camron Gordley As usual, optimism abounds on 2017 Reds Caravan Breeze, Beasley newest members of NAHS Athletic HOF Two humble men Adams County Manor Home Health Care makes road to recovery easier Don and Venita Bowles named as Outstanding Fair Supporters ‘Tip off For Tammy’ is a huge success, joint effort by two schools Husted campaign makes stop in Peebles Benefit held for double-lung transplant recipient I loved that muddy water, building in the creek Margaret E Broughton Larry A Hanson DP&L press release confirms closing of power plants Eighth grade girls showdown lives up to hype, North Adams wins in overtime, 45-43 Senior Profile: Raeanna Stamm North Adams Football sign-ups coming soon North Adams JV girls go 11-4 with win over Peebles Harper wins MaxPreps/JJHuddle Athlete of the Week West Union duo headed to the college gridiron Lady Devils make it 11 straight with win at Peebles Adams County residents attend Trump Inauguration A Look back at our Archives Peebles native comes home to film documentary Ohio Valley Wrestling Cub hosting home match on Jan. 31 Ruth A Branscome Velma Hughes Carol L Lewis Betty L Greiner Devils top New Boston 63-53 in finale of Coach Young Classic Lady Devils rout Eastern Pike in Young Classic

Maidenhair Tree is a living fossil

Few nursery trees have as interesting a story as the Gingko. One reason is that Ginko trees are living fossils, dating back to the Early Jurassic period over 270 million years ago, surviving to the present day very much unchanged. Very few life forms can make that claim. Ginkgo was once widespread throughout the world, but by two million years ago they were only found in small area of China. That’s still the only place they grow wild, but Gingko has become a very popular landscape tree all over the world.

Gingko leaves are unique among seed plants, fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade. Two veins begin at the base and fork repeatedly but never branch out the way other tree leaves do. The common name “maidenhair tree” is because the leaves resemble the maidenhair fern. They turn bright lemon yellow before dropping in fall.

Some Ginkgo trees are female and others male. Female plants produce light yellow-brown, soft, fruit-like seeds known for their unpleasant smell, like rancid butter or vomit. This is why good nurseries only sell male Gingko trees. Although Gingko are easy to propagate from seed, nursery-grown ginkgo trees are male cuttings grafted onto plants grown from seed, because the male trees will not produce smelly seeds.

Like ferns, algae and mosses but unlike most trees, Gingkos fertilize their seeds using sperm, which are actually able to move about using flagella which have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards, propelling it to the female sex organs inside the tree’s flower.

Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching 80-100 feet, with some specimens in China being over 164 feet. They are usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.

Ginkgo is native to China; where there are examples believed to be over 1,500 years old. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism, the ginkgo is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; over the centuries it has become established in forests there. The ginkgo leaf is the symbol of the Urasenke school of Japanese tea ceremony. Ginkgos are popular subjects for bonsai; they can be kept artificially small and tended over centuries.

Ginkgos have lasted since prehistory because they are tough survivors, tolerating pollution and confined soil spaces. They rarely suffer disease problems, even in city conditions, and are attacked by few insects. An extreme example of their hardiness is that in Hiroshima, Japan, where six trees growing less than a mile from the 1945 atom bomb explosion were among the few living things in the area to survive the blast. While almost all other plants (and animals) in the area were destroyed, the Ginkgos survived and are still alive today.

Their nut-like seed kernels are a traditional Chinese food, served at special occasions such as weddings and the Chinese New Year. In Chinese culture, they are believed to have health benefits; some also consider them to have aphrodisiac qualities. Japanese cooks add ginkgo seeds to some traditional dishes, or serve them as a garnish. Extracts of ginkgo leaves are believed to have healthful and curative properties. According to some studies, ginkgo can significantly improve attention in healthy individuals. Many studies have indicated other health benefits.

I first saw Gingko trees growing in an oil refinery, where they thrived despite noxious fumes and poor soil. Since that time we’ve planted dozens of them, and never had one fail. We recommend them as memorial trees because of their ruggedness, their timeless quality and their connection to the earliest forms of life on earth. We believe that a tree with the ability to survive hundreds, even thousands of years, is the perfect choice for a living memorial.

Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_Leaf.jpg

Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Nursery & Landscape, located near Winchester, Ohio at 9736 Tri-County Highway. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 587-7021.

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