Thomas D Lute Sandra F Schwab Turning something broken into something beautiful Nowhere to run, nowhere to hide One dead, two injured in ATV accident 2017 Graduation Ceremonies West Union Alumni and Friends Educational Fund announces 2017 Scholarship Awards TAG students tour Pennsylvania Commissioners proclaim Older Americans Month Building an anti-drug culture one t-shirt at a time SECTIONAL CHAMPIONS NAES students awarded Science Camp scholarships SSCC’s Associate Degree Nursing program celebrates graduation Bauman selected to National 4-H Congress Lois Pertuset Hazel Nixon Philip L Paeltz Manchester Youth Volleyball Camp begins May 30 Jase Thatcher Figgins’ walk-off winner sends North Adams to Division III sectional finals Lady Hounds top East 10-3 in sectional opener Commissioner Pell, union reps travel to DC Forgotten experience brings back good memories for WUHS seniors Gordon Boldman Local teen injured in jeep accident BCI Investigation underway Rick Arnold Happy Mother’s Day- Do you want food? Robert Hodge Melvin Tipton Lady Dragons Basketball Camp begins May 22 Lady Devils Basketball Camp is May 30-June 1 National Day of Prayer celebrated in county NAES students enjoy day at GABP Car strikes Amish buggy near Winchester Eldon J Shoenleben Farming out life lessons to children and parents Proposed Medicaid changes could cost Adams County millions Annual ‘Redneck Run” returns to Manchester May 13 They really were the best of times West Union hosts Junior High, High School County Track Meets Figgins signs with SSCC Soccer Perfect again! Senior Profile: Caley Grooms James T Hughes Anderson signs with Rio Grande Basketball Senior Profile: Miranda Schiltz Playing for Dad, Part II Lady Indians win SHAC Big School title Danny Bryant Sadie Stamm Franklin E Brayfield Softball, baseball tourney match ups announced Traveling Vietnam Memorial Wall coming to Georgetown next week Southern Ohio Genealogical Society offers program on ‘Family History Sources at the Ohio History Center’ Joseph A Johnson Jr Kramer tosses two shutouts in five days Trip to Akron = two more wins for Lady Indians softball Devils blank Dragons in non-conference battle Meade twins part of Rio baseball program Playing for Dad Senior Profile: Madison Welch As Mr. Seas It, for ACOVSD High School graduates We stayed up all night with Bob Clean up of Manchester’s abandoned gas stations continues Ribbon cutting held for canoe/kayak access sites Columbus Industries donates driveway repair to Animal Shelter North Adams Elementary recognizes March Students of the Month Animal Shelter Adoption Center announces new hours of operation Major road construction planned for summer months West Union Elementary honors March Students of the Month Charles D Jordan Betty Ginn Pamela M Hampton Former county sheriff celebrates 80th birthday Missing Adams County man is found Lady Hounds fall to Whiteoak in slugfest Calvert’s walk-off gives Hounds 9-8 win over Whiteoak Charles A Benjamin Give My Regards to Broadway Joyce Berry Joe L Easter William E Foster Margaret Belcher John M Cheatham Ronnie Simpson Under new management county hospital is thriving against all odds Historic fairground gazebo demolished One year later, still no arrests in Rhoden family murders There will be trouble in River City! Monna L Fitzgerald Jesse Carrington Janice M Sowards Rhoden family members make plea for tips in Pike Co murders of loved ones Quilting – the art that’s no longer just for Grandma Young is Adams County recipient of Franklin B. Walter All-Scholastic Award Wenstrup recognized as Community Health Advocate Ready, set, go! 25th annual Egg Hunt draws hundreds Applicants needed for Adams County Fair Queen Humane Society encourages responsible animal ownership

Aisle 15 always takes me back

It seems as if the world has tilted a little more to the crazy axis again in the past few days, leaving us all scratching our heads and wondering what might come next. The senseless violence has me, and I am guessing many of you too, wishing for a simpler time and place, and for me, that usually involved memories of my childhood growing up in a small town in the 1970s.

The older I get, the more the memories of an idyllic childhood begin to fade away, but still the thought of spending a couple of more days back in the 70’s is pretty appealing and there is one thing that always transports me to that magic time. That is Aisle 15 at the West Union Wal-Mart. Of course, if you don’t know already, that is the aisle where the baseball cards are sold. I still get that magical kid feeling when I rip open a pack of cards, which is why you will notice me always peeking in Aisle 15 even if my wife has sent me there on another shopping mission.

I had something rare for me last weekend, some time at home with nothing to do, at least until my wife got in the cleaning and moving furniture mode. One of the rooms that we needed to clean was my so-called “man cave”, an addition to the house we added a few years ago and where most of my childhood memories reside. By that I mean, all my sports cards are stuffed in there wherever there is room. There were scattered card boxes around that needed my attention, so I took the time to go through them all and suddenly found myself sitting in the middle of my bed in 1974 or thereabouts sorting through a newly purchased box of cards.

If you were like me, you sorted the cards in many different ways. I usually did it by team and then starting marking on those checklist cards as I began my quest for the complete set. Of course, baseball card collecting then was for the kids, something that it’s not today. In fact, I don’t even know one youngster that collects baseball cards any more. I thought my collection would pass down to my son, but he lost interest about the time he put the first Xbox controller in his hand.

Back to 1974. The stacks of cards all over the top of my bed were something magical and I will never forget the thrill of getting on my bicycle and making my way to the Locker Plant in Ripley where a brand new unopened box of Topps baseball, football, or basketball cards was waiting for me. (We had connections at the store so a phone call usually informed us of their arrival.) After opening a couple of packs right there in front of the store, it was a mad rush home to open the rest, not worrying one bit about how much a card was worth or maybe it was best to leave the box unopened. Of course, it’s if I knew then what I know now, but in 1974 I could care less about value. I just wanted to see the shots of Bench, Perez, Rose, Foster, Morgan, Griffey, Geronimo, and Concepcion show up in my hand, even if they may have had a little bubble gum stain here and there.

Now, those days have come and gone and the days of buying mass quantities of baseball cards has also passed. As many of you know, the hobby has turned into a plaything for rich adults and my budget now includes more important things, such as food, car payments, utility bills, and all those other things that I didn’t worry about in 1974 and wish I didn’t have to worry about now. I had all the information I needed at hand, just look at the back of the baseball card. Now, it didn’t have any information on number of games bet on, but that’s a whole other story.

So, here’s my advice to all of you. When the news of today gets you down and wondering, find something to take you back to a simpler time. For me, that’s a trip to Aisle 15.

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