John M Cheatham Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders There will be trouble in River City! Monna L Fitzgerald test pdf viewer Jesse Carrington Janice M Sowards Rhoden family members make plea for tips in Pike Co murders of loved ones Quilting – the art that’s no longer just for Grandma Young is Adams County recipient of Franklin B. Walter All-Scholastic Award Wenstrup recognized as Community Health Advocate Ready, set, go! 25th annual Egg Hunt draws hundreds Applicants needed for Adams County Fair Queen Humane Society encourages responsible animal ownership ACCS holds annual Science Fair Peebles Elementary names March Students of the Month Pierce fires perfect game as Peebles blanks West Union Hunters preparing for 2017 Wild Turkey Season Lady Hounds fall 12-3 at Lynchburg Dragons lose early lead, drop SHAC match up with Fayetteville, 13-6 Senior Profile: Isaiah Anderson Devils roll to big SHAC win at Ripley Despite soggy night, WUHS hosts annual Invitational Meet Celebrities for a night George F Carr Jr Teresa S Hoskins Mary B McClure Richard B Collins Randall D Fetters Former Manchester officer indicted on five counts WUHS student wins state Beta Club Secretary’s seat OVCTC students part of state competition S.R. 73 closed for culvert replacement Peebles Lions Club holds first Easter Egg Hunt Weyrich graduates with honors from Pittsburgh Institute of Aeronautics North Adams Elementary releases Honor Roll for Third grading Period Scholarships available from Jefferson Alumni Olympic athlete speaks at April 6 SAAM event Venture Hawks end their basketball season with a victory at WUHS Devils baseball sweeps doubleheader from Northwest Greyhounds gain SHAC split, split twinbill with East England signs with Rio Grande golf Pierce fans 16, Lady Indians blank Eastern Brown 4-0 Maybe somebody on the river does have a plan Senior Profile: Ryan Dryden Enjoying the view Still a time for celebration Carl R Brown Lena R Staggs Adams County Crews Schedule Culvert Replacement Projects Merlan Shoemaker Dwayne E Thompson Help is on the line! West Union Elementary honors February Students of the Month WUHS hosts 2017 All-County Arts and Music Festival Ohio Brush Creek Canoe/Kayak Access Grand Opening set for April 20 Kasich cracks down on opiate-based prescriptions West Union High School students have successful trip to State Beta Convention North Adams Beta Club excels at State Convention ACRMC hosts annual Health Fair Robert H Bushman Senior Profile: Skylar Newman Nine-run inning leads Lady Hounds to run rule win over West Union WUHS foursome breaks school record First county baseball battle goes to the Greyhounds On the road, Lady Indians pick up two more SHAC victories Senior Profile: Christa Williams One more ‘shining moment’ for SHAC seniors at C103 All-Star Game Esie M Chandler Phyllis Adkins Former Manchester police deputy faces Grand Jury Indictments Cornell tosses no-hitter, Fenton goes deep, Dragons open season with 11-0 SHAC win over Whiteoak New Verizon store opening in West Union Stephen R Palmer Dual culvert replacements for SR 73 Deana P Grooms Tim Phipps Marcella Walker Alvin R Mitchum Senior Profile: Chase Darnell SHAC hoopsters shine at District 14 All-Star Game Greyhounds run rule St. Pat, 15-0 Indians drop SHAC opener West Union hosts early JH Track Meet North Adams student wins state Beta Club President’s seat Anna B Copas Charles A Nelson Nation’s #1 movie comes to stage Artectis hosts grand opening Waiting for the ax to fall, who’s to blame? WU Seniors going to State Sci. Fair Peebles Elem. releases Honor Roll Finding the strength to endure They fought for us Born and raised “free range” Senior Profile: Jordan Crum Big Time Wrestling slams the county

Maidenhair Tree is a living fossil

Few nursery trees have as interesting a story as the Gingko. One reason is that Ginko trees are living fossils, dating back to the Early Jurassic period over 270 million years ago, surviving to the present day very much unchanged. Very few life forms can make that claim. Ginkgo was once widespread throughout the world, but by two million years ago they were only found in small area of China. That’s still the only place they grow wild, but Gingko has become a very popular landscape tree all over the world.

Gingko leaves are unique among seed plants, fan-shaped with veins radiating out into the leaf blade. Two veins begin at the base and fork repeatedly but never branch out the way other tree leaves do. The common name “maidenhair tree” is because the leaves resemble the maidenhair fern. They turn bright lemon yellow before dropping in fall.

Some Ginkgo trees are female and others male. Female plants produce light yellow-brown, soft, fruit-like seeds known for their unpleasant smell, like rancid butter or vomit. This is why good nurseries only sell male Gingko trees. Although Gingko are easy to propagate from seed, nursery-grown ginkgo trees are male cuttings grafted onto plants grown from seed, because the male trees will not produce smelly seeds.

Like ferns, algae and mosses but unlike most trees, Gingkos fertilize their seeds using sperm, which are actually able to move about using flagella which have a cilia-like motion. The flagella/cilia apparatus pulls the body of the sperm forwards, propelling it to the female sex organs inside the tree’s flower.

Ginkgos are large trees, normally reaching 80-100 feet, with some specimens in China being over 164 feet. They are usually deep rooted and resistant to wind and snow damage. A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old.

Ginkgo is native to China; where there are examples believed to be over 1,500 years old. Because of its status in Buddhism and Confucianism, the ginkgo is also widely planted in Korea and parts of Japan; over the centuries it has become established in forests there. The ginkgo leaf is the symbol of the Urasenke school of Japanese tea ceremony. Ginkgos are popular subjects for bonsai; they can be kept artificially small and tended over centuries.

Ginkgos have lasted since prehistory because they are tough survivors, tolerating pollution and confined soil spaces. They rarely suffer disease problems, even in city conditions, and are attacked by few insects. An extreme example of their hardiness is that in Hiroshima, Japan, where six trees growing less than a mile from the 1945 atom bomb explosion were among the few living things in the area to survive the blast. While almost all other plants (and animals) in the area were destroyed, the Ginkgos survived and are still alive today.

Their nut-like seed kernels are a traditional Chinese food, served at special occasions such as weddings and the Chinese New Year. In Chinese culture, they are believed to have health benefits; some also consider them to have aphrodisiac qualities. Japanese cooks add ginkgo seeds to some traditional dishes, or serve them as a garnish. Extracts of ginkgo leaves are believed to have healthful and curative properties. According to some studies, ginkgo can significantly improve attention in healthy individuals. Many studies have indicated other health benefits.

I first saw Gingko trees growing in an oil refinery, where they thrived despite noxious fumes and poor soil. Since that time we’ve planted dozens of them, and never had one fail. We recommend them as memorial trees because of their ruggedness, their timeless quality and their connection to the earliest forms of life on earth. We believe that a tree with the ability to survive hundreds, even thousands of years, is the perfect choice for a living memorial.

Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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http://www.peoplesdefender.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/web1_Leaf.jpg

Gingko trees get the name “Maidenhair Trees” from Maidenhair fern. Both plants have unique fan-shaped leaves whose veins resemble long flowing hair.

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Steve Boehme and his wife Marjorie own GoodSeed Nursery & Landscape, located near Winchester, Ohio at 9736 Tri-County Highway. More information is available at www.goodseedfarm.com or call (937) 587-7021.

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